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WR5

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by

Rachel Cooke

on 30 March 2014

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Transcript of WR5

"Willingham says, “It is self-defeating to give all of your students the same work. The less capable students will find it too difficult and will struggle against their brain’s bias to mentally walk away from the schoolwork. To the extent that you can, it’s smart; I think to assign work to individuals or groups of students that is appropriate to their current level of competence.” Differentiation.
“…the fact is they are behind the others and giving them work that is beyond them is unlikely to help them catch up, and
I ask you to read that quotation again, because it halts me every time. Our current practices in English classrooms may contribute to our students’ lack of progress in reading. Willingham suggests that we are giving student’s work that is likely to make them
When our curriculum is consistently too difficult for the readers we have, we’ll send them on to our colleagues at the next grade level in a worse place than we received them."
Penny Kittle: Book Love
The Differentiated Book Club
Book Clubs Combine
Reader Response Theory
How do students choose what they want to read?
What are book clubs?
Expressing and exploring each reader's experience of the text
dialogue with the text
dialogue with another reader
dialogue with a community of readers
Literature of Exploration - Louise Rosenblatt
Cooperative Learning
Working together to construct knowledge
positive interdependence
individual accountability
face-to-face interaction
social skills
processing
Authentic Assessment
Assessment that is derived from the kinds of experiences that exist in "real life"
a reflection on the individual and communal experience of the text
Differentiated Instruction
According to student:
interest
readiness
learning profile
Teachers differentiate through:
content
product
process
learning environment
Young adolescents learn best when they work with their peers in cooperative settings where they interact actively with the materials and with each other. Literature circles, paired readings, dialogue journals, creative dramatics, reader's theatre, and other strategies that bring students into situations where they learn not only from the teacher but also from each other are the most effective structures..."
Understanding Middle School Students
Linda Robinson
These practices, which are often a part of response-centered classrooms, facilitate the students' move from their own limited view of the world to a broader view, encourage a sociocentric perspective, allow them to practice new reasoning skills, and give them the opportunity to hear one another's thoughts.
Understanding Middle School Students
Linda Robinson
What do students do during book clubs?
book pass
reading cards
evidence-based paragraphs
annotate text
Book Clubs
combine
the best of...

Annotations
Assessment OF Learning
5 strategies directed by the teacher
- reading strategies on demand
5 strategies that are the students' choice
- authentic application of reading strategies
1 mark for correct identification of the strategy
2 marks for the quality of the strategy
Assessment AS learning
students comment on the strategies they find most helpful to make meaning of
text & how they used the strategies to fix-
up meaning
Assessment FOR Learning
what strategies do students use most
often
what strategies do they shy away from
reading strategies on demand
authentic application of reading strategies
Rachel Cooke
Instructional Leader: English/Literacy TDSB

What are annotations?
Reading Strategies
predicting
activating background knowledge
summarizing
inferring
visualizing
connecting
asking questions
synthesizing
metacognition
the thinking readers do as they read
how readers negotiate text
makes the invisible, visible
Unwind by Neal Shusterman

“There are places you can go,” Ariana tells him, “and a guy as smart as you has a decent chance of surviving to eighteen.”
Connor isn’t so sure, but looking into Ariana’s eyes makes his doubts go away, if only for a moment. Her eyes are sweet violet with streaks of gray. She’s such a slave to fashion – always getting the newest pigment injection the second it’s in style. Connor was never into that. He’s always kept his eyes the colour they came in. Brown. He never even got tattoos, like so many kids get these days when they’re little. The only colour on his skin is the tan it takes during the summer, but now, in November, that tan has long faded. He tries not to think about the fact that he’ll never see the summer again. At least not as Connor Lassiter. He still can’t believe that his life is being stolen from him at sixteen.
Simon & Schuster
2007
ISBN: 978 1 4169 1205 7
Obvious Annotations
tend to be literal, on-the-lines
Thoughtful Annotations
consider the intersection of reading strategies
higher level thinking
tend to include inferences
Unwind by Neal Shusterman

“There are places you can go,” Ariana tells him, “and a guy as smart as you has a decent chance of surviving to eighteen.”
Connor isn’t so sure, but looking into Ariana’s eyes makes his doubts go away, if only for a moment. Her eyes are sweet violet with streaks of gray. She’s such a slave to fashion – always getting the newest pigment injection the second it’s in style. Connor was never into that. He’s always kept his eyes the colour they came in. Brown. He never even got tattoos, like so many kids get these days when they’re little. The only colour on his skin is the tan it takes during the summer, but now, in November, that tan has long faded. He tries not to think about the fact that he’ll never see the summer again. At least not as Connor Lassiter. He still can’t believe that his life is being stolen from him at sixteen.
Who is speaking?
directly-stated question
Why would he only survive until eighteen?
inference question
Ariana shops a lot.
obvious
inference
This novel is set in the future.
thoughtful
inference
I see a guy with brown eyes, no tatoos and a faded tan.
obvious visualization
I think Connor is White because he speaks of his tan fading in the fall.
thoughtful visualization with an inference
Resources for Establishing
Amazing Book Clubs
available free on line
iLit.ca
coming this fall: iSkills
is likely to make them fall still further behind."
"fall still further behind."
Full transcript