Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Why Programming?

Prezi for House Assemblies

Mark Tranter

on 10 November 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Why Programming?

Why Learn Programming? Ada Lovelace.
Usually considered the first computer programmer. Shaun Fanning - Creator of Napster Mark Zuckerberg wrote Facebook on his laptop while he was a student at University. Twitter is written in Scala, a really well-designed programming language. Learn Scala - it is probably going to be the next big thing! The Raspberry Pi: a computer for £25.
Created by a charitable foundation to get kids into computing. Python Scratch The UK is home to the studios that have developed video games such as:
Grand Theft Auto IV
Broken Sword
LittleBigPlanet. Tim Berners-Lee Steve Furber, the ARM processor and their Cambridge HQ. The Foundry
One of the UK's leading CGI companies. The programs we use to conjure processes are like a sorcerer's spells. They are carefully composed from symbolic expressions in arcane and esoteric programming languages that prescribe the tasks we want our processes to perform. What governments don't seem to understand is that software is the nearest thing to magic that we've yet invented. It's pure "thought stuff" – which means that it enables ingenious or gifted people to create wonderful things out of thin air. All you need to change the world is imagination, programming ability and access to a cheap PC. Two recent reports have highlighted problems with ICT in UK Schools. The RPi uses an ARM chip and various flavours of Linux. David Cameron: "we're not doing enough to teach the next generation of programmers". Gove: if new Computer Science GCSEs are developed that meet high standards of intellectual depth and practical value, we will certainly consider including Computer Science as an option in the English Baccalaureate. Eric Schmidt: I was flabbergasted to learn that today computer science isn't even taught as standard in UK schools. Your IT curriculum focuses on teaching how to use software, but gives no insight into how it's made. It's important to encourage girls to get into computing. They are under-represented on degree-courses,
and in the industry as a whole. Programmers change the world we live in. Bill Gates was only 20 when he wrote Altair Basic -
the first Microsoft product. Jack Dorsey
creator of Twitter. Love your iPhone? All those apps are computer programs. Your smartphone probably runs on an ARM chip.
So does the Raspberry Pi. Programming is working out how to do something.
And then designing a process that will do it. It's a classic example of reflective learning.

Repeat until it works perfectly:
write code
test Programming is also about abstraction.
Once you have a part of the code working,
you can treat is as a "black box":
You can forget about how it works,
and move on to the next part of the problem. Got an Android phone?
You can do Python anywhere!
Full transcript