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CONJUNCTIONS

report.visuals
by

Diane Infante

on 2 March 2013

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Transcript of CONJUNCTIONS

Uses Correlative
CONJUNCTION Subordinating
CONJUCTIONS The Product CONJUNCTIONS Used to: - conjunctions which join sentence patterns of unequal rank SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTION - conjunctions which are used in pairs to join coordinate sentences CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTION either ...... or Conjunctions: word to words Most children like cookies and milk.

phrase to phrase The gold is hidden at the beach or
by the lake side.

clause to clause What you say and what you do are
two different things. EXAMPLES: Coordinating
CONJUNCTION most frequently used: Examples: We looked on top of the refrigerator, where Diane will often hide a bag of chocolate chip cookies. EXAMPLES: - are simple conjunctions which join sentences and sentence parts of equal importance COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS Gonzalez, Infante, Ycot Resources another part of speech
that serves to
link or connect words, phrases or clauses of
equal rank - introduce independent clauses and connect them to the principal/main clause - usually begin a clause that cannot stand alone and joins it to a clause that can stand alone after
although
though
as
as long as
because before
if
for
how
since
so that where
that
until
when
while
unless The fans were quiet while the golfer putted. Although I prefer peaches, I also like strawberries.
Before we blame others for misfortunes or problems that come our way, we should examine first if we ourselves are not to be blamed. Better study your lessons if you want to get good grades. Even though Nika persevered at the calculus exam, she was only adding another F beside her name in Mr. Amamangpang's grade book. Because her teeth were chattering in fear, Ariane clenched her jaw muscle while waiting for her turn to audition. Frequently used: F - for A - and N - nor B - but O - or Y - yet S - so NOTE: for and so, when used as conjunctions can connect only principal/main clauses. They cannot link just parts of a sentence EXAMPLES You come early or we will leave without you. Study hard, so you will pass your test. The dean told the students to request their parents to come, but they did not. both ...... and not only .... but also neither ...... nor whether ...... or EXAMPLES: Both the temperature and the humidity were high yesterday. (Nouns) That coat is neither warm nor comfortable. (Adjectives) Either Eva will come to our house, or we will see her at my cousin’s house. (Sentences)
EXAMPLES: Whether you stay or you go, it's your decision. Not only is Andrew going to Egypt for a month, but also Greece for a couple of weeks. THANK YOU! 1. TO EXPAND SENTENCES
- with the help of conjunctions sentences can be made compound 2. TO CORRECT A COMMA SPLICE
(two ways to correct:)
- joining the sentences by means of semicolon
- by a comma followed by a conjunction Fused sentence (run on)

A sentence in which two or more independent clauses are not properly joined by a semicolon or conjunction EXAMPLES wrong: Mother must be sick
she is always ill-
tempered nowadays. correct: Mother must be sick;
she is always ill -
tempered nowadays.

Mother must be sick, for she is always ill -
tempered nowadays.
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