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Untitled Prezi

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lauryn spells

on 25 September 2013

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Transcript of Untitled Prezi

Inupiaq
(Inuit)

Geographic Location
Organization
The Inuit lived in smaller family groups with no real leader or Chief.

During the winter, families would live and hunt together in larger groups (several families), but during the summer they would split up to follow the hunt.

Language
Religion
The Inuit believed in animism: all living and non-living things had a spirit. That included people, animals, inanimate objects, and forces of nature.

Religious Leaders-
The only people who had enough power to control the spirits were the powerful religious leaders called the Shamans or 'Angakoks'. Shamans used charms and dances as a means to communicate with the spirit world

Ceremonies-
The person's body was taken far away from the village. Their belongings were beside them, so they could take it to the afterlife. The body was covered with driftwood and small stones. The Inuit surrounded the body with a circle of stones.
Housing
In the past, the Inuit used to use two homes. The first home was the igloo. The Inuit used the igloo in the winter. They would build the igloo in a spiral shape using the snow from the inside of the circle to cut blocks with a snow knife.
Tools
Diet
Transportation
Fuel
Special Customs
Trade and Commerce
Famous Person
They could trade many things to other tribes that did not have them. They would trade things such as dolls, guns, sleds, fish, and food. They would trade things to other tribes not just because
they had a lot of things but they wanted to help them out.

For example, they could trade a kayak to help tribes with transportation. This is what and how the Inuit used their economy.

http://intermediatehuron.blogspot.com/2008/06/work-life-inuit-traded-many-things.html
born May 26, 1964 is a Canadian politician. He is the first Inuk member called to the Nunavut Bar, the first Premier of Nunavut and the only multi-term premier elected in consensus-style governments of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.[3]
On November 4, 2010, he was elected Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut. Okalik represented the electoral district of Iqaluit West in the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut until April 6, 2011 when he announced he would be resigning in order to run for the Liberal Party of Canada in the riding of Nunavut in the 2011 Canadian federal election.
Paul Okalik
Inuit consumed a diet of foods that are fished, hunted, and gathered locally. This may include walrus, Ringed Seal, Bearded Seal, beluga whale, caribou, polar bear, muskoxen, birds (including their eggs) and fish.They consume this type of diet because a mostly meat diet is "effective in keeping the body warm, making the body strong, keeping the body fit, and even making that body healthy".

Native American People Of Alaska book
Ulu- The ulu was made by women. They used a curved edged knife to chop through hard, frozen meat

Harpoon- Harpoons are ropes connected to spears. They have to be thrown with precise aim at the game being hunted and then pulled with the rope
Bow and Arrow-Bow and Arrows are used for exact aims. Even today people use them for fun and for hunting.
They used a tent as the summer home because it was not as warm as an igloo. They needed the igloo because it kept in a lot more heat than the tent. Igloos could of been put together to make hallways to other igloos, or they could of made just one big igloo. The tent was often made of animal skins with sinew as the outline. Sinew was a very strong string that held things together such as a tent.
Summer Transportation-

The Inuit people made two types of boats: the kayak and the umiak.
Kayaks were small, lightweight boats mainly used for hunting.Umiaks were large, open boats mainly used for travel.

Winter Transportation

The first way is by Inuit dog sleds. When the first Inuit arrived in North America, they brought dogs with them. The dogs that pulled the sleds are called husky’s. They are used for traveling in the snow. They used the huskies because they were actually made for the climate there since it is below 50 degrees there they practically love the winter.

The Inuit used whale blubber to light there homes and create warmth in the winter.
The Inuit people believed in spirits. According to them, everyone, everything and every animal had a spirit. They even considered other spirits like the wind, weather, sun and the moon.
There was special rules that the Inuits followed to please all the spirits.
They thought that if they didn't follow the rules then they would get sickness or misfortune as a punishment.

Moon Spirit
The traditional language of the Inuit is a system of closely interrelated dialects that are not readily comprehensible from one end of the Inuit world to the other.
invialvktun
invinnaqtun
Inuktitut
Kalaallisut
Navi
Inupiatun
Qawiaraq
Labradorimiutut
Yupik
Aleut
Iñupiatun
North Baffin Inuktitut
Malimiutun
Here are some of the Languages
Inuit communities are found in the Arctic, in the Northwest Territories, Labrador and Quebec in Canada, above tree line in Alaska (where people are called the Inupiat and Yupik), and in Russia (where people are called the Yupik people). In some areas, Inuit people are called “Eskimos” however many Inuit find this term offensive. The word “Inuit” means “the people” in the Inuktitut language.
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