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Traffic Light invention

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by

Krystle Prough

on 19 March 2013

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Transcript of Traffic Light invention

John Peake Knight Traffic Lights Award: Facts: Born: Died: Married: Member of: Information About the Traffic Light Legion of Honor A sponsor of homeopathy.

A steward of the 1851 Annual Festival aid of the London Homeopathic Hospital.

British Railway engineer. In Nottingham on January 13th, 1828. Margret F. Spier on November 30th, 1865, and had 5 sons. July 23rd, 1886 Management Committee of the London Homeopathic Hospital.

Management Committee of the British Homeopathic Association. The first traffic light was a revolving gas powered lantern with a red and green light.

1912 was the first time electric traffic lights were used.

The first traffic light was installed on Parliament Square in London in December of 1868.

In 1866, a year in which 1,102 people were killed and 1,334 injured on roads in London, John proposed a signaling system based on railway signals. John became superintendent of the South Eastern Railway at age 25 and then traffic manager of the Brighton line by age 40.

He also specialised in designing signalling systems for Britains growing railroad network. (Which he saw no reason why they couldn't be used on the road.)
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