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Expert of a Poem: Lucy Gray

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Ayesha Jihad

on 8 January 2014

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Transcript of Expert of a Poem: Lucy Gray

Expert of a Poem: Lucy Gray
Ayesha Jihad
You yet may spy the fawn at play,

The hare upon the green;

But the sweet face of Lucy Gray

Will never more be seen.



"To-night will be a stormy night--

You to the town must go;

And take a lantern, Child, to light

Your mother through the snow."


Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray:

And, when I crossed the wild,

I chanced to see at break of day

The solitary child.



No mate, no comrade Lucy knew;

She dwelt on a wide moor,

--The sweetest thing that ever grew

Beside a human door!
"That, Father! will I gladly do:

'Tis scarcely afternoon--

The minster-clock has just struck two,

And yonder is the moon!"



At this the Father raised his hook,

And snapped a faggot-band;

He plied his work;--and Lucy took

The lantern in her hand.
Not blither is the mountain roe:

With many a wanton stroke

Her feet disperse the powdery snow,

That rises up like smoke.



The storm came on before its time:

She wandered up and down;

And many a hill did Lucy climb:

But never reached the town.
The wretched parents all that night

Went shouting far and wide;

But there was neither sound nor sight

To serve them for a guide.



At day-break on a hill they stood

That overlooked the moor;

And thence they saw the bridge of wood,

A furlong from their door.
They wept--and, turning homeward, cried,

"In heaven we all shall meet;"

--When in the snow the mother spied

The print of Lucy's feet.



Then downwards from the steep hill's edge

They tracked the footmarks small;

And through the broken hawthorn hedge,

And by the long stone-wall;

And then an open field they crossed:

The marks were still the same;

They tracked them on, nor ever lost;

And to the bridge they came.



They followed from the snowy bank

Those footmarks, one by one,

Into the middle of the plank;

And further there were none!
--Yet some maintain that to this day

She is a living child;

That you may see sweet Lucy Gray

Upon the lonesome wild.



O'er rough and smooth she trips along,

And never looks behind;

And sings a solitary song

That whistles in the wind.
alliteration of "h"
allusion to other Wordworth poems
alternate rhyme
anaphora
caesura
alliteration of "t"
alliteration of "y"
assonance of "o"
similie
assonance of "u"
symbol: barrier between life & death
auditory imagery showing extent to which the parents were worried
alliteration of "s"
alliteration of "th"
auditory imagery creating morose mood
alliteration of "s"
alliteration of "w"
Summary & Significance
Wordsworth uses the character of Lucy Gray throughout his poems as a “child of nature”. This allusion immediately causes the readers to notice how Lucy Gray recognizes the little aspects of nature around her that an average person would not take into account. After Lucy Gray is not found, Wordsworth says that her spirits will live with her parents and that give them hope along with the rest of the village that she is still alive. Wordsworth, being a romantist, shows that we do not always need physical things to keep us happy or to motivate us through life. In fact, we need the supernatural world to keep us hopeful so that we may live a happy and content life. Also, the speaker indicates that once a person dies, they become a part of nature.
diction connoting to loneliness

assonance of "e"
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
Enjambment
diction that connotes to an innocent
kind hearted person
metaphor: compares her happiness to that of a deer
This characterizes her as a loner child, a girl that was disconnected with humans. However, she is characterized as a sweet, happy girl. Wordsworth implies that humans can find happiness in nature and not solely in the interaction with other humans.
characterizes Lucy as obedient
Lucy has passed on to the other side as is symbolized with the bridge. She left happily, quietly, and became a part of nature. However, this peaceful, contentfully unification was only a result of her love for nature and disinterest in the world of humans. Hence, true happiness can only be found when one truly falls in love with nature.
implies that they were lost
assonance of "o"
setting: sets a gloomy atmosphere
Lantern:The use of an artificial object to "fight" nature (the storm)
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alliteration of "th" and "h"
anaphora
Major Themes:
Nature: the entire poem illustrates the physical world that surrounded Lucy Gray and after her death, she becomes a part of that world.

Death: The death of Lucy Gray is what sets the atmosphere and allows for the audience to clearly see the transformation of the tone of the speaker. The poem surrounded the events prior and following the death of Lucy. This can also be seen as the climax of the poem.

Isolation: Lucy Gray is a sweet girl who Wordsworth characterizes as a "solitary child". Her lack of human interactions is what causes her death to allow her to be easily unified with nature.
Bridge, a man made invention created to "fight" nature. This shows that man cannot successfully create things that go against nature
Alternate rhyme: rhyme that has a form abab. The a's rhyme and the b's rhyme
euphemism
Euphemism refers to the use of a non-offensive or more acceptable term instead of a harsh or unpleasant one
Appositive
Appositive: Direct address
personification
Repetition
alliteration of "t"
assonance "e"
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
alternate rhyme
ironic that he describes her as "living"
diction connoting to danger
assonance of "e"
diction connoting to being lost
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