Loading presentation...
Prezi is an interactive zooming presentation

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Raven

No description
by

Abby Morrison

on 23 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Raven

Analyzing
"The Raven" "The Raven" Stanzas 1-7 Analyzing Stanza 1 Analyzing Stanza 2 "All my soul within me burning" means and shows: What Does the Speaker Repeatedly do Throughout the Poem so Far? Predictions for Next Stanza Rhyme Scheme "And each separate dying ember wrought it's ghost upon the floor" is: Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore –
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door –
"'Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door –
Only this and nothing more."

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore –
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore –
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me – filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating,
"'Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door –
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; –
This it is and nothing more."

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
"Sir," said I, "or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you" – here I opened wide the door; –
Darkness there and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, "Lenore?"
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, "Lenore!" –
Merely this and nothing more. Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
"Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou," I said, "art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore –
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!"
Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."

Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning – little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blest with seeing bird above his chamber door –
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as "Nevermore."

But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered –
Till I scarcely more than muttered "Other friends have flown before –
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before."
Then the bird said "Nevermore."

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
"Doubtless," said I, "what it utters is its only stock and store
Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster
Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore –
Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore
Of 'Never – nevermore.'"

But the Raven still beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore –
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt and ominous bird of yore
Meant in croaking "Nevermore." Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore –
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door –
"'Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door –
Only this and nothing more." What is the time and setting of the poem so far?
What is the speaker doing?
Are there any words that you don't know?
Can you guess what they mean? Time and Setting Set at midnight.
The speaker is in a"chamber" within a house.
He is reading "forgotten lore(books)", which must mean that there are multiple books around him. What is the Speaker Doing? He is reading books in his chamber.
He is also very tired, and drifting off.
The speaker ignores a soft rap at his door because the quietness of the knock makes it seem not at all urgent. Definitions of Difficult Words: Dreary: Dull, bleak, and lifeless; depressing
Pondered: To think about something carefully, especially before deciding or concluding.
Weary: Feeling or showing tiredness.
Quaint: Attractively unusual or old-fashioned(odd, strange, weird, peculiar)
Volume: One text document(book) in a series of documents which often relate to each other.
Lore: Facts, traditions, or beliefs about a particular subject. Stanzas 8-18 Analyzing Stanza 10 Analyzing Stanza 16 Analyzing Stanza 18 Does it mean anything when the raven sits on the goddess of wisdom? What becomes of the speaker at the end of the poem? Physical description of Raven: The speaker's reaction to the raven telling him he will never hold Lenore again Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
"Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore –
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; –
'Tis the wind and nothing more!"

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door –
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door –
Perched, and sat, and nothing more. This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom's core;
This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
On the cushion's velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o'er,
But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o'er,
She shall press, ah, nevermore!

Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen
censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
"Wretch," I cried, "thy God hath lent thee – by these angels he hath sent thee
Respite – respite and nepenthe, from thy memories of Lenore;
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!"
Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."

"Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil! – prophet still, if bird or devil! –
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted –
On this home by Horror haunted – tell me truly, I implore –
Is there – is there balm in Gilead? – tell me – tell me, I implore!"
Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."

"Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil – prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us – by that God we both adore –
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore –
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore."
Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."

"Be that word our sign in parting, bird or fiend!" I shrieked, upstarting –
"Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken! – quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!"
Quoth the Raven "Nevermore."

