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Zentangle

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by

jon corea

on 7 March 2016

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Transcript of Zentangle

Zentangle
Doodle
A doodle is an unfocused or unconscious drawing made while a person's attention is otherwise occupied.

Doodles are simple drawings that can have concrete representational meaning or may just be abstract shapes.

Stereotypical examples of doodling are found in school notebooks, often in the margins, drawn by students daydreaming or losing interest during class. Other common examples of doodling are produced during long telephone conversations if a pen and paper are available.

Popular kinds of doodles include cartoon versions of teachers or companions in a school, famous TV or comic characters, invented fictional beings, landscapes, geometric shapes, patterns and textures.
According to a study published in the scientific journal Applied Cognitive Psychology, doodling can aid a person's memory by expending just enough energy to keep one from daydreaming, which demands a lot of the brain's processing power, as well as from not paying attention.

Thus, it acts as a mediator between the spectrum of thinking too much or thinking too little and helps focus on the current situation.

The study was done by Professor Jackie Andrade, of the School of Psychology at the University of Plymouth, who reported that doodlers in her experiment recalled 7.5 pieces of information (out of 16 total) on average, 29% more than the average of 5.8 recalled by the control group made of non-doodlers
The word doodle first appeared in the early 17th century to mean a fool or simpleton.

It may derive from the German Dudeltopf or Dudeldop, meaning simpleton or noodle (literally "nightcap").

The meaning "fool, simpleton" is intended in the song title "Yankee Doodle", originally sung by British colonial troops prior to the American Revolutionary War.

This is also the origin of the early eighteenth century verb to doodle, meaning "to swindle or to make a fool of".

The modern meaning emerged in the 1930s either from this meaning or from the verb "to dawdle", which since the seventeenth century has had the meaning of wasting time or being lazy.
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