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Sonnet 71 Brad Pollick

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brad pollick

on 7 December 2009

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Transcript of Sonnet 71 Brad Pollick

"At funerals during the Renaissance, one could pay to have the "passing-bell" rung as many times as the deceased was alive, as a tribute to his or her life." The bell also gives us the mood of a time of greif and sadness. The speaker of this sonnet is afraid that their death will affect their lovers life to some extent that he's worried about it before he dies.
He wishes that her love for him will "decay" when he dies so she doesn't feel the pain of missing a loved one

No longer mourn for me when I am dead The speaker is talking to their friend, and or is a loved one. The speaker starts off the sonnet with saying that he hopes his friend does not weep heavily at his death. There's a possibility that the speaker is an older man because he insinuates that his passing will take place before his friends's. Then you shall hear the surly sullen bell From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell: Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it; for love you so That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot If thinking on me then should make you woe. O, if, I say, you look upon this verse

When I perhaps compounded am with clay,

Do not so much as my poor name rehearse. But let your love even with my life decay Lest the wise world should look into your moan And mock you with me after I am gone. The speaker still wants his friend to spread news of his passing... The writer hopes that when he passes and his love reads the sonnet that they do not remember him because of his concern for their dealing with his death. Give warning to the world that I am fled "At funerals during the Renaissance, one could pay to have the "passing-bell" rung as many times as the deceased was alive, as a tribute to his or her life." Shakespeare talks about a "surly sullen bell" in the sonnet. He refers to it in saying that when his dear friend that he's writing this to hears it at his death, that he takes from his death any positive that he can. No longer mourn for me when I am dead
Then you shall hear the surly sullen bell
Give warning to the world that I am fled
From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell:
Nay, if you read this line, remember not
The hand that writ it; for I love you so
That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot
If thinking on me then should make you woe.
O, if, I say, you look upon this verse
When I perhaps compounded am with clay,
Do not so much as my poor name rehearse.
But let your love even with my life decay,
Lest the wise world should look into your moan
And mock you with me after I am gone. Speaker hopes that his friend to not be filled with too much misery and to be able to move on with their life Talking about being buried in the ground Speaker shows insecurity because they are afraid that others will mock his friend for his death when he's gone. SONNET 71 Really goes into depth about how his friend hopefully reacts to his death. Poet more worried about his friends social status after his death then other important things in his life By Brad Pollick
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