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Edgar Allan Poe: Investigating Poets & Their Art

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Nabeel Shahid

on 29 November 2015

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Transcript of Edgar Allan Poe: Investigating Poets & Their Art

Eldorado

Gaily bedight,
A gallant knight,
In sunshine and in shadow,
Had journeyed long,
Singing a song,
In search of Eldorado.

But he grew old—
This knight so bold—
And o’er his heart a shadow—
Fell as he found
No spot of ground
That looked like Eldorado.

And, as his strength
Failed him at length,
He met a pilgrim shadow—
‘Shadow,’ said he,
‘Where can it be—
This land of Eldorado?’

‘Over the Mountains
Of the Moon,
Down the Valley of the Shadow,
Ride, boldly ride,’
The shade replied,—
‘If you seek for Eldorado!’

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20




1
Stanzas
2
3
4
5
1
Stanzas
A Valentine

For her this rhyme is penned, whose luminous eyes,
Brightly expressive as the twins of Leda,
Shall find her own sweet name, that nestling lies
Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
Search narrowly the lines!- they hold a treasure
Divine- a talisman- an amulet
That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure-
The words- the syllables! Do not forget
The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor
And yet there is in this no Gordian knot
Which one might not undo without a sabre,
If one could merely comprehend the plot.
Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering
Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus
Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing
Of poets, by poets- as the name is a poet's, too,
Its letters, although naturally lying
Like the knight Pinto- Mendez Ferdinando-
Still form a synonym for Truth- Cease trying!
You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do.
Rhyme Scheme
A

A

B

B

C
D
C
D
E

E
F
G

G

F
Though this poem has no set rhyme scheme, it certainly has rhyme. Edgar Allen Poe uses rhyme in many of his shorter works.
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15




20
Structure
This poem only has one stanza. This is uncommon for an Edgar Allen Poe poem.
Figurative Language and Devices

Allusion and Simile (line 2)











Alliteration (line 13)



Simile (lines 15-17)
Poe uses allusion, similes, and alliteration to add figures to the poem. he alludes the "twins of Leda", who are Castor and Pollux in Greek Mythology. It can also allude to "Leda and the Swan". However, he usually uses more figurative language and not many allusions in his works.
Edgar Allan Poe
1835–1847
Bibliography
Music:

Luévano, Marcela, comp. Creepy Music Box (Extended Ver.). 20 Dec. 2012. Background Music.

Images:

1848 "Ultima Thule" Daguerreotype of Poe. Digital image. Wikipedia. Wikipedia, n.d. Web. 11 Nov. 2015. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Allan_Poe#/media/File:Edgar_Allan_Poe_2_retouched_and_transparent_bg.png>.

Oval Frame. Digital image. Clipanda. Clipanda, n.d. Web. 11 Nov. 2015. <http://www.clipartpanda.com/categories/antique-oval-frame-silhouette>.
Spirits of the Dead

Thy soul shall find itself alone
’Mid dark thoughts of the gray tombstone—
Not one, of all the crowd, to pry
Into thine hour of secrecy.

Be silent in that solitude,
Which is not loneliness—for then
The spirits of the dead who stood
In life before thee are again
In death around thee—and their will
Shall overshadow thee: be still.

The night, tho’ clear, shall frown—
And the stars shall look not down
From their high thrones in the heaven,
With light like Hope to mortals given—
But their red orbs, without beam,
To thy weariness shall seem
As a burning and a fever
Which would cling to thee for ever.

Now are thoughts thou shalt not banish,
Now are visions ne’er to vanish;
From thy spirit shall they pass
No more—like dew-drop from the grass.

The breeze—the breath of God—is still—
And the mist upon the hill,
Shadowy—shadowy—yet unbroken,
Is a symbol and a token—
How it hangs upon the trees,
A mystery of mysteries!

Rhyme Scheme
A
A


B
C
B
C
D
D


Similarly to the previous poem, and to Poe's other short poems, this poem has no ryhme pattern, but it contains rhymes.
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25
Structure
Like most of Poe's short poems, this poem has more then three stanzas.
Figurative Language and Devices






Alliteration (line 5)






Personification (lines 11, 12, 13)


Simile (line 14)



Alliteration (line 18)



Personification and Simile (lines 20-22)


Metaphor (lines 23-26)
As seen in this work, and most of Poe's other poems, simile and metaphor are used a lot. These two figurative devices are a common theme, as he uses them to convey the deep meanings of his poems.
E
E
F
F
G
G


