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Decoding Shakespearean Language

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by

Laura Wolf

on 13 May 2013

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Transcript of Decoding Shakespearean Language

Step 2: Replace "You" and Add Verb Inflections Step 3: Change the Sentence Structure 1.Replace all the “you” in your sentences with thou or thee
2.Simply add an "est" or "st" to a word

EX. Partner A: Doest thou havest any plans for summer?
Partner B: Yes, I’m gost huntest for Bigfoot.
Partner A: I don’st think Bigfoot exists.
Partner B: Oh, he doest. I’ve beenest researching him forst three months. Most English sentences are subject, verb, noun.

Ex: I ate the sandwich.

Shakespeare rearranges this order.

Ate the sandwich I.
Ate I the sandwich.
The sandwich ate I.
The sandwich I ate. Decoding Shakespeare Understanding Shakespeare's sentences can be
difficult. Let's learn a couple techniques to help
us decode his language. 1.Partner up.
2.Partner A: Write one line of conversation and pass to Partner B
3.Partner B: Write one line of conversation and pass to Partner A 4.Repeat

EX. Partner A: Do you have any plans for summer?
Partner B: Yes, I’m going hunting for Bigfoot.
Partner A: I don’t think Bigfoot exists.
Partner B: Oh, he does. I’ve been researching him
for three months. Step 1: Write a Normal Conversation Step 3: Change the Sentence Structure Partner A: Havest any plans for summer doest thou?
Partner B: Yes, huntest I’m gost for Bigfoot.
Partner A: Exists I don’st think Bigfoot.
Partner B: Oh, doest he. Forest three months researching him I’ve beenest. First, let's watch a video clip.

What story is comedian John Brayan telling using Shakespearean language? Shakespearean
Partner A: Havest any plans for summer doest thou?
Partner B: Yes, huntest I’m gost for Bigfoot.
Partner A: Exists I don’st think Bigfoot.
Partner B: Oh, doest he. Forest three months researching him I’ve beenest. Original
Partner A: Do you have any plans for summer?
Partner B: Yes, I’m going hunting for Bigfoot.
Partner A: I don’t think Bigfoot exists.
Partner B: Oh, he does. I’ve been researching him for three months.
Comparing
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