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Picture Books

Justification to update picture book collection
by

Mandy Gintaut

on 26 November 2012

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Transcript of Picture Books

Picture Books It was 1902 and Beatrix Potter published her first picture book. Now a best-selling classic, The Tale of Peter Rabbit, is one of the many reasons why we have fallen in love with picture books. There are so many new and improved picture books available that NOW is the time to update our picture book collection at Book Lover
Elementary School. Book Lover Elementary is in need of updating our picture book collection. "The picture book is short, and can fit easily into the nooks and crannies of our lives. Five minutes here, 10 minutes there, plenty of time for a complete literary experience” (Walton, 2011). The complete literacy experience is the learning and discussion that brings the picture book alive and unforgettable. For example using the book, The Dot, by Peter H. Reynolds, takes no more than ten minutes to read, but as a teacher you can guarantee that the meaning in the text can be discussed for an entire lesson. Achieving Information Literacy states that 80-90% of the books should be published in the last 10 years (2003). Our library has 3% of the books published in the last 10 years.
Improvements in technology since the 1980s has produced picture books with better artwork and cleaner pictures (Horning, 2010, p.86).
It is important to update the collection with picture books containing wonderful eye-catching illustrations that beg to be explored (Reading Is Fundamental, n.d. para 2). Picture books continue to be a favorite among teachers and students. It is important we keep our collection up to date. "We owe it to children to introduce them to the best new books and authors available” (Vardell, 2008, p.44). “The read-aloud experience should be so extraordinary that practically as soon as the book is closed, everyone just wants to open it up and do it again” (Johnston & Frazee, 2008, p.11). There is a strong and evident connection that can be made to art after reading The Dot. Reading picture books means exploring art as well (Reading Is Fundamental, n.d., & Walton, 2011). Students are able to create their own Dot.
Furthermore, "it helps us look for meaning in the visual ... visual intelligence is an important skill” (Walton, 2011). Reflecting on the story, The Dot, and many other picture books, "the picture book does more than any other literary format for bonding people with one another. As a child sits on a lap and is read to, as a parent, a grandparent, a teacher, a librarian reads to a child, extremely important connections are made, bonds are formed, generations are brought together” (Walton, 2011). Picture Books for Older Students.
"Teachers searching for books to support the discussion of social issues such as drugs, homelessness, and suicide will find picture books that present these difficult topics in a powerful format that is meaningful and accessible to all students” (Giorgis, 1999, p. 52). Because picture books are short, all messages, knowledge, ideas expressed in a picture books must be boiled down to their essence. They must be presented in a way that is impossible to misunderstand. If you want to learn a difficult subject, start with a picture book. (Walton, 2011
“A student seeking background on the Sioux tribe, for example, could attempt to wade through a difficult nonfiction text, encyclopedia entry, or web site intended for more mature readers. Or, this same student could access similar information through three or four picture books whose illustrations would aid in deciphering and extending difficult terms and concepts.” (Schoch, 2012)
“More experienced readers can learn how to cross-reference the text and pictures in order to "read between the lines." Choose books whose illustrations convey meaning not contained in the text, and help older readers play detective by going back and forth between the story and the pictures.” (RIF, para.13) Because picture books are short, all messages, knowledge, ideas expressed in a picture books must be boiled down to their essence. They must be presented in a way that is impossible to misunderstand. If you want to learn a difficult subject, start with a picture book. (Walton, 2011
“A student seeking background on the Sioux tribe, for example, could attempt to wade through a difficult nonfiction text, encyclopedia entry, or web site intended for more mature readers. Or, this same student could access similar information through three or four picture books whose illustrations would aid in deciphering and extending difficult terms and concepts.” (Schoch, 2012)
“More experienced readers can learn how to cross-reference the text and pictures in order to "read between the lines." Choose books whose illustrations convey meaning not contained in the text, and help older readers play detective by going back and forth between the story and the pictures.” (RIF, para.13) Because picture books are short, all messages, knowledge, ideas expressed in a picture books must be boiled down to their essence. They must be presented in a way that is impossible to misunderstand. If you want to learn a difficult subject, start with a picture book. (Walton, 2011
