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The Oregon Trail

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by

Gabriella A.

on 19 December 2013

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Transcript of The Oregon Trail

What Obstacles the settlers had to go through
Starving to death, drowning in quicksand, dying of cholera or leaving there wagon behind in the snow was some of the deadly things they went through. About 35,000 people died on the way, one person every 17.5 miles. T
What the travelers ate on their journey
Hundreds of pounds of food was stored in the supply wagons-flour, grain, bacon, salt, coffee, sugar, dried fruits, pickles. These are some examples of the food they ate on their journey west.
Starting the
Journey
The trails were packed with people and their wagons and animals heading west seeking a better life.
The Travelers Homes for 2,000 miles
The Oregon Trail
Book by: Leonard Everett Fisher
Slideshow by: Gabriella Achiro

One of the graves at Oregon trail.
The Oregon Trail
The trail was 2,000 miles
long.
The Oregon trail crossed the Great Plains, breached the rocky mountains,and reached the pacific northwest. Few could imagine the ordeal of the trail before setting out for the "promised land".
didn't steal their clothing and so that wolves wouldn't eat their remains.
A covered wagon in snow
Broken wheels on the
side of the trail
Salt was to preserve the foods they ate
Grains and flour were helped to make bread
They ate dried fruits because if they took regular fruit it could rot much quicker than dried fruit.
Travelers drank coffee so they would have energy to make the trip
The animals that traveled the long the Oregon trail
Just like regular humans, the oxen and cattle also lead the way to the "promised land". They also traveled 2,000 miles but they did all the heavy lifting of the covered wagon and all the essentials needed to make the trip.
Those who left in the early spring, April had a little trouble feeding their animals in the new grasses along the way. Those who left later in May found no grass left for the animals and then the animals would eventually die leaving the family with no animals to pull their wagon.
Cattle pulling a covered
wagon
Oxen pulling a covered wagon.
Indian Attacks
One of the many challenges travelers had to go through were Indian attacks. The Indian attacks were common because the Indians thought the travelers were going to steal crops or clothing.
The Rocky Mountains
The Rockies were dangerous at points but beautiful at other times. At one point three mountain man, Jedediah Smith, David E. Jackson,and William Sublette left Saint Louis, Missouri, with ten wagons full of supplies for people who were trapped on the eastern slopes of the Rockies. .It took them three months to get there and three months to get back.
The Homes for 2,000 Miles were their covered wagons."There was a space in the middle of the wagon, the bottom was carpeted, two chairs and a mirror make it appear like a home"said one of the travelers. As noted, one wagon train could consist of a thousand men, women, and children as many as three thousand to four thousand sand of cattle.
Inside the Covered wagon.
Supplies in the wagon
Essentials in wagon
Full transcript