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Poetic Terms and Devices

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by

Rachael Furman

on 31 October 2014

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Transcript of Poetic Terms and Devices

Vocabulary Unit 4
Poetic Terms and Devices

Alliteration
Consonance
Enjambment
Onomatopoeia
Shift
Verse
Allusion
Assonance
Caesura
End Stop
Extended
Metaphor
Meter
Rhyme
Rhythm
Stanza
the repetition of the beginning sounds of nearby words.

EXAMPLE
P
eter
P
iper
p
icked a
p
eck of
p
ickled
p
eppers.

T
ick
T
ock
the repetition of inner vowel sounds of nearby words that do not rhyme.

EXAMPLE
I m
a
de my w
a
y to the l
a
ke.

Hear the m
e
llow w
e
dding b
e
lls.
the repetition of the inner consonant sounds of nearby words that do not rhyme.

EXAMPLE
I dropped the lo
c
ket in the thi
c
k mud.

The do
v
e mo
v
ed abo
v
e the wa
v
es.
a reference to a mythological, literary, or historical person, event, or thing
EXAMPLE

They were as in love as
Romeo and Juliet
.
a break in a line of poetry, usually shown with a dash (-) or double dash (--). A caesura tells the reader to pause.
EXAMPLE

I'm nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there's a pair of us
--
don't tell!
They'd advertise
--
you know!

(Emily Dickinson)
when a complete thought in a poem ends at the end of the line (there is usually a comma, semicolon or period at the end of the line)
when a complete thought in a poem continues from one line to the next
A comparison between two unlike things continues throughout many sentences in a paragraph or lines in a poem.

Sometimes the comparison will take the WHOLE poem to complete!
The formal pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a poem
when a word sounds like what it means
EXAMPLE

Crash! Meow Gurgle
repetition of identical or similar sounds.
EXAMPLE

air chair beware
the "beat" of a poem in GENERAL terms
EXAMPLE

iambic pentameter
(a pattern of unstressed then stressed syllables)
EXAMPLE

A poem could be
fast
or
slow
.
an intentional change

A
shift
can be a change in tone, mood, point of view, setting, rhyme, meter...

This list goes on!
A group of lines in a poem.

Hint: Think of a stanza as
similar to
a paragraph within a piece of writing.
poetry in general (as opposed to prose)

OR

a specific line in a poem
A
rhyme scheme
is a pattern created using rhymes
Full transcript