Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Robert Frost

No description
by

Rebecca Carlson

on 24 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Robert Frost

Robert Frost 1874-1963 Biography Body of Work Poem Analysis Early years He was born in San Francisco, California, in 1874. His father was a teacher and editor of the San Francisco Evening Bulletin. He died in 1885, when Frost was only 11. His family was forced to move to Massachusetts under the patronage of his grandfather. Frost graduated from high school and attended Dartmouth College for two months before returning home to teach and work odd jobs. He grew up in the city but later worked a farm for nine years. His grandfather purchased the farm for him and his wife Elinor, whom he married in 1895, after being rejected at first because she wanted to finish college. After farming, he spent some time as an English teacher before sailing to Great Britain with his family, where he made many important acquaintances, like Edward Thomas and Ezra Pound. At the start of World War I, he returned to America where he taught at various institutions for many years. He emphasized a colloquial approach to language ("the sound of sense") to his students. He never graduated from college but received over forty honorary degrees. He died in 1963 of complications from prostate surgery Historical Context 1874 1963 1900-1910 1885 Father dies of tubercolosis, leaving the family destitute 1894 Frost publishes his first poem "My Butterfly: An Elegy" 1895 Frost marries Elinor Miriam White, his co-valedictorian at Lawrence High School. Frost takes up farming 1912 Frost moves to England. A year later, his first poetry book is published. 1916 Frost returns to America as World War I begins. He settles on a different farm in New Hampshire. He wins his 1st of 4 Pulitzer Prizes in 1923. Frost dies in Boston at the age of 88. 1938 His wife Elinor dies from a heart attack 1940 His 38-year-old son Carol commits suicide. Frost had 6 children in all. Frost is born Adult Life Style Technique Themes Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Poem Examples
The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference. This is a good example of Frost's frequent use of nature in his poems. He uses the natural world to illustrate human nature. The poem also shows the theme of choices that Frost often uses. Frost likes to discuss decisions that the speakers in his poems are forced to make. Frost's poems also sometimes have a sense of remorse and isolation, which this poem certainly illustrates.
Acquainted with the Night

I have been one acquainted with the night.
I have walked out in rain—and back in rain.
I have outwalked the furthest city light.

I have looked down the saddest city lane.
I have passed by the watchman on his beat
And dropped my eyes, unwilling to explain.

I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet
When far away an interrupted cry
Came over houses from another street,

But not to call me back or say good-bye;
And further still at an unearthly height,
One luminary clock against the sky

Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right
I have been one acquainted with the night. This poem clearly shows the theme of isolation that Frost often uses in his poems. The speaker avoids speaking to the watchman and reflects that the cry he hears is not intended for him. He feels almost invisible. This poem also shows the theme of dissatisfaction that is very pervasive in Frost's writing. While many of his poems may seem simple and fairly lighthearted, they usually have more dismal implications. It also contrasts the city with the natural world, represented by the moon. Finally, it furthers the theme of passing time and regret that Frost uses often. Subject This poem, though seemingly simple, addresses complex psychological tensions. The central conflict is between obligations to others ("promises") and becoming immersed in the beauty of the woods. Speaker The speaker is probably a middle-aged male with a family waiting for him at home. He enjoys nature and beauty but is also responsible and feels some guilt for stopping to enjoy the woods. Diction The diction is simple and imitates the colloquial speech of normal conversation. The speech is casual but does not use slang or idioms. The descriptions are rich in meaning but short and to-the-point, reminiscent of Hemingway's iceberg technique.
"Promises" is also interesting because it has a more positive connotation than "obligations" would. Out of 108 words, only 20 have more than one syllable. Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep. Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep. Imagery Frost uses rich imagery to convey the speaker's sensations. He mostly uses sight, but he also uses auditory imagery in the third stanza. Figurative language The poem is mostly literal; however, in the last stanza "miles to go before I sleep" can be interpreted both figuratively and literally. Figuratively, sleep often refers to death so Frost could be saying "many years to live before I die." Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep. Tone The poet is sympathetic to the speaker's desire to enjoy the beauty of nature but also approves of his decision to leave, though not without regret. Sound The poem is euphonious and moves slowly to give the sense of a lulling winter evening. There are many alliterations. All four verses of the last stanza end with punctuation, which gives a slower, more melodic end to the poem. Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep. Rhythm The poem is in closed form. It has four Rubaiyat stanzas (that is, four four-lined stanzas with rhyme schemes of AABA). Frost uses iambic tetrameter in this poem. Therefore, each line has eight syllables that alternate between stressed and unstressed. Title Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening The title, like the poem, is straightforward and literal. It is interesting that Frost says "stopping by woods", not "stopping in the woods", which implies impermanence and emphasizes that the speaker is on the outside looking in. Central Purpose In this poem, Frost addresses the concept of responsibility and the constant tension between contemplation of beauty and obligations to society, which affects us all. Though the man continues on and accepts his duties, he does take the time to enjoy the peaceful scene. Body of work It is uncertain as to how many poems Robert Frost published. Some sources say that he wrote 105, while some say the number is as high as 143. He may have written more than he published. He had 29 books (mostly of poetry), and wrote 4 one-act plays: The Bond, The Death of the Hired Man, The Housekeeper, and The Witch of Coös. Robert Frost used both rhymed verse and blank verse, but never free verse. A quote from Frost reads, “I would sooner write free verse as play tennis with the net down”, which implies that he thinks
that free verse is too simple to use in poetry. His poems, while in iambic pentameter, always tried to simulate a standard conversation. He didn't really believe in trying to confuse the reader with deep ambiguity. Frost used the structure of his poems to his advantage. He would use the rhyming of the poem to set a tone for the poem. If the poem was meant to be serious, it would have a rigid rhyming structure. If it was meant to be lazy, or sound tired, the rhyming did not have a concrete structure. He also used simplistic words that the common man could understand. Many of Frost's poems consisted of taking a beautiful natural setting and connecting it to human beings
in some way, shape, or form. These could possibly be either basic observations written down in poetry
form, or a critical analysis of the people around them in the hopes that the poems he wrote might
change someone’s life. Robert Frost lived from before the latter portion of the 19th and through the majority of the 20th century. Because his life spanned the transition of one literary movement to the next, his work stands at the intersection of two opposing literary movements. On one hand, Frost tended to take from the regionalists, realists, and naturalists, ideas about nature and the country as well as much of their traditional structure of poetry in the form of the traditional meter and the occasional rhyming verse. On the other, he also took many of the modernist themes, ideas, and poem structure of his 20th century contemporaries and melded them in with the previous generation’s ideas about poetry to create his own unique brand of poetry that toed the line between traditional and contemporary. This “Frostian,” poetic style is very evident in “Desert Places,” where he utilizes traditional iambic tetrameter with an AABA rhyme scheme to help convey the isolation felt by the speaker in his descent into the internal chaos of depression and madness. That is to say, that the traditional poetry structure of AABA and the iambic tetrameter help to enrich his language and further suggest the depths of his isolation through the isolation of Line B in each of his four stanzas in his poem. Frost uses a traditional rhyme scheme to convey contemporary ideas. Nature Communication In Frost's poems, communication is presented as the only possible escape from isolation and despair. Unfortunately, Frost also makes it clear that communication is extremely difficult to achieve. The reader is often left with the knowledge that communication could have saved the characters from their isolation. Yet, because of an unwillingness to take the steps necessary to create a relationship with another person, the characters are doomed. Everyday Life Frost is very interested in the activities of everyday life, because it is this side of humanity that is the most "real" to him. Even the most basic act in a normal day can have numerous hidden meanings that need only to be explored by a poetic mind. Frost believes that the use of everyday life in his works allowed for connection between the reader and the speaker. Isolation of the Individual The majority of the characters in Frost's poems are isolated in one way or another. Even the characters who show no sign of depression or loneliness are still presented as detached from the rest of society, isolated because of their unique perspective. Frost suggests that basic human interaction can counteract these feelings of isolation. Duty Duty is a very important value in the rural communities of New England, so it is not surprising that Frost employs it as one of the primary themes of his poetry. Frost often describes conflicts between desire and duty as if the two were mutually exclusive; in order to support his family, a farmer must acknowledge his responsibilities rather than indulge in his personal desires. Rationality and Imagination The hardworking people whom Frost describes in his poetry are forced to choose between rationality and imagination; the two cannot exist simultaneously. It's common for adults in Frost's poems to maintain their rationality, yet there are moments where childish optimism shines through.
Full transcript