Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Element Powerpoint

Neon (NE)
by

Janelle Shipotofsky

on 18 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Element Powerpoint

By: Janelle Shipotofsky Neon (NE)
Atomic #: 10
Mass #: 20.1797 Neon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, and Morris M. Travers, an English chemist in 1898. History Neon falls under the group name of Noble Gas, has a Group Number of 18, and Period Number 2. Background Information Neon's origin is from greek neos which means new. Extra information Neon is most commonly seen lighting signs. Example "Open" In Today's World http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/ne.html Resources It was discovered through the study of liquefied air (Argon). Neon's earlier uses were involved in the headlights of vehicles. The number of Protons, Electrons, and Neutrons are all 10. At 293 K, Neon's density is 0.901 g/cm^3. The boiling point is at -246.1 C. and the melting point is -248.6 C. There are isotopes Ne-20, Ne-21, Ne-22. The Crystal Structure is cubic. This element is colorless, odorless, and nonflammable. http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele010.html http://www.chemicool.com/elements/neon.html http://www.c-f-c.com/specgas_products/neon.htm Neon is also found in glow lamps, plasma studies, fluorescent starter tubes, and gas lasers This element makes up 0.0018% of Earth's atmosphere When kept at room temperature, this element is a gas. The classification for this element is non-metal.
Full transcript