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No Fear Shakespeare

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by

Patrick Wilcox

on 22 January 2016

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Transcript of No Fear Shakespeare

Born: April 23, 1564

Died: April 23, 1616

Wife: Anne Hathaway

Children: Susana, Hamnet, and Judith

The truth is there is a great deal of mystery surrounding Shakespeare's biography!
Brief Biography







Contributions
-37 Plays
-154 Sonnets
-3000 New words
William Shakespeare
Shakespearean Language
Why is Shakespeare so difficult to understand? There are a few language barriers to consider...

-Unusual word order

-Old school pronouns

-Random word contractions

-Unfamiliar vocabulary

-Weird insults
Romeo and Juliet
Can you think of any other movies, plays, TV shows, etc. that mention or draw inspiration from Romeo and Juliet?
Elizabethan Theater
Elizabethan Theatre
Shakespeare's stomping grounds was called the Globe Theatre and was located in a bad part of town.
A look at William Shakespeare
No Fear Shakespeare
Shakespearean Language
Since Shakespeare's plays often had poetic rhyme, he would have to mess with the word order to make the rhyme scheme work. The most common word order in the English language is...
SUBJECT
+
VERB
+
OBJECT
Shakespearean Language
Shakespearean Language
Shakespearean Language
Shakespearean Language
Unusual Word Order
Old School Pronouns
THOU
............means
YOU
and is used when it is the
SUBJECT
of the sentence.
If thou art moved, thou runn'st away!

THEE
.............means
YOU
and is used when it is the
OBJECT
of the sentence.
Peace? I hate the word as I hate Hell, all Montagues, and thee.

THY
...............means YOUR and is used before a
NOUN
that begins with a
CONSONANT
sound (like "a" instead of "an").
I do but keep the peace. Put up thy sword or manage it to part these men with me.
Random Word Contractions
Unfamiliar Vocabulary
Weird Insults
Shakespearean Sentence Combos

OBJECT
+
SUBJECT
+
VERB
-Example:
The

sandwich

I

ate
.

VERB
+
SUBJECT
+
OBJECT
-Example:
Ate

I

the

sandwich
.

VERB
+
OBJECT
+
SUBJECT
-Example:
Ate

the

sandwich
I
.
The
SUBJECT
of a sentence is the noun performing the action. To identify the subject, ask yourself the question
"Who or what is doing the action?"

The
VERB
of the sentence is the action. To identify the verb, as yourself the question
"What is the action?"

The
OBJECT
of a sentence is the noun receiving or being affected by the action. To identify the object of the sentence as yourself
"Who or what is receiving the action?"
-Example:
Mr. Wilcox

loves

English class
.
-Example:
Students

enjoy

snow days
.
-Example:
I

ate
the
sandwich
.
Task: Analyze the provided sentences by underlining the subject, circling the verb, and boxing the object.
REMEMBER!
A
PRONOUN
replaces a noun or noun phrase.

In Shakespeare's time, there were a few more pronouns than we have today. Pronouns were used to show difference between the subject and object of a sentence as well as show how well you knew the person you were speaking to.
Task: Translate the provided sentences by replacing the modern form of YOU with the Shakespearean forms of YOU. Then, translate Shakespeare into modern English.
Her
She
We
It
Them
Him
He
Us
You
Shakespeare's plays frequently featured poetic meter (a certain number of syllables per line). In order to meet a specific meter, Shakespeare would take out a common syllable here and there. This is something we do all the time as well!
Words change meaning over time, so it makes sense that in the 400 years since Shakespeare's plays were first performed some stuff has changed. Fortunately, the changes are minor!
In Shakespeare's day, audiences enjoyed an obscene and silly insult (as do we!) so his plays, even the serious tragedies like
Romeo and Juliet
, are full of them.
Romeo and Juliet
as a spaghetti western?
A spaghetti western is
an overly dramatic, action-packed movie with violent show-downs and close-up shots
.
At first, in the 1960s, they were only produced, directed, and written by Italians, but in recent decades directors such as Quentin Tarantino have made the genre popular again.
-Example:
Bright fireworks

elaborately painted

the summer sky
once the sun went down.
-Non-example:
The students

are
tired every morning.
THINE
...........means
YOUR
and is used before a
NOUN
that begins with a
VOWEL
sound (like "an" instead of "a").
It was the nightingale, and not the lark, that pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.


YE
..................means
YOU ALL
and is used when addressing a
GROUP
of people (like y'all).
Hark, ye! Romeo will be here at midnight.

"THREE BLIND MICE crawled along the floor." turns into "THEY crawled along the floor."
'tis = it is

ope = open

o'er = over

ne'er = never
i' = in

e'er = ever

oft = often

e'en = even
Shakespearean Contractions
Task: Circle the contractions in the provided sentences and translate them back into modern English in the provided blanks.
What is a
CONTRACTION
?
A CONTRACTION is a
shortened version of a word.

You're = you are (not your)

An
apostrophe
(') is often used as a
place

holder
for the missing letter(s).
Which letters are missing most often?
Alas........................Exclamation from sadness
Anon.....................Immediately, very soon
Art..........................Are
Ay...........................Yes or "Oh"
Coz........................Cousin or close relative
Dost/Doth.........Do/Does
Ere.........................Before
Hark......................Listen
Hast/Hath..........Has/Have
Hither....................Here
Nay.........................No
Thither..................There
Wherefore..........Why
Shakespeare's Dictionary
Task: Translate the provided sentences from Shakespearean English to modern English and vice versa.
Why did the audience like insults so much?
Create ten insults using columns A, B, and C on your worksheets.

In 10 minutes we will trade insults with a partner.
Task:
Because women weren't allowed to act, boys played the female roles, which means there was a lot of cross-dressing.
The original Globe Theater burned down in 1613 during a performance of Henry VIII when a canon misfired and literally lit the roof on fire.
Outside of the the Globe there was drinking, fighting, gambling, and bear-baiting.
Groundlings paid a penny to watch and had to stand in the front like a mosh pit.
Going to a Shakespearean play was like attending a rock concert.
Recent examples of Spaghetti Westerns
--The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
--Once upon a Time in the West
--Kill Bill
--Django, Unchained
Four Centuries of
I
They
Me
Full transcript