H
H
I
I

D
D
J
J
K
K

1
Stanzas
The Sleeper (Stanza 2)

Oh, lady bright! can it be right—
This window open to the night?
The wanton airs, from the tree-top,
Laughingly through the lattice drop—
The bodiless airs, a wizard rout,
Flit through thy chamber in and out,
And wave the curtain canopy
So fitfully—so fearfully—
Above the closed and fringéd lid
’Neath which thy slumb’ring soul lies hid,
That, o’er the floor and down the wall,
Like ghosts the shadows rise and fall!
Oh, lady dear, hast thou no fear?
Why and what art thou dreaming here?
Sure thou art come o’er far-off seas,
A wonder to these garden trees!
Strange is thy pallor! strange thy dress!
Strange, above all, thy length of tress,
And this all solemn silentness!
Rhyme Scheme
I
I
C
C
J
J
K
K
L
L
M
M
N
N
O
O
P
P
P
This poem has a rhyme pattern where the sound repeats itself at least once in a row. This is not uncommon for Poe, however it is not as common as no present rhyme scheme.
20




25




30




35
Structure
Like
Eldorado
the full original poem has four stanzas, which is around the normal length of most of Poe's poems.
Figurative Language and Devices



Alliteration (line 20)



Alliteration (line 24)

Personification (line 27)

Simile (line 29)






Like almost all of the poems shown before, this poem incorporates figures such as alliteration, personification, and metaphor. These figures, along with the simile, are the most used by Poe in his poems.
Theme
This poem is actually about a person for whom Poe wrote it. It describes a riddle within the poem. When you take a letter from each line, you will get the name of the person: F-R-A-N-C-E-S S-A-R-G-E-N-T O-S-G-O-O-D. A lot of Poe's works have hidden meanings, but not as complex as this one.
1
Stanzas
2
3
4
Rhyme Scheme
A
A
B
C
C
B

D
D
B
E
E
B

F
F
B
G
G
B



B
H
H
B


Structure
Figurative Language and Devices



Alliteration (line 3)

Alliteration (line 5)












Personification (line 15)




Alliteration (lines 19-20)




Personification (line 23)
Alliteration and personification are seen in this poem, as they are a common device that Poe uses.
Repetition
This poem contains a lot of straightfoward repetition, which Poe uses a fair amount in his poetry.
The first three stanzas contain a consistent AABCCB pattern, but with AA and CC being switched with different sounds. This is different than most of Poe's works, as they do not contain set patterns.
This poem contains four stanzas, similar to the amount of stanzas seen in the previous poem.
Meter? Yes No
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12

10

10

10

10
12


14


12

Meter? Yes No
8
8
8


8
8
8
8
8
8

6

8




8

8
8

8

8


8

8


Meter? Yes No
4
4

4
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4
4

4
4


4
4

4
4


4
4

4
4


This poem contains
iambic
meter.
Meter? Yes No
Although some lines contain meter, it was most likely not intentionally written in.
Conclusion
Introduction
Thank you for watching.
1
Stanzas
The Valley of Unrest
(excerpt)

Once it smiled a silent dell
Where the people did not dwell;
They had gone unto the wars,
Trusting to the mild-eyed stars,
Nightly, from their azure towers,
To keep watch above the flowers,
In the midst of which all day
The red sun-light lazily lay.
Now each visitor shall confess
The sad valley’s restlessness.
Nothing there is motionless—
Nothing save the airs that brood
Rhyme Scheme
A
A
B
B
C
C
D
D
E
E
E
F
Like
The Sleeper
, this poem
has a rhyme sequence where each sound repeats itself at least once.
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10





Structure
The full poem has only one stanza, like
A Valentine
. This theme is not unheard of in Poe's works, but it is scarce,
Figurative Language and Devices





Personification [of "stars''] (line 4)



Personification [of "the sun"] (line 8)




Poe personifies the stars and sun.
Meter? Yes No
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8

8
8

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Personification [full poem; of "valley of unrest"] (lines 1-27)
The entire poem is a personification of the "Valley of Unrest". Poe commonly personifies the subject of the poem.
R.I.P
Edgar Allen Poe is best known for writing poems and short stories in the horror genre. He was born on January 19, 1809. Though he only lived for forty years, Poe wrote for the majority of his life, writing aroun 80 poems.
Rhyme: Poe normally writes without a set ryhme scheme, but if he does, he uses different ones througout his poems.
Stanzas: Sometimes, Poe writes in only one stanza, but he usually writes at least three in his short poems. In his long poems, he writes a great number of lines, but he does not use stanzas.
Meter: Poe commonly does not use meter in a pattern, especially if it is'nt on purpose.
Figurative Language: Poe uses figures such as metaphors and similes to show his meanings in poetry. He also uses alliterations once or twice in his short poems.
Full transcript