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E3: Realism

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john meehan

on 15 April 2014

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Transcript of E3: Realism

1850's-1915
1790's - 1850's
1890
1845
1908
Realism
Naturalism
Regionalism
A branch of realism that emphasizes a specific geographic setting.

It attempts to accurately reproduce the speech, behavior, and attitudes of the people who live in that region.
aims to depict life as accurately as possible without idealizing or romanticizing it. Avoided anything exotic, sensational, or overly dramatic.
Romanticism
5. Rapid industrialization
Realism
Major Themes:
Inspiration

Subjectivity (feelings > facts)

The primacy of the individual
Major Themes:
Ordinary Reality
"Verisimilitude"
Middle Class
Industry
New Technology
Science
Details
Facts
1915-1946
Modernism
verisimilitude (n):
VERISIMILITUDE (n.):
the quality of being true or real
Realism
is a reaction to the changing world of the 1800s.

With the advent of new technology and information, many writers felt tired of how overblown, out of touch, and "artificial" art and literature had become.

As a result, they sought to explore more true-to-life and authentic human experience.
So why the change?
Realism's focus:
(hint: think Latin! "Veritas!")
(do you see a familiar word here?)
Major American Literary Movements:
How does the fictional story of Peyton Farquhar benefit from the conventions of realism?
What roles do regionalism and realism play in the Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass?
What are some of the hidden sub-themes of realism that we start to see in London's text?
transcendentalism
dark
romanticism
romanticism
Native Americans
(before 1500 A.D.)
(1472-1750)
Puritanism
Colonialism &
Enlightenment
(1750-1800)
Major Themes:
Logic and science

American Independence

Liberty and freedom
Key Works:
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
(Ben Franklin)

The Crisis
(Thomas Paine)

Speech to the Virginia Convention
(Patrick Henry)
Key Works:
The Raven
(Edgar Allan Poe)

Song of Myself
(Walt Whitman)

Because I Could Not Stop for Death
(Emily Dickinson)


Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
(Mark Twain)

The Scarlet Letter
(Nathaniel Hawthorne)

Moby Dick
(Herman Melville)
Walden
(Henry David Thoreau)

Self Reliance
(Ralph Waldo Emerson)
poetry
fiction
non-fiction
Major Themes:
Religion

Moral behavior

Salvation vs. savagery
Major Themes:
Creation stories

Oral tradition

Myth and symbolism
Key Works:
"Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"
(Jonathan Edwards)

"Of Plymouth Plantation"
(William Bradford)

"A Narrative of Captivity"
(Mary Rowlandson)
The American Revolution
(1775-1783)
The Civil War
(1881-1865)
World War I
(1914-1918)
regionalism
naturalism
realism
The three main branches of
REALISM:

American Realism
(1850s-1915)

1895
After reading this story, what do you start to notice about the overall style of realism?
p. 465
p. 490
p. 500
p. 546
Key Works of American Realism
1. What temperature does the man THINK it is outside? What temperature does the reader (and the dog) KNOW it really is outside?

2. Why does the man feel the sudden need to build a fire?

3. What causes the man's fire from question #2 to go out?

4. Why does the man think about the dog after the fire goes out?

5. What happens to the man at the end of the story? What happens to the dog at the end of the story?
1. The Civil War
2. Expansion of the railroads
3. Invention of the telegraph
4. Mass immigration
6. Agrarian --> Urban
PRETTY MUCH BROUGHT AN END TO "ROMANTICISM"
WHAT DO YOU THINK "REALISM" ATTEMPTED TO BRING IN IT'S PLACE?
1861
1865
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war; we are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting place of those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this, but in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground.

The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or to detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here; but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work that they have thus far so nobly carried on. It is rather for us here to be dedicated to the great task remaining before us; that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain. That the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom, and that the government of the people, by the people and for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS
p. 514
Major Themes:
Creation and destruction

Loss and waste

"Make it new"
Key Works:
The Great Gatsby
(F. Scott Fitzgerald)

A Farewell to Arms
(Ernest Hemingway)