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the
floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the
floor
Shall be lifted – nevermore! Analyzing Stanza 6 Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow – sorrow for the lost Lenore –
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore –
Nameless here for evermore. Who is Lenore?
Is there a rhyme scheme in this stanza? What is it?
What poetic device is, "And each separate dying ember wrought it's ghost upon the floor." What does it mean? Who is Lenore? She is the speaker's
significant other.
Lenore has recently died.
She, in the speaker's
opinion, is "rare" and
"radiant" Remember, December, ember.
Wrought, sought, lost.
Floor, Lenore, evermore.
Morrow, borrow, sorrow.
A, A, A, B, C, D, B, D, D, B, C, C A metaphor.
It means that the embers in a fireplace are turning into ash.
The ash is "like" a ghost. What do you think "all my soul within me burning" means? Why do you think this?
What does the speaker repeatedly do throughout this poem so far?
Can you predict what is going to happen in the next stanza? How? Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
"Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore –
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; –
'Tis the wind and nothing more!" That the speaker does not feel any comfort at knowing where the noise is coming from.
He is steadily and increasingly becoming more and more frightened at this noise. He continuously is trying to reassure and calm himself down.
He also forms reasonable explanations for the odd noises he keeps hearing (ie. the wind, a visitor). Example:
I predict that a raven will be
at the window. I guessed
this because the poem is
titled "The Raven" and the
speaker is about to open a
window, which a raven is
able to fly in from, unlike
when the speaker heard the tapping from the door. But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered –
Till I scarcely more than muttered "Other friends have flown before –
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before."
Then the bird said "Nevermore." What does the speaker mean by "as if his soul in that one word he did outpour"?
Without a physical description, what do you think the raven looks like, using hints from this stanza and the tone of the poem?
In this stanza the speaker refers to the raven as his friend. Why do you think the speaker does this? What does the speaker mean by, "As if his soul in that one word he did outpour"? He means that it seems like the feeling in the word "nevermore" came from the entire birds soul.
That when the raven spoke the word he revealed his entire self and existence to the speaker. dark
black
large
evil
demonic
lurking
intimidating
royal
serious
haunting By: Edgar Allan Poe Why does the speaker think of the raven as his friend? The speaker thinks of the raven as his friend because the bird is someone in his chamber, "talking" to him. The speaker is very lonely and it doesn't seem like anybody has been talking to him in his chamber for a while.
The raven is the closest thing the speaker has to a friend right about now, in his lonely, and depressing state.
The speaker could be a little bit mentally unstable because of Lenore's death, and does and says odd things.
The speaker could also be saying that the raven is "like" his friends, and will fly away and abandon him.
"Prophet!" said I, "thing of evil – prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us – by that God we both adore –
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore –
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore."
Quoth the Raven "Nevermore." In this stanza the speaker is yelling, screaming, and raging mad. What, do you think, caused this madness?
Who's soul is the speaker talking about when he says "Tell this soul with sorrow laden"?
What do you think the speaker's reaction will be to the raven telling him that he will never again, hold Lenore, not even in heaven? And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted – nevermore! What caused the speaker's madness? The death of his significant other, Lenore.
His exhaustion from staying up past midnight, reading books.
The idea of having no hope and never being able to hold Lenore again.
The actual Raven. Who's soul is the speaker talking about when he says "Tell this soul with sorrow laden"? He is referring to his own soul
The way he says it, his soul is separate from himself, like he cannot control it.
Another way to tell that he is talking about his soul is because he says "this soul with sorrow laden", which means a soul full of sorrow. This soul can only be his, because he is the only character in the poem that is full of sorrow. How the time and setting have changed. The time has changed.
The poem is now talking about the present, not 1845.
"And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting".
The raven has turned into some kind of statue, and sits upon Pallas' bust forever. The speaker could become furious with the Raven.
The man could also sink into a deeper state of depression.
He could give into his despair. The author could have meant to show that the bird is actually wise, the spot it perches on, being a symbol.
Proof that the bird is actually wise could be shown when he traps the speaker's soul. The raven would have known how crazy the man was getting and knew he had to be locked up.
OR...
The situation could be an oxymoron or commparison and be showing how the raven is the total opposite of the goddess of wisdom. The speaker's soul has become trapped within the Raven's shadow.
The speaker's body could still be with his soul, like in the picture or could have disappeared. It's all up to your imagination. Theme &
Connections Poetic Quality Questions Character & Plot: Characters & Plot Theme & Connections Poetic Quality Answers a) Who are the characters in the poem? b) What traits do certain characters display? Can a lesson be learned from this poem? d) Do you trust the speaker? Do you think he gives us an accurate version of reality, or is it possible that he is making up or distorting some of these things? Can you connect this poem to society? a)Find a poetic device(metaphor, simile, personification), and explain its purpose and effectiveness a) The tone of this poem is very depressed and miserable throughout, for example, the author describing the curtains in his chamber as "sad". It is also fearful and afraid when the speaker wonders what the knocking at his door would be, and finally, the tone is angry and hating when the man orders the raven to get out of his chamber. a) There are 3 major characters within this poem. The Raven, the speaker, and Lenore. It is arguable whether the raven and Lenore are characters or not, the raven being an animal that only speaks one word, and Lenore being dead, but they are major things within the poem. What is the tone of the poem? b) The Raven has no lesson in
particular . Only, that dreadful and devastating events in people's lives can do extreme damage to them, and their life overnight. c) This poem can connect to the correctional and punishment institutions(jails) in our society. Once a person goes insane, they are locked up in jail or a mental institution for a very long time. In the poem, the speaker starts to go mentally insane, and has his soul trapped for eternity a) "As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door " has an onomatopoeia within it. "Rapping" is the sound that someone knocking on a door would make. This onomatopoeia is meant to give readers something to imagine hearing while reading the poem. The sound is also repeated, meant to make it sound as if the noise was all the speaker could think about. b) The main character
presents himself as a brooding
and unstable sort of person. He also cannot handle himself without a woman.
Not many personality traits are revealed about The Raven, just that he is evil and menacing. Finally, Lenore, from the
speaker's memories, seems to have been a a very kind and gorgeous woman. c) The raven could actually be
real, and talking, like in a
fictional-sort of poem, but it is
not likely. The rest of the poem seems too realistic for it. The raven, or just the fact that the raven talks is most likely made up by the speaker in his state of madness and
depression. The poem could be about a man descending into his own
personal hell. Has the time and setting of the poem changed in this stanza? How?
The raven chooses to sit on the statue of Pallas, also known as Athena, a goddess of wisdom. Do you think the author is trying to tell us something about the raven?
What becomes of the speaker at the end of the poem? Does this mean that he died? Explain. By:
Carly and Abby
Full transcript