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Decrease in timed balance testing with aging

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Amy Dollarhite

on 21 April 2015

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Transcript of Decrease in timed balance testing with aging

Variables:
What was this study about?
Methods:
Methods continued:
How these results are important in the physical therapy field:
Tests they performed:
References:
Bohannon, Richard W., Patricia A. Larkin, Amy C. Cook, James Gear, and Juilo Singer. "Decrease in Timed Balance Test Scores with Aging." Decrease in Timed Balance Test Scores with Aging. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2015.
Results:
To calculate the data they calculated the minimum, first quartile, median, third quartile, maximum, number of observations, proportion of observations less than 30 seconds, mean and standard deviation.
After calculating the data the researchers concluded that all of the subjects could perform the both leg balance test for thirty seconds within their five time trials, however when testing the single leg balance test not all of the subjects could do the balance test for thirty seconds.
. The mean for the single leg balance test diminished with the age of the subjects. All the subjects that were younger than forty five balanced on one leg for thirty seconds with their eyes opened. No subject over seventy years of age could balance more than thirteen seconds on one leg with eyes closed, while seventy five percent of the subjects from twenty to thirty-nine years of age could balance on one leg for thirty seconds with eyes closed.
Overall the time and performance on the single leg balance test decreased with patients that were older.
Decrease in timed balance testing with aging
In this study the question they aimed to answer was how aging would affect performance on timed balance tests
The researchers hypothesis was that balance testing scores and performance would decrease with aging
In this study they selected 184 participants (males and females) ranging from the ages of 20 to 79.
In the test the subjects stood on a hard level surface and had to try to do the activity of balancing for thirty seconds while the researcher timed them with a stopwatch. Each person had five attempts to reach the thirty second balancing goal.
The subjects completed the following balancing activities: balancing on two legs with the feet apart and together, first with the eyes opened and then closed, then they performed another balance test by balancing on each leg, first with the eyes opened and then with them closed
If the person could reach thirty seconds then that score was recorded if they could not then their best time out of the five attempts was recorded. If the patient fell, dropped their leg on the single leg stance, or opened their eyes during a closed eye test then the stopwatch was stopped and the time was recorded.
Independent variable: The age of the participants
Dependent variable: The timed balance tests
Balancing on two legs with the feet apart and together, first with the eyes opened and then closed
Balancing on each leg, first with the eyes opened and then with them closed
When applying this study to real life, physical therapists must realize when they are performing balance testing with patients that they need to take a patients age into account because their age will effect their overall performance. When performing balance tests in the clinic physical therapists should be aware that elderly patients could fall more easily than younger patients, and older patients will also have lower scores on balance tests.
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