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CHAPTER 10 RIZAL'S LIFE, WORKS AND WRITINGS

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Elizalyn De los Santos

on 24 July 2014

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Transcript of CHAPTER 10 RIZAL'S LIFE, WORKS AND WRITINGS

RIZAL'S LIFE, WORKS & WRITINGS
PREPARED BY
ELIZALYN DE LOS SANTOS
MARJUN SIMBIT

CHAPTER 10
First Homecoming
(1887-1888)

Rizal was determined to come back to the
Philippines for the following reasons:

Storm over Noli Me Tangere

After five years of his memorable sojourn in Europe, Rizal returned to the Philippines.

However, Rizal was warned by the following not to return to the Philippines because his Noli Me Tangere angered the friars:

Paciano Mercado – Rizal’s adviser and only brother.
Silvestre Ubaldo – Rizal’s brother in law; husband of Olimpia.
Jose Ma. Cecilio (Chenggoy) – one of Rizal’s closest friends.
Rizal visited the Jesuit fathers to ask for their feedback on the novel.
He was gladly welcomed by the following friars:
Fr. Francisco de Paula Sanchez
Fr. Jose Bech
Fr. Federico Faura – told Rizal that everything in the novel was the truth and warned him that he may lose his head because of it.
Decision to return home

– To operate his mother’s eyes
– To serve his people who had long been oppressed by Spanish tyrants.
– To find out for himself how the Noli Me Tangere and his other writings were affecting Filipinos and Spaniards.
– To inquire why Leonor Rivera remained silent.

Rizal arrives in Manila

Rizal left Rome by train to Marseilles, a French port and boarded Djemnah, the same steamer that brought him to Europe five years ago.
There were 50 passengers: 4 Englishmen, 2 Germans, 3 Chinese, 2 Japanese, 40 Frenchmen, and 1 Filipino (Rizal)
In Saigon (Ho Chi Minh), Vietnam – he transferred to another steamer, Haiphong, that brought him to Manila.
Happy Homecoming

When Rizal arrived in Calamba, rumors spread that he was a:
German spy
An agent of Otto Von Bismarck – the liberator of Germany.
A Protestant
A Mason
A soul halfway to damnation
Rizal’s plans of coming back home
As early as 1884, Rizal wanted to go back to the Philippines for the following reasons:
Financial difficulties in Calamba
Desire to prove that there is no reason to fear going home.
His belief that the Spanish regime will not punish the innocent

Rizal revisited the Jesuits

Governor General Emilio Terrero – wrote to Rizal requesting to come to Malacañang Palace.
Somebody had whispered to his ear that the Noli contains subversive ideas.
Rizal explained to him that he merely exposed the truth, but did not advocate subversive ideas.
He was pleased by Rizal’s explanation and curious about the book, he asked for a copy of the novel.
Attackers of the Noli

Archbishop Pedro Payo – a Dominican Archbishop of Manila.
Sent a copy of the Nolito Fr. Gregorio Echavarria, Rector of the University of Santo Tomas to examine the novel.
Jose Taviel de Andrade


In Calamba

Rizal established a medical clinic.
Doña Teodora – was Rizal’s first patient

Doctor Uliman – Rizal was called this name
because he came from Germany.

Gymnasium – was opened by Rizal for the young people.
He introduced European sports fencing and
shooting to discourage them from cockfighting and gambling.




Sad Moments in Calamba

Leonor Rivera – Rizal tried to visit her in Tarlac
but his parents forbade him to go because
Leonor’s mother did not like him for a son-in-
law.

Olimpia Mercado-Ubaldo – died because of
child birth.

A young Spanish lieutenant who came
from a noble family

He was cultured and knew painting

He could speak French, English and Spanish.


Governor-General Terrero – was not satisfied
with the report of the Dominicans so he sent the novel to the
Permanent Commission of Censorship which was
composed of priests and lawyers.

• Fr. Salvador Font – Augustinian friar curate of
Tondo was the head of the commission.

– The group found that the novel contain subversive
ideas against the Church and Spain and recommended

The newspaper published Font’s written
report
The banning of the Noli Me Tangere served to
make it popular
The masses supported the book.

• Fr. Jose Rodriguez – Augustinian Prior of
Guadalupe
– Published a series of eight pamphlets under the
heading Questions of Supreme Interest to blast
the Noli and other anti-Spanish writings.
– Copies of anti-Rizal pamphlets were sold after
Mass.
– Many Filipinos were forced to buy them in order
not to displease the friars.


The novel was fiercely attacked in the session hall
of the Senate of the Spanish Cortes.
• Senators:

– General Jose de Salamanca
– General Luis de Pando
– Sr. Fernando Vida

• Vicente Barantes – Spanish academician of
Madrid who formerly occupied high government
position in the Philippines bitterly criticized the
novel in an article published in the Madrid
newspaper, La España Moderna.

The newspaper published Font’s written
report
The banning of the Noli Me Tangere served to
make it popular
The masses supported the book.

Fr. Jose Rodriguez – Augustinian Prior of
Guadalupe
Published a series of eight pamphlets under the
heading Questions of Supreme Interest to blast
the Noli and other anti-Spanish writings.
Copies of anti-Rizal pamphlets were sold after
Mass.
Many Filipinos were forced to buy them in order
not to displease the friars.

The novel was fiercely attacked in the session hall
of the Senate of the Spanish Cortes.
• Senators:

– General Jose de Salamanca
– General Luis de Pando
– Sr. Fernando Vida

• Vicente Barantes – Spanish academician of
Madrid who formerly occupied high government
position in the Philippines bitterly criticized the
novel in an article published in the Madrid
newspaper, La España Moderna.
Full transcript