Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Writing Learning Objectives

No description
by

Institutional Assessment

on 4 August 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Writing Learning Objectives

Feedback
Use of Results
Learning Goals
Teaching-Learning-Assessment-Cycle
Learning Objectives
Assessment & Evaluation
Learning objectives are statements that explicitly tell learners the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they must have after instruction.
What are Learning Objectives?

Learning objectives are statements of
specific

measurable
learning
outcomes
that students are
realistically
expected to
attain
in a given
time period.
What Learning Objectives are NOT
The student will be able to develop a course of action to conduct, publish and enact the results of a research study.
General and Enabling Objectives
(course-level and unit-level)
How Can You Write a Good Learning Objective?
Exercise:
Label the Learner and Action in the objectives on your handout. Can you find a Condition or Criteria too?
Why Bother to Write Learning Objectives?
Professors
Objectives help
Communicate their expectations.
Select essential content.
Design appropriate activities and assessments.
Understand what they should "get out of" and "put into" a course.
Take useful notes.
Study efficiently.
Students
Objectives help
Imagine this scenario!
Can you solve this math problem?
Teresa Redd, Ph.D.
Director of CETLA
202-806-0870
www.cetla.howard.edu

Writing Learning Objectives
Choose the Right Verb
Identify assessments that could demonstrates that student had fulfilled the objectives.
Evaluate objectives using SMART criteria.

Convert poor objectives into good ones.

Write appropriate learning objectives for your course.
Identify the components of a learning objective.

Choose an appropriate verb for an objective.
Explain why learning objectives are important.

Define "learning objectives".
Learning Objectives
"
S
M
A
R
T
" Objectives are:

Choose the Right Verb
Cognitive Domain:
Mental Process
Bloom
1956
Anderson
2002
Domains
Affective
Affective Domain:
Feelings, values, or emotions
Psychomotor Domain:
Manual or Physical Skills
Underline the verbs in the objectives in your syllabus.
Are they specific enough to assess?
What level of Bloom's Taxonomy do the majority of the verbs represent?
Is that level appropriate for the students and the course?
Exercise:
Cognitive
Psychomotor
Upon successful completion of this retreat, you will be able to do the following:
Gerunda B. Hughes, Ph.D.
Director of OIAE
202-865-0207
www.howard.edu/assessment

Exercise:
Are the objectives in your syllabus
S
M
A
R
T
?
Are these objectives

S
M
A
R
T
?
S
pecific
M
easurable
A
ction-oriented,
A
ppropriate, and
A
ligned
R
ealistic
T
ime-framed
Instructional objectives
e.g.,"The Instructor will..."
Course descriptions
e.g., "This course covers..."
Course requirements
e.g., "You must attend..."
Course goals
e.g., "The purpose of this course is to..
Course outlines
e.g., a list of topics
Upon successfully completing this course, you will be able to evaluate methods of identifying and applying mathematical reasoning.
NOW YOU TRY IT!
Well written objectives
Poorly written objectives
This course is designed to expose students to methods of mathematical reasoning.
This course will teach you to understand algebraic functions.
Exercise:
Write a learning objective for one of your courses. Complete the worksheet to determine whether your objective is at the appropriate level and whether it is SMART. Exchange worksheets and consult with your neighbor.
What do objectives help professors do?
What do objectives help students do?
Objectives:
Explain, analyze, develop,
and
criticize
literary interpretations clearly and effectively.
Demonstrate
an ability to revise content and edit for grammatical and stylistic clarity.
Write
critically about literature, using textual evidence with proper citation.
Analyze
work(s) of literature in one or more interpretive contexts or frameworks.
Write
and
organize
complete essays that demonstrate the ability to use correct grammar (syntax, mechanics, and citation of sources) at a college level of sophistication.
Assessments:
Explain
the point of view of the author and cite literary evidence.
Revise
your paper and based on writing styles learned in class to reflect feedback given.
Develop
an argument refuting or agreeing with the author using evidence from the text.
Analyse
the text and identify the various themes.
Write
a paper that demonstrates the main ideas of the text be sure to use proper citations and grammar.
Exercise:
Align your learning objective with an appropriate assessment. Consult with your neighbor.
Identify gaps in current functions versus expected functions of the system.
Identify a problem that can be researched in an effort to resolve gaps in functions of the system.
Develop a research question.
Establish background, literature review, purpose, and methodology for desired research question.
Obtain the necessary credentials and certifications.
Obtain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval.
Develop a research proposal for funding with a budget.
Apply for funding that best fits your research.
Collect and analyze data based on the established methodology and consent protocol.
Use results of analysis to write a complete and comprehensive report that includes recommendations for intervention or improvement.

Identify multiple publications such as scholarly journals that best fit your research study.
Based on guidelines for publication, prepare manuscripts for submission to different types of publications for different audiences.
Submit the manuscripts for publication.
Share findings with colleagues and other stakeholders and seek recommendations.
Begin dialogue for implementation of recommendations.
Implement recommendations.
Keep record of the recommendations implemented.
Identify any additional limitations observed during the implementation of intervention.
Evaluate positive and negative effects of the implemented recommendations on pilot group.
Identify methods to modify interventions in order to accommodate more positive effects.
Bloom's Taxonomy

Observe the functions of a specific system.
Compare observed functions of the system to its expected functions.
Observe overall effectiveness of the system in its current state.
The Learner

Example:
At the conclusion of this unit/course/class, the student will be expected to demonstrate his/her ability to write well-constructed and organized essays containing clear, defensible, and substantial ideas.

The Action


Example:
At the conclusion of this unit/course/class, the student will be expected to demonstrate his/her ability to write well-constructed and organized essays containing clear, defensible, and substantial ideas.

The Condition

Example:
At the conclusion of this unit/course/class, the student will be expected to demonstrate his/her ability to write well-constructed and organized essays containing clear, defensible, and substantial ideas.

The Criteria

Example:
At the conclusion of this unit/course/class, the student will be expected to demonstrate his/her ability to write well-constructed and organized essays containing clear, defensible, and substantial ideas.
The student will become aware of the principles of writing.
Exchange syllabi and ask your neighbor.
Students will be able to demonstrate the principles of composition through
grammatically sound and thorough writing .
Upon completing this course, students should be familiar with the proper MLA citation style.
Six Levels:
Knowledge:
recognize, recall, label, list
Comprehension:
interpret, classify, explain
Application:
use, illustrate, demonstrate, apply
Analysis:
differentiate, calculate, diagram
Synthesis:
combine, design, formulate
Evaluate:
critique, justify, recommend
Full transcript