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Raising an iToddler

From Conception to Toddlerhood
by

Poppy Gibson

on 6 March 2013

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Transcript of Raising an iToddler

Raising an iToddler From Conception to Toddlerhood Birth to Toddlerhood- and a Future Dystopia? Raising my iToddler From the day he was born, my iToddler enjoyed watching Baby
Einstein DVDs about colours and shapes, enjoyed the 'Talking Tom' cat Android app repeating his parents' voices back in a high-pitched manner, and now loves dancing along to Nursery Rhymes streaming on YouTube.
Is he being raised in a 'digital culture'? Without a doubt. For 9 months, was my son safe in my womb? Yes. Was he safe from technology and the digital culture that envelopes us all? Think again. Technology in the Womb Me, Myself,
and Digital Pregnancy Tests By PG iChildhood and Beyond...
Confronting Fukuyama's Nightmare The most interesting issue raised for me by the EDC MOOC was that of utopia versus dystopia: Francis Fukuyama's ideology, that human nature and human ways of being are under threat by scientific and technological advances, is one we have enjoyed debating via Twitter over recent weeks. The EDC MOOC highlighted the 'unnoticed embeddedness of technology in our every day lives';
certainly from the moment I wake up I reach for my Android phone to check my Facebook
page, the weather forecast, and the TFL website for transport updates before I've even left the safety of my duvet.
One frosty day back in the Autumn of 2010, however, I found myself buying a new digital
device that definitely did NOT go unnoticed by myself or my husband... a digital pregnancy test,
which, to our delight, displayed the word 'pregnant' on its little grey screen. Conclusion Thank you for your time reading my Prezi- I hope you enjoyed this brief review of
raising a toddler in our
digital culture! I see nothing but positive changes ahead in Education as we continue to enhance our teaching and learning with digital devices, and I very much look forward to watching my toddler grow up in our digital world. And this was the first, although seemingly innocent, technology bestowed upon that tiny wee embryo in his first weeks...Here is my presentation outlining the relationship between my 18 month old and technology- my iToddler. By Mrs Gibson Is the ever-embeddedness of technology in our lives really such a bad thing? Is it as 'dangerous' as Fukuyama fears? I don't believe that technology undermines who we are, but in fact enhances us and allows us to explain and express ourselves in ways never before possible, connecting us to others and making our everyday lives.
I do not yet know how my son's iChildhood will turn out. No doubt the iPads and laptops at his future nursery will equip him with IT skills that people of my generation fought to learn in the first years of Secondary school. But these IT skills will, in my opinion, prepare him for a future in an ever-evolving digital world, where his future job will no doubt invole some- if not all- digital input.
Isn't achieving 'equality, freedom and autonomy' not easier with these skills and devices? I would dispute Fukuyama's dystopian ideas with those of a utopian, united
future where technology provides access to information, enabling us,
and re-asserting who we are- being human is using technology. If we are fortunate to live in a society where such digital delights are available, should we
not share them and introduce them to our young? Perhaps many
technologies now do go 'unnoticed' in our everyday lives, but
wouldn't you let your toddler play on your
iPhone if it made them laugh...? Raising my iToddler By PG Fukuyama warns that our human ways of being are threatened by technology as it undermines the basis of our commitment to humanist ideas which underlie many educational philosophies
and approaches to practice, such as
equality, freedom and autonomy. I'm not simply talking about the Ultrasound scans...From playing classical music on my iPod, holding the headphones against my bulging belly, to purchasing a Heart Doppler to listen to his heartbeat in utero (and, of course, bluetoothing the recorded MP3 onto my laptop and emailing it to family members), my little foetus was already being subjected to a number of technologies. The EDC MOOC raises the questions: 'What does it mean to be human within a digital culture, and what does that mean for education?’- digital culture is inevitable but does it result in
utopia or dystopia? Does it make us less human?
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