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English 1101

Purpose Audience Form
by

Jeannie Levy

on 6 November 2014

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Transcript of English 1101

Examining Text:
A Look under the Surface
Political Cartoons &
Facebook Posters

Analysis
Logical Fallacies
Often used to affect
Ethos, Logos, Pathos
"A logical fallacy is, roughly speaking, an error of reasoning. When someone adopts a position, or tries to persuade someone else to adopt a position, based on a bad piece of reasoning, they commit a fallacy...Some logical fallacies are more common than others, and so have been named and defined..." http://www.logicalfallacies.info/

Examples: Red Herring, Straw Man, Slippery Slope, Ad Hominem...

Top 20 Logical Fallacies: http://www.theskepticsguide.org/resources/logicalfallacies.aspx
Context & Allusions
An allusion is a figure of speech that makes a reference to a place, person, or something that happened.

This can be real or imaginary and may refer to anything, including paintings, opera, folk lore, mythical figures, or religious manuscripts.

The reference can be direct or may be inferred, and can broaden the reader’s understanding.

For our purposes, we will focus on pop culture, sporting events, historical events, political events.

Examples: Godfather II and the Fiscal Cliff or the SEC Championship?
Rhetorical Tools
Devices used to manipulate language to effectively communicate the speaker/writer's message to an audience.

From Alliteration "Sally sells seashells by the seashore"
to Zeugma "Fluffy rolled on her back, raised her paws, and meowed to be petted"

http://www.virtualsalt.com/rhetoric.htm
The Rhetorical Pyramid
Analysis
In other words..
.
How do authors communicate?

The Rhetorical Pyramid
Context/Allusions
Logical Fallacies
Rhetorical Tools
A Facebook Poster...
Questionable Cause Fallacy?
What is being said, and what is not?
Another Facebook Poster...
Your initial reaction may depend on your position, but what do you still need to know to analyze this claim?
Pop Culture and Allusion:
http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2012/11/obama-to-republicans-my-offer-is-this-nothing.php
Your turn...
Evaluate ONE of the next slides, EITHER the political cartoon or the Facebook poster ....Please analyze:
The Rhetorical Pyramid
Context/Allusion
The Rhetorical Triangle
Rhetorical Tools
PRACTICE!
"Obama Credits Education With Boosting ‘Mixed Kid’ and ‘Little Black Girl’ to White House" -- ABC News

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2012/09/obama-credits-education-with-boosting-mixed-kid-and-little-black-girl-to-white-house/
Most common elements used:
Symbolism – using an object to stand for an idea
Captioning & labels – used for clarity and emphasis
Analogy – a comparison between two unlike things that share some characteristics
Irony – the difference between the way things are & the way things are expected to be
Exaggeration – overstating or magnifying a problem or a physical feature or habit:
Full transcript