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Leaves of Grass Preface Analysis

The poetic analysis of the poem composed by Walt Whitman. Analysis by: Luci Tramposch, Jaylan Daniels, and Devan Stiles
by

Luci Tramposch

on 19 October 2012

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Transcript of Leaves of Grass Preface Analysis

Preface from Leaves of Grass Poem by Walt Whitman Theme Nationalism- the author expresses his admiration for America by stating that America itself is the greatest poem and that it is full of diverse activities and natural wonders Shifts The poem starts out talking about the American people in a literal way then shifts to talking about the "American spirit" Title After reading the poem, we learned that grass is a term which is used to describe literary works that, in someone's eyes, have little value. Leaves is another term for the pages in which they are printed on. Attitude The tone is proud and sentimental. This is because he is proud of how far the country has come and he talks about it like they are old friends. Title Prior to reading this poem, we thought it was going to be about nature and our surroundings. Poetic Devices comparison: "Here at last is something in the doings of man that corresponds with the broadcast doings of the day and night."
symbolism: Slavery is being shown as a corpse in a room. Paraphrasing + "America does not repeal the past or what it has produced under its forms or amid other politics or the idea of castes or the old religions... accepts the lesson with calmness... is not so impatient as has been supposed that the slough stilll sticks to opinions and manners and literature while the life which served its requirements has passed into the new life of the new forms... percieves that the corpse is slowly borne from the eating and sleeping rooms of the house... perceives that the corpse is slowly borne from the eating and sleepings rooms of the house... percieves that it waits a little while in the door that it was fittest for its days... that its action has descended to the stalwart and well-shaped heir who approaches... and that he shall be fittest for his days... that its action has descended to the stalwart and well-shaped heir who approaches... and that he shall be fittest for his days.
The Americans of all nations at any time upon the earth have probably the fullest poetical nature. The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem. In the history of the earth hitherto the largest and most stirring appear tame and orderly to their ampler largeness and stir. Here at last is something in the doings of man that corresponds with the broadcast doings of the day and night. Here is not merely a nation but a teeming nation of nations. Here is action untied from strings necessarily blind to particulars and details magnificently moving in vast masses. Here is the hospitality which forever indicates heroes.... Here are the roughs and beards and space and ruggedness and nonchalance that the soul loves. Here the performance disdaining the trivial unapproached in the tremendous audacity of its crowds and groupings and the push of its perspective spreads with crampless and flowing breadth and showers its prolific and splendid extravagance. One sees it must indeed own the riches of the summer and winter, and need never be bankrupt while corn grows from the ground or the orchards drop apples or the bays contain fish or men beget children upon women...." Bibliography "Leaves of Grass By Walt Whitman Walt Whitman Biography."
Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman CliffsNotes. N.p., n.d. Web. Oct. 2012.
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