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Plate Movement Take 2

Our Ever Changing Earth.
by

Cindy Mullikin

on 30 November 2016

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Transcript of Plate Movement Take 2

My lithosphere is a combination of the
upper
part of the
mantle
along with my
crust
. It is the lithosphere that is broken into tectonic plates that
float and move
on top of the
asthenosphere.
The
asthenosphere
is the lower section of my mantle that is in constant motion. The
asthenosphere
is like plastic or putty.

Greetings Inhabitants!
I am Earth. I have always been a crack up. As you just saw, I am not a solid piece. Instead I am made more like a

jig saw
puzzle than a basketball. I am also made of layers.
I also have a
lithosphere
and a
asthenosphere
. What are those?
How Tectonic Plates Move
My Layers
we will cover the three main plate boundaries
How did you figure my layers out? You are such smart inhabitants! You used
waves
made during earthquakes to learn about my layers. Since you have not figured out yet how to journey to the center of me, you used these
seismic
waves to see my layers
indirectly
.
I also have
three
different types of
plate boundaries
in my lithosphere.
They include
convergent
divergent and
transform
You also learned about me through rocks. Geologist who studied these

rocks
learned about the
composition
of rocks that got pushed up from below. I think you know about some of those rocks, like the ones found in
sills, dikes and batholiths
.
You brilliantly discovered that these waves,
seismic
waves, behave differently when they go through different substances based on density. Waves go
faster
through
solids
than liquids. It is pretty cool actually that you figured that out! Good job Earthlings.
How can waves tell you about what you cannot see?
So just like Shrek......I have layers. There are actually four of them. They vary in
size
,
temperature
, and
density
.
Convergent
Boundaries
When two plates
come together
they are called
convergent
.
As you can see, the hotspot is under the surface. Realize how there is a chain of volcanoes behind the hotspot that probably used the hotspot for it's source of magma in the past.
Some land formations created by converging plates are
mountains,

trenches

and
subduction zones
.
Divergent
Boundaries
Divergent boundaries are found where two plates
spread apart
. Some of the land forms created by diverging plates include
seafloor
spreading
and
oceanic rifts
.
Transform
Boundaries
The Interior of the Earth
Transform boundaries
slide
past each other. This can cause faults and shallow destructive earthquakes. This is what is happening in California at the
San Andreas
fault.
Lastly, there is my
inner core
which is the
hottest
(6000°C - 10,800 °F)
and
brightest
layer. It is
solid
and made of mainly iron and nickel.
When I get really stressed....watch out !
This is a picture of a fault. The epicenter is the point on the surface of the earth directly above the focus of an earthquake. The focus is were the energy is released. Earthquakes occur when plates on either side of the fault move. Most earthquakes are a result of huge pieces of rock that press against each other and cause changes in the earth. Energy builds up between the rocks, then rocks suddenly slip past each other. The point where energy is released is called the focus.Above the focus is the epicenter. The place where the ground breaks in the earths outer layer is called a fault. the fault pictured here is a transform fault becuse the plates slide past one another.
Are you wondering how my plates move? It is pretty simple really.
My plates move due to the
convection current
in my mantle. Massive heat is produced by the
radioactive decay
of my core. The hot mantle rises, cools, and then sinks again. This causes my plates to be pushed and pulled.
Hi
This is a beautiful model of my layers.

Hi
Earthquakes appear on
transform faults
Below the surface is the
focus
. This is where earthquakes begin down underground and where the energy is released. Above the focus is the
epicenter.
This is where the earthquake begins on the surface.
There are 3 possible situations for collision:
1
. continental
to continental
2.
oceanic
to oceanic
3. continental to oceanic.

The

denser
one will always sink or
subduct
.
I really can't help it. My stress leads to earthquakes. These are caused when
tension
is released from my rocks in my crust and upper mantle.

This tension is due to friction between the large plates floating on magma on my surface. Sometimes earthquakes happen when the rocks in my crust
bend and break.

This causes
shock waves
to travel on my surface, resulting in widespread destruction.
I don't like it when this happens, but the build up of pressure has to give somehow.
I hope that you have a better understanding of my layers,
my boundaries and what happens due to their movements. I am an every changing planet. Have a great day.

My outer layer that you walk and live on is called the
crust.
The crust is about 40 km (25 miles) thick! It is solid and made mainly of
igneous
rock. It is the coldest of all layers. It is still very hot.... 200 °C to 400 °C (392 °F to 752 °F)
Then there is my
mantle,
which is the second layer and is my
thickest
layer. It is solid at the top and plasitc or putty like in the bottom. It is very hot here.... 500 to 900 °C (932 to 1,652 °F). The
mantle
is really important. It is the
convection current
in my mantle that keeps things moving.
Next is my outer core. It is made up super-heated iron and nickel
magma
. This liquid is even hotter than the mantle. (4400 °C to 6100 °C) It is
constantly flowing
around the inner core. This is my magnetic side.

I am embarrassed to say that I do have a not so nice side to me.
Full transcript