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Richard Nixon & the Watergate Scandal

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on 19 November 2013

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Transcript of Richard Nixon & the Watergate Scandal

Nixon got away with this all through the election, which is a given, because he's been stealing propaganda techniques, Nixon had a huge advantage over the Democrats.
Richard Nixon & the Watergate Scandal
What is the Watergate?
The Watergate hotel is where the Democratic National Committee headquarters was, in 1972. This was when George McGovern & Richard Nixon were presidential Opponents.
Watergate is more than just any old hotel that happened to be holding a conference. In this building, there was a crime of five men; Bernard Barker, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martínez, James W. McCord, Jr, Frank Sturgis, and candidate Nixon himself, of course.
Nixon had a few of his fellow spies put a phone tap, or recording microphones in the conference room, which is where the Democrats talked about voting strategies. This was considered theft, because stealing information is a crime, especially if it has to do with the election.
The picture to the left is a caricature of Nixon listening in through the phone tap, and the one to the left is a picture of a tapped phone warning.
Obviously, because Nixon had both Democratic & Republican propaganda techniques on hand, he won in a landslide; 60.67% of the popular vote, and a whopping 96.7% of the electoral vote.

Nixon would've been disqualified had anyone known about his doings, but he and his fellow spies kept quiet and didn't draw attention. That is, until the FBI got involved.
Somehow, the FBI knew that something was up. They went through investigation, along with the press going through one of their own. During August 1972, President Nixon told reporters, "no one in the White House staff, no one in this administration, presently employed, was involved in this very bizarre incident."
Nixon and his top aids started making cover-up after cover-up for all of his illegal activities, more than just the Watergate.
Two brave young reporters from Washington Post, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein looked at the facts around them and had many dark secrets revealed.
Reporters have suddenly been very interested in President Nixon, more so now then before. With story after story after endless cover up story, things are starting to get a tad bit fishy.
For example, would you've guessed that one of the Watergate burglars, James W. McCord, was actually a retired CIA member, and the security coordinator for Nixon's re-election committee? A $25,000 check for Nixon's re-election campaign had been given to the bank account of one of the burglars. These and many other secrets have been revealed through these two talented reporters.
Once many kept secrets came out, Nixon was becoming less and less popular. He's getting a lot of negative comments through feedback and behind-the-back. Here's an example of a common protest:
At this point, Nixon knew what was coming. We
all knew what was coming. He didn't want to get impeached, so instead he resigned. Nixon would rather be chickened than shamed.
Credits:

http://www.besthistorysites.net/index.php/american-history/1900/nixon-watergate

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/special/watergate/part4.html

http://www.history.com/topics/richard-m-nixon

http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/impeachments/nixon.htm

http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/national.php?year=1972

Full transcript