“A student seeking background on the Sioux tribe, for example, could attempt to wade through a difficult nonfiction text, encyclopedia entry, or web site intended for more mature readers. Or, this same student could access similar information through three or four picture books whose illustrations would aid in deciphering and extending difficult terms and concepts.” (Schoch, 2012)
“More experienced readers can learn how to cross-reference the text and pictures in order to "read between the lines." Choose books whose illustrations convey meaning not contained in the text, and help older readers play detective by going back and forth between the story and the pictures.” (RIF, para.13) Eve Bunting's, Fly Away Home and DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan's, Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen expose students to the issue of homelessness. A student seeking background on the Sioux tribe, for example, could attempt to wade through a difficult nonfiction text, encyclopedia entry, or web site intended for more mature readers. Or, this same student could access similar information through three or four picture books whose illustrations would aid in deciphering and extending difficult terms and concepts (Schoch, 2012). A Picture Book of Sitting Bull by David A. Adler provides a brief biography of a Sioux Chief. Picture Books for Older Students
Topics and learning experiences become more difficult as students move through grade levels.
Because picture books are short, all messages, knowledge and ideas expressed in a picture book must be boiled down to their essence. They must be presented in a way that is impossible to misunderstand. If you want to learn a difficult subject, start with a picture book (Walton, 2011).
Picture Books for Non-Reading Students
Children love to read picture books. They love to read them over and over again. Students who are not able to read the words are able to read the pictures. "The pictures allow a not- yet-reading child to make his or her own way through the narrative of a picture book” (Johnston & Frazzle, 2011, p.13).
Children don't need to be taught how to read picture books as they are naturally good at it, "and in fact they are way better at it than grownups” (Johnston & Frazzle, 2011, p.11).
“They are privately and independently learning how stories work. They are ‘reading’” (Johnston & Frazzle, 2011, p.13). "Some picture books are so sophisticated and ground breaking in their content or their art, they are really more appropriate for older readers” (Vardell, 2008, p.42). Wordless Picture Books
Challenge children to use their imaginations to create or narrate their own text.
Provides an excellent opportunity for storytelling, writing captions, developing oral fluency, assessing visual literacy, and developing ESL skills (Vardell, 2008, p.46). Picture Books and Reading Skills
Break from novels, read in one sitting (Reading Is Fundamental, n.d., para.4).
Text is short, every word counts, predictable structure (Horning, 2010, p.88).
The shorter picture books provides a more controlled arena for examination and discussion (Schoch, 2012).
Successfully employ story elements which will increase the reader's comprehension (Schoch, 2012). "What makes art and literature so interesting is that it presents us with unusual things that encourage us to ask questions about what we already know. It’s about returning us, especially we older readers, to a state of unfamiliarity, offering an opportunity to rediscover some new insight through things we don’t quite recognize (as it was for all of us in the very beginning).

This is perhaps what reading and visual literacy are all about - and what picture books are good for - continuing that playful inquiry we began in childhood, of using imagination to find significance and meaning in those ordinary, day-to-day experiences that might otherwise remain unnoticed” (Tan, n.d.). Character Education in Picture Books
“When illustrations reflect people, objects, and situations familiar to children, the images help validate their emotions and experiences. The process of making an emotional connection can help a child learn empathy and compassion for others” (Reading Is Foundamental, n.d). This lends itself very nicely to using picture books for character eduction programs. http://www.schooltube.com/video/b0a58634d9094053a93d/Picture%20Book%20Month - Click the link below for a great video!
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- If the music from this prezi is too loud, come back to this prezi and click on any other tab of our project for the prezi to stop.
- Enjoy the video and we hope for our next project prezi and music will be more compatible with each other! Reference List: Images found through Prezi Google Search Music:
teru.(cc2009). Goodbye War, Hello Peace. Retrieved from
http://dig.ccmixter.org/music_for_film_and_video?dig-query=good%20bye%20war%20hello%20peace. (we have one more slide for you...)
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