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CSCL

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dalit mor

on 14 February 2014

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Transcript of CSCL

Computer
Supported
Collaborative
Learning
Arose in the 1990s in reaction to software that forced students to learn as isolated individuals
Computer support can take the form of distant or F2F interaction, either synchronously or asynchronously
The technology side of the CSCL agenda focuses on the design and study of fundamentally social technologies
Computer-supported collaborative learning: An historical perspective
Gerry Stahl, Timothy Koschmann, Dan Suthers
cooperative incentive structures create a situation in which the only way individuals can reach their goals is if the group is successful (Johnson & Johnson, 1992; Slavin, 1983)(http://www.konferenslund.se/pp/TAPPS_Slavin.pdf)
http://www.ijello.org/Volume5/IJELLOv5p187-195Rosen671.pdf
Different tools allow/strengthen different kind of interactions: tool as a constraint and a facilitator
Computers only as mediator?
Other
added value
of using computer:
¿Cooperative or Collaborative Learning?
Teasley (1995) state that:
“Cooperation
is accomplished by the division of labor

among participants, as an activity where each person is responsible for a portion of the

problem solving...” while
collaborative
learning involves the “... mutual engagement of

participants in a coordinated effort to solve the problem together”
BUT
BOTH
share a number of common elements including:
Learning is
ACTIVE
The teacher is a
FACILITATOR
Teaching & learning are
SHARED

EXPERIENCES
Students participate in
SMALL-GROUP
activities
Students take
RESPONSABILITY
for learning
Students
REFLECT
on their own assumptions and thought processes
Social and team
SKILLS
are
DEVELOPED
through the give-and-take of consensus- building
From the teacher point of view (instructional motives)
Prepare
students for the knowledge society
Enhance
students cognitive performance or deep understanding
To
add flexibility
of time and space to cooperative/collaborative learning
To foster
engagement
and keep
track
of students' cooperative/ collaborative work
Benefits for the students:
Development
of higher order thinking
skills
Students
satisfaction
with the experience
Improved
productivity
Computer as
a conversation partner.
Cognitive load
: the computer can perform or enhance some of the tasks that usually individuals have to carry on a F2F situation. For exp:
Coordination (shared calendars)
Information retrieval (access to internet &/or saved files and documents)
Co-construction of documentation
(
editing, saving, manipulation of information.)
Why
collaboration?
Cognition is distributed across objects, physical environment and people.
Studies show that cognition distributed
across groups is
NOT
necessarily better
SO
BUT
Conscious thoughts SHARE important
features with group discussion: group learning ALWAYS
involves communication (verbal and nonverbal) and thinking is mediated and structured BY language
By working in collaboration we are
LEARNING
to
THINK
It's primary
AIM
is to provide and environment that
supports collaboration between students to enhance
their learning processes.
on the idea that cognition is a social rather than a fixed entity.
Systems that support management in collaboration learning
Supporting group members’ activities related to their interaction.
Determine how to structure the environment in which the collaboration takes place.
Regulate the student interaction during the learning activities.
Computational models
Structuring approaches aim to create favorable conditions for learning by designing the situation before the interaction begins.
Change the appearance of the environment based on the nature of the task.
Regulation that requires a quick appraisal of the situation based on a comparison of the current situation to a model of desired interaction.
How might a computer assess the quality of knowledge sharing?
Soller A., Mones A. M., Jermann P., & Muehlenbrock M. (2005). From Mirroring to Guiding: A Review of State of the Art Technology for Supporting collaborative Learning. International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education (IJAIED) 15, 261-290.
The primary aim of CSCL is to provide an environment that supports collaboration between students to enhance their learning processes , facilitate collective learning, or group cognition.
Which tools are needed for collaboration?
Instructors can evaluate the
process
students use in approaching a given problem and finding solutions;

they can assess the
final product
or end result of the project;

or they can evaluate the individual student’s
learning outcomes
.

Approaches to Assessment
communication
co-creation
consensus building
resource management
project management
2
dimensions:
the technical &
the social
tools for sharing content
tools for communication
Collaborative learning involves joint intellectual effort by groups of students who are mutually searching for meanings, understanding, or solutions (Smith and MacGregor, 1992)
Full transcript