As I Lay Dying
(William Faulkner)
MUSIC
"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot"
"Go Down, Moses"
"Follow the Drinking Gourd"
p. 481-482
What is the value or merit of...
?
Frederick Douglass
p. 479
The Battle with Mr. Covey
p. 465
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
My Bondage and
My Freedom
The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass
This Weekend's HW:
Read
Turn In
One paragraph reflection on
"Song of the South" (1947)
SLAVE NARRATIVES
Harriet A. Jacobs
Frederick Douglass
Jim
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
p. 471
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
p. 465
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
REALISM
vs.
ROMANTICISM
EVERYONE HAS A
EVERYONE HAS A
Frederick Douglass' "Battle With Mr. Covey" is an example of a man pushed to the point of no return.
IMAGINE YOU WERE A SLAVE
WHAT WOULD BE YOUR BREAKING POINT?
TONIGHT'S HOMEWORK:
Some critics argue that Jacobs' story is too melodramatic and romanticized. Others believe that Frederick Douglass' use of elevated language makes his account inauthentic to the average slave's experience.
WHICH SLAVE NARRATIVE IS A BETTER EXAMPLE OF "REALISM?" DEFEND YOUR ANSWER.
Kate Chopin
What would you do if you suddenly came into posession of...
$15
how about...
$433
"A Pair of Silk Stockings" (p. 569)
social commentary

early feminism

realism /
naturalism
What is meant by the ending of this story?
A branch of realism that attempts to analyze human behavior as a scientist would.

To a Naturalist...
Human beings are totally subject to the natural laws of the universe; like animals, they lived crudely, by instinct, unable to control their own destinies.
p. 570
1894
How does the fictional story of Mrs. Sommers affected by the cultural attitudes of Naturalism?
By Mark Twain
"The Celebrated Jumping Frog
of Caleveras County"
p. 526
frame narrative
regionalism
realism
There will be a quiz on Monday
BRING TEXTBOOK *and* HUCK FINN TO MONDAY'S CLASS
NATURE
what do you think of when you hear the word
"The South"
what comes to mind when you think of
FRAME NARRATIVE
a "story within a story" where

ONE NARRATOR re-tells the story that A SECOND NARRATOR had told him/her.
(it's kind of like the game "telephone")
When he's not washing windows or folding clothing, Father Francis fixes picture frames for the poor people of Portugal who prefer paintings over portraits.
6. Who is Dan'l Webster?
7. Who is Jim Smiley?
8. Who is Andrew Jackson?
9. Who is Simon Wheeler?
10. What is the narrator's name?
THE CELEBRATED JUMPING FROG OF CALAVERAS COUNTY
TO BUILD A FIRE
THE LOWEST ANIMAL
By Mark Twain
p. 535
ROMANTICISM
REALISM
NATURALISM
REGIONALISM
WEDNESDAY:
TONIGHT'S HOMEWORK:
REALISM UNIT EXAM
10 Quote Identifications
The Gettysburg Address

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge

A Pair of Silk Stockings

A Mystery of Heroism

To Build a Fire

Man is the Lowest Animal

The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County
Abraham Lincoln (514)

Frederick Douglass (465)

Harriet A. Jacobs (471)
Steven Crane (500)
Ambrose Bierce (490)
Kate Chopin (569)
Jack London (546)
Mark Twain (526)
Mark Twain (535)
Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind,
Because your lover threw wild hands toward the sky
And the affrighted steed ran on alone,
Do not weep.
War is kind.

Hoarse, booming drums of the regiment,
Little souls who thirst for fight,
These men were born to drill and die.
The unexplained glory flies above them.
Great is the battle-god, great, and his kingdom--
A field where a thousand corpses lie.

Do not weep, babe, for war is kind.
Because your father tumbles in the yellow trenches,
Raged at his breast, gulped and died,
Do not weep.
War is kind.

Swift blazing flag of the regiment,
Eagle with crest of red and gold,
These men were born to drill and die.
Point for them the virtue of slaughter,
Make plain to them the excellence of killing
And a field where a thousand corpses lie.

Mother whose heart hung humble as a button
On the bright splendid shroud of your son,
Do not weep.
War is kind!
WAR IS KIND
Stephen Crane (508)
"Why didn’t you send for me sooner?" I say.

"Hit was jest one thing and then another," he says. "That ere corn me and the boys was aimin’ to git up with, and Dewey Dell a-takin’ good keer of her, and folks comin’ in, a-offerin’ to help and sich, till I jest thought…"

"Damn the money," I say. "Did you ever hear of me worrying a fellow before he was ready to pay?"

- Dr. Peabody
He is looking at me. He dont say nothing; just look at me with them queer eyes of hisn that makes folks talk. I always say it aint never been what he done so much or said or anything so much as how he looks at you. It’s like he had got inside of you, someway. Like somehow you was looking at yourself and your doings outen his eyes.

- Dewey Dell
My mother is a fish.
Get ready for Faulkner...
page 719
- Vardaman
Full transcript