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Visible Thinking Routines Matrix

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by

Rachel Mainero

on 27 October 2014

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Transcript of Visible Thinking Routines Matrix

Visible thinking routines
See-Think-Wonder
Zoom In
Think-Puzzle-Explore
Chalk Talk
Compass Points
Headlines
CSI
G-S-C-E:
The 4C's
Connect
Extend
Challenge

Tug-of-War
I Used to Think...,
Now I Think...

Red Light, Yellow Light
Circle of Viewpoints
Micro Lab
Step Inside
Sentence
Phrase
Word

Claim-Support-Question
Explanation Game
3-2-1 Bridge
Concept Map
Think about the big ideas and important themes in what you have just read, seen, or heard.

Choose a
color
that you think best represents the essence of that idea
Choose a
symbol
that you think best represents the essence of that idea
Choose an
image
that you think best captures the essence of that idea
a thing that stands for something else
i.e. a dove equals world peace
an equals sign stands for equality
like a photograph or drawing of a scene
Reasoning: Why did you choose this color, symbol, and image?
Routine for Synthesizing and Organizing Ideas

Generate
Generate
a list of words, ideas, phrases, or aspects associated with the topic
Share your generated list with your group members
Add to your list any words, phrases, or ideas you like that your group members share
Sort
Sort
your ideas according to how central or important you think they are

Place the
more important
words near the
center
Place the
less important
ideas toward the
outside
of the page
Connect
Connect
your ideas by
drawing lines
between ideas that share a connection
Briefly explain the connection by writing it out on the line
Elaborate
Select a few central ideas and
elaborate
on them, creating
subcategories
that breaks the ideas into smaller parts
Share the Thinking!
Pair up with another group and share your concept map
Write a headline for this topic or issue that summarizes and captures a key aspect that you feel is significant and important.
Make meaning from a specific text by capturing the heart of the text
Review your text and select a
sentence
that was meaningful to you, that you felt captures a core idea of the text
Then select a phrase that moved, engaged, or provoked you
And finally, select a
word
that captured your attention or struck you as powerful
In your group, discuss your choices. Begin by each sharing your words, then phrases, then sentences. Explain your "what makes you say that" of why you made the specific selections.
The last step is to form conclusions about the text.
What conclusions can you make?
What was the core idea?
Were there any aspects of the text not captured?
Looking at an image of object, record what you
see.
This is something that you can actually put your finger on within the image.
Do not make any interpretations; just record what you physically see.
Looking at the image or object again, record what you
think
is going on.
What do you think this image/object is about?
What interpretations can you make based on your observations?
Look at this image/object one last time, record what makes you
wonder
.
What are you wondering about based on what you have seen and have been thinking?
A Routine for Digging Deeper into Ideas
Step 1: Claim
Make a claim about the topic or issue being explored.
Step 2: Support
What things do you see, feel, or know that show evidence for your claim?
Step 3: Question
Raise a question related to your claim.
What may make you doubt your claim?
What seems left hanging?
What isn't fully explained?
What future ideas or issues for your claim raise?
What do you
think
you know about this topic?
What questions or
puzzles
do you have about this topic?
How might you
explore
the puzzles we have around this topic?
Looking at the topic or question written on the paper in front of you:

What
ideas
come to mind when you consider this idea, question, or problem?
What
connections
can you make to others' responses?
What
questions
arise as you think about the ideas and consider the comments of others.
N
Needs
What else do you
need
to know or find out about this idea or proposition?
E
Excitements
What
excites
you about this idea or proposition?
w
Worries
What
worries
do you have about this idea or proposition?
Stance, Steps,
Suggestions
What is your current
stance
or opinion on this idea or proposition?
What should you next
step
be in your evaluation of the idea or proposition?
What
suggestions
do you have at this point?
S
Considering the idea, question, or proposition before you...
How are the ideas and information presented
connected
to what you already knew?
What new ideas did you get that
extended
your thinking in new directions?
What
challenges

or puzzles have come up in your mind from the ideas and information presented?
Initial Response
Think about the key concepts or topic, identify:
3 words
2 questions
1 metaphor or simile
Identify how your new responses connect to or shifted from your initial response
Bridge
New Response
3 words
2 questions
1 metaphor or simile
Taking a close look at the object you are trying to understand:
Name it.
Name a feature of aspect of the object you notice
Explain it.
What could it be? What role or function might it serve? Why might it be there?
Give reasons
. What make you say that? Or why do you this it happened that way?
Generate alternatives.
What else could it be? And what makes you say that?
Reflect on your current understanding of this topic, and respond to each of these sentence starters:
I used to think...
Now i Think...
Think about a person or an object that is connect to the event or situation you are examining. Place yourself within the event or situation to examine things from this
point of view
.
From this point of view, consider these questions:
What can you
see, observe, or notice
?
What might you
know, understand, hold true, or believe
?
What might you
care deeply about
?
What might you
wonder about or question
?

Include "What makes you say that" for each response.
resources from Making Thinking Visible
by Ron Ritchhart, Mark Church, and Karin Morrison
Full transcript