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SMAS-2016

DELIVERING DISTRICT HEATING BY RECOVERING WASTE HEAT AND BOOSTING WITH INDUSTRIAL HETPUMPS AS HIGH AS 90C
by

dave pearson

on 8 September 2016

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Transcript of SMAS-2016

project 1- evaluating the demand for a networked heating system across the campus.

The campus has a huge energy bill. Not only is this a drain on the finances of the University, with ever increasing pressure to reduce carbon footprint, the real cost is only set to rise.

Campus or district heating systems offer a way of reducing this cost and even reduce the carbon footprint to zero.

The aim of this project is initially to determine the loads of each of the main buildings and then the existing infrastructure in each building. In addition the heat load needs to be determined across as long a period as possible, logged versus ambient temperature.

This will be presented as a 4D map of location, quantity and time of use.

The second part of the project will take this data and the preliminary output from project2 (heat sources) and propose a campus wide system meeting the bulk of the load with large heat pumps sourcing the heat from the river Kelvin. (if driven by renewable energy this will be deemed zero carbon). As this scheme would be eligible for the renewable heat incentive, the support available is adequate to finance such a project over a short period.

The project should conclude with an estimate of capital, and operational cost and therefore present an ROI (return on investment) to be considered by the Estates Director and Finance Director.



NH3 Delivering District Heating
Who are Star?
Drammen
14MW@90C
from Seawater
Founded 1970
300+ team
Privately owned
2050Ready
PROFIT
www.tinyurl.com/SMAS-ENERGY
Dave Pearson
Director
Star Renewable Energy
River Clyde Heat capacity
= Mass Flow * specific heat * Delta T
= 100,000 x 4.2 x 2 kg/s * kJ/kgK * K = kJ/s = kW
= 840,000 kW of heat capacity
Worked example: 10MW district heating in UK
Centralised heat pump
Capital
Gas District Heating
~£4.0M
Usage/pa
4000 hrs
Gas/kWh
Elec/kWh
Efficiency
OPEX/pa
9p/kWh
ROI
4.0
~£0.5M
4000 hrs
4p/kWh
£0.90M
(-44%/+45%)
17.5%
(+25%)

CO2/pa
4,498 T
(-39.3%)
0.85
£1.6M
7,400 T
As the grid cleans this facility is "clean".
~£7.0M
4000 hrs
4p/kWh
0.37e/0.43th
£0.62M
17,120 T
Gas CHP
............................ this facility is "dirty".
14.0%
£3.72Mth
-£3.1Me
470 T
-16650 T
“Setting fire to chemicals like gas should be made a thermodynamic crime,” he said. “If people want heat they should be forced to get it from heat pumps. That would be a sensible piece of legislation.”
Gas
CCGT Electricity


=21 MW of heat capacity..............heat source
PLUS absorbed power typically +1/3
=28 MW..........a fairly conservative estimate

but let's assume 1/3 of this, say 10MW
Project 2 - evaluating the sources of heat available on campus. The principal source being the river Kelvin.

The campus has a huge energy bill. Not only is this a drain on the finances of the University, with ever increasing pressure to reduce carbon footprint, the real cost is only set to rise.

Campus or district heating systems offer a way of reducing this cost and even reduce the carbon footprint to zero.

The aim of this project initially to determine the quantity of heat that could be extracted from the Kelvin. Principally this means measuring flow rate and temperature. Once this data capture is established to record across 3 months, the focus of the project will shift to an assessment of the operation criteria for the heat pump. Dialogue with project will provide preliminary data.

The project will then begin to assess feasibility of distributing heat around the campus. There are several techniques to be considered from high temperature networks at 90C to ambient loops at 15C (each local then drawing heat via a local heat pump.)

The second part of the project will take this data and the preliminary output from project1 (heat sources) and propose a campus wide system meeting the bulk of the load with large heat pumps sourcing the heat from the river Kelvin. (if driven by renewable energy this will be deemed zero carbon). As this scheme would be eligible for the renewable heat incentive, the support available is adequate to finance such a project over a short period.

The project should conclude with an estimate of capital, and operational cost and therefore present an ROI (return on investment) to be considered by the Estates Director and Finance Director.
but what about more local sources?



Electricity £4.3M
Gas £1.9M
Water £1.0M
Heating oil £0.20M

43.0GWh
47.5GWh


Also for heat!
12MW~4000hrs


Cross Sectional Area > 1/2 width x depth
River Kelvin Heat capacity
= River Flow * specific heat * Delta T
= width * depth * flowrate * specific heat * delta T
= (10 * 0.5 * 0.5)*1000 x 4.2 x 2
RHI £0.035/kWh * 10,000 *4,000 = £1.4M/a for 20 years Nil
2000 l/s = 120MW
1GW
30 million liters per day
= 22MW of heatpump
Thank you.
dpearson@neatpumps.com


Ground source
Closed loop (vertical and horizontal)............10kW per borehole?





Open loop..............20 l/s per pair of aquifer bore holes......840kW.....1.2MW

www.neatpumps.com/futureofheating
Drammen (15% gas/85% HP)
COP 4.0
"UK"Drammen (15% gas/85% HP)
winter?
summer?
CHP 40% Gas 60%
>300GWh delivered heat
at May 2016
85% lower carbon
€10/MWh
2050 Ready?

>300GWh wasted cooling

100% zero carbon
€0/MWh

UK COP 3.0 HP&COOLING
Condensing Boiler
Local GAS CHP
G G G G G G G G G G
H H H H H H H H
E E E e
H H H H
E E E E E E
h h h
CCGT Electricity + Heatpump (COPh 4.0)
E E E E E E
H H H H H H H H
H H H H H H H H
H H H H H H H H
10 units
9 units
3.7 units -plus 4.3 units
6 units
3 units (remote and lower grade)
24 units
Primary Energy Factor
C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C
E E E E E E
24 units COOLING saving
6 units of Electricity
A 2016 "zero carbon" Thermally Integrated Community
www.tinyurl.com/CPH-LCHC-2016
thought leadership?
modeling?

but what?

huge opportunity in where Denmark and others are headed............
not where they have come from!
Zero CO2
Clean Air
The Race to 2050
Right price
Reliable (low risk)
Repeatable
Efficient (grid mgt)
Low barriers
Local jobs
Save the planet?
The race to 2050 Ready
TWO PLANETS FLYING THROUGH SPACE......
28 m3/s
3K
what capacity?
28 m3/s
3K
28,000 * 3 * 4.18
=350,000kW
And that's the heat into the heatpump
So 500MW heat output or more
Powell: 3rd best PB, 3rd fastest reaction
Last!

September- Barrier Busting!!
5000 kg/s
3K
4.18
62,700kW
94,050kW heat
The Energiewende (German for energy transition) is the transition by Germany to a low carbon, environmentally sound, reliable, and affordable energy supply.
Most electrical load is for cooling.....
Energy
Purchase
Contract
usage commitment
utility cost risk
equipment risk
funding
application suitability
off balance sheet
cash positive (now)
step-in right
Full transcript