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Charles Dickens Use of Foils in Great Expectations

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Ross Murdoch

on 18 October 2012

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Transcript of Charles Dickens Use of Foils in Great Expectations

Criminals Charles Dickens' Use of Foils in
Great Expectations By: Ross, Nick and Quentin Realist Pip Herbert Herbert's Expectations Unlike Pip, Herbert is satisfied with his social status and he hopes to become a insurer in ships

Herbert says" I shall not rest satisfied with merely employing my capital in insuring ships. I shall buy up some good Life Assurance shares, and cut into the Direction. I shall also do a little in the mining way. None of these things will interfere with my chartering a few thousand tons on my own account. I think I shall trade,' said he, leaning back in his chair, `to the East Indies, for silks, shawls, spices, dyes, drugs, and precious woods. It's an interesting trade." (192) Gentlemen Gentlemen Pip's Expectations Throughout the most part of the novel, it is evident that Pip is not pleased with his social class Idealist "The sound of our pens going refreshed us exceedingly, insomuch that I sometimes found it difficult to distinguish between this edifying business proceedings and actually paying the money" (Dickens 306) Estella vs. Biddy vs. Clara Biddy Estella Why Dickens uses Foils in Great Expectations Contrast
Shows off their good and bad traits Shows themes
Gives them a realistic appeal Satire Clara Generous
Approachable
Wise Raised by crazy old women Both options for Pips marriage Cold
Cynical Manipulative
High Class Joe vs. Matthew Pocket Joe Mr. Pocket Mrs. Joe vs. Mrs. Belinda Pocket Magwitch vs. Compeyson "I have been thinking since we have been talking with our feet on this fender, that Estella cannot surely be a condition of your inheritance , if she was never referred to by your guardian." (Dickens 227) Kind and Committed Play a young feminine role in the novel Take care of invalids Don't work in society Darles Chickens Went to the same prison for the same crime -Educated
-Wealthy
-Superficial Gentleman
-Good at smooth talking, and appearing "wealthy"
-Mean, cold, and selfish
-comes from a rich background They both are unsatisfied with their current social class. They are both the head of the household -Kind heart
-Cares for others
-not educated
-appears rough
-Gentleman of the heart
-comes from a poor background Both strive to be of a higher class Mrs. Joe is of a lower social class Mrs. Belinda Pocket is a member of the middle class Lower Class Middle Class Gentlemen of
the heart Educated Uneducated Low Social Class Middle Class Mrs. Joe Mrs. Belinda Pocket Does not have much money She is a very spoiled wife Relies on the two care takers to take care of her children BELIEVES she comes from a richer background Comes from a poor background She takes care of both Pip
and Joe "'Dear Magwitch, I must tell you, now at last. You understand what I say?'
A gentle pressure on my hand.
'You had a child once, whom you loved and lost'
A stronger pressure on my hand.
'She lived and found powerful friends. She is living now, she is a lady and very beautiful. And I love her!'" "'Handel, said Herbert, stopping,"you feel convinced that you can take no further benefits from him, do you?'
'Fully. Surely you would too, if you were in my place?'
'And you feel convinced that you must break with him?'
'Herbert, can you ask me?'
'And you have, and you are bound to have, that tenderness for the life he has risked on your account, that you must save him, if possible, from throwing it away. Then you must get him out of England before you stir a finger to extricate yourself. That done, extricate yourself, in Heaven's name, and we'll see it out together, dear old boy.'" "I set off on the four-mile walk to our forge; pondering, as I went along, on all I had seen, and deeply revolving that I was a common labouring-boy; that my hands were coarse; that my boots were thick; that I had fallen into a despicable habit of calling knaves Jacks; that I was much more ignorant than I had considered myself last night, and generally that I was in a low-lived bad way." (Dickens, 67) This shows a contrast between Pip's and Herbert' s Expectations
-Pip wants to become a member of a higher class
-Whereas Herbert strives to become a insurer of ships Any Questions or Comments? "'Biddy,' I exclaimed, impatiently, 'I am not at all happy as I am. I am disgusted with my calling and with my life. I have never taken to either, since I was bound. Don't be absurd.'" ... “'Well then, understand once for all that I never shall or can be comfortable - or anything but miserable - there, Biddy! - unless I can lead a very different sort of life from the life I lead now." (Dickens,135)
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