Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Copy of How to Write a Strong Paragraph (TIED)

No description
by

Lisa Boveroux

on 3 October 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Copy of How to Write a Strong Paragraph (TIED)

Unified
Developed
How to Write a Strong Paragraph
The Never-Ending Struggle to Master the Art of Writing...
Coherent
Paragraphs:
Are groups of related sentences that focus on one idea or argument
Act as the building-blocks of your essay
Help your reader follow your argument and understand your points
What Makes a Good Paragraph?
thoughts proceed logically from one sentence to the next
all sentences relate to the main idea
contains enough information to convey the idea of the paragraph in a reasonably thorough way
AND
ORGANIZED!
The Anatomy of
a Paragraph

T
opic Sentence
I
ntroduce
Evidence
E
vidence
Methods for Developing Coherence:
Maintaining Unity Within your Paragraph:
Methods for Developing your Topic:
Topic sentences act as a one-line summary of your paragraph. In order to write a strong topic sentence, ask yourself:
What is the main point of my paragraph?
How does this paragraph relate to my overall thesis/argument?
Topic sentences should:
explain what you will discuss (the subject) and what you are going to prove.
be the most general sentence in the paragraph, but not too general; your paragraph should only focus on one main point
Can you spot the parts of this topic sentence?
Miss Strangeworth from "The Possibility of Evil" writes the letters because she wants to protect the town from evil.
The shape of clouds are determined
by various factors.
Make sure your evidence is strong enough to support your topic sentence.
Introduce your evidence to orient your reader.
Paraphrase what is going on in the story about the time of the quotation.
This helps the reader to understand the importance of your quote.
Chronology - give the important description/details of the paragraph in the order they occurred
Spatial order - when writing a descriptive paragraph, consider giving details in the order that you see them
Order of importance - when giving analysis or evidence within a paragraph, list your most important point first
General to specific or vice versa
Problem to solution
Transitions - use connecting, "signpost," words and phrases to carry coherence from one sentence to the next.
compare and contrast
use examples and illustrations
evaluate and examine
analyze
describe
cite data and statistics
give an anecdote
define terms
Since you only have one main idea to discuss in your paragraph, you have plenty of space to develop it. Make sure you thoroughly support and elaborate on your topic sentence before moving on to a new paragraph.
After establishing a good flow between your sentences, you must also check to make sure that the ideas/content within those sentences are unified, meaning that they must all relate to your topic sentence.
A paragraph is not just a collection of random sentences. All your sentences must flow together in an organized and logical fashion; they must be coherent.
check to ensure that your supporting sentences build on, clarify, illustrate or explain your paragraph's main idea, eliminate any sentences that stray from the goal of your topic sentence
resist the urge to introduce new information or points, these should follow in the form of a new paragraph
make sure that your topic sentence is not overly broad, so you can focus on just one, unified point in your paragraph
* note: much of you strategy for how you will develop your paragraph depends on what type of paper you are writing. Ask yourself: Am I writing a descriptive, illustrative, analytical, scientific, argumentative, creative, or personal essay before you begin writing to determine how to go about building your paragraphs?
Sources Used:
Hacker, Diana. The Bedford Handbook, Seventh Edition.
Nordquist, Richard. "Develop Effective Paragraphs," About.com. http://grammar.about.com/od/developingessays/u/paressay07.htm#s1
Walters, F. Scott. "Basic Paragraph Structure," TOEFL-Prep Practice Writing Site. http://lrs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/fwalters/para.html
In conclusion, a strong paragraph contains:
a focused, clear topic sentence
enough relevant supporting sentences to thoroughly prove, discuss or illustrate the claim in the topic sentence
a concluding sentence that restates the main point and signals the closing of that specific idea
D
iscuss
THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART!!
Remember the topic sentence: Miss Strangeworth from "The Possibility of Evil" writes the letters because she wants to protect the town from evil.
Which quote would provide good evidence?
For example, "Her hand shook slightly...Miss Strangeworth wondered...if she had been taking care of herself" (175).

For example, "Miss Strangeworth looked at him curiously and then said, 'It's Tuesday, Mr. Lewis. You forgot to remind me'" (175).
Make sure you do not move on before you explain how your quote proves your point!!!
This is the first time YOU really appear in your paper. Make sure you shine!
Remember the topic sentence:

Miss Strangeworth from "The Possibility of Evil" writes the letters because she wants to protect the town from evil.

and our evidence:

For example, "Her hand shook slightly...Miss Strangeworth wondered...if she had been taking care of herself" (175).
How can we connect the two?
Full transcript