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Two Argument Models

A presentation on the two major models for constructing arguments: Classical and Rogerian
by

Christopher Yokel

on 20 October 2016

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Transcript of Two Argument Models

Two Argument Models
Constructing Arguments
Once you've come with with a persuasive argument you want to make, how do you construct it in a way that will make sense and appeal to your audience?
Classical Model
A structure formalized by Aristotle,
which utilizes the
deductive approach
.

Five parts:
INTRODUCTION (exordium)
Gain your audience's attention, establish your credibility
MAIN CLAIM (narratio)
Give background or context, state your main point
SUPPORT (confirmatio)
Offer evidence to support your thesis or claim
REFUTATION (refutatio)
Address and refute counterarguments
CONCLUSION (peroration)
Summarize your case and call for some sort of action
Rogerian Model
Created by psychologist Carl Rogers,
designed to achieve consensus.

INTRODUCTION:
Description of issue at hand
SUMMARY OF OPPOSING VIEWS:
Description of your opponent's position
STATEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING:
How you might move toward their view
STATEMENT OF YOUR VIEWS:
Description of your position
STATEMENT OF CONTEXTS:
How they might move towards your view
STATEMENT OF BENEFITS:
How mutual compromise would be beneficial
Full transcript