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The Ancient Greek Olympics

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A.j. Johnson

on 26 October 2013

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Transcript of The Ancient Greek Olympics

The Ancient Greeks:
Their Games, Their Architecture, and Their Gods,

Playing Games: The Olympics Then and Now

Specific Lesson Objectives
Activity 1 Rationale
Standing the Test of Time: Ancient Greek Architecture

What Ancient Greeks Believed: Gods and Goddesses
Activity 2 Rationale
Activity 3 Rationale
References
Lesson 1:
Given the topic of the Olympics, students will compare and contrast the ancient Greek Olympics and the modern-day games and will create an accurate Venn diagram depicting the similarities and differences between the two.
Lesson 2:
Given the topic of important architectural contributions made by the ancient Greeks, individual third grade students will create a temple that includes tall columns, carvings on the pediment (above the entry), lots of stairs, and white color as measured by a checklist.
Lesson 3:
Given the topic of life in ancient Greece, groups of third grade students will research ancient Greek the gods and goddesses Zeus, Athena, Poseidon, Hermes, Apollo, and Hades. They will construct a diagram of their family tree and describe their individual roles in ancient Greek life which details this information as measured by a rubric completed by both the student groups and the teacher.
http://greece.mrdonn.org/greekgods/index.html
With your group, find information on the Greek gods and goddesses Zeus, Athena, Poseidon, Hermes, Apollo, and Hades. You can use the links at the bottom of this slide, another website, or any of the books and newspapers we have used in the classroom. You should have at least 5 facts about each.

On a sheet of construction paper, your group should make a family tree (genealogy) that shows how the six gods and goddesses you have studied are related. Use the family tree template we have made in class to help you. Include an illustration of the god or goddess and some of the symbols they are associated with.

Then, write down three or four important facts about all six gods and goddesses. Combine their family genealogy and what you have learned about each in a one-page paper. After your group is finished writing, use your paper to create a short video, Voki, Glog, or slide show, so make sure you have enough information to tell how the gods and goddesses were related and what they were like. You will give your debut your project in class on Unit 3 Celebration Day! See Miss Johnson for instructions regarding how to create the project your group chooses to create.

You will be graded by rubric on: creativity in your presentation, research, project completeness, illustrations, and communication. *See the Social Studies project rubric in your binder or in the classroom for more specific grading information*
Watch the video about the 3 most important parts of ancient Greek architecture that we also see in the modern United States. Then, take the Build A Temple Challenge by clicking the blue link at the bottom of this box. Build your temple, then click file and print. After printing your temple, label the 3 important parts of it. Write your name on your paper and be ready to turn it in!
This project is a mini-check and is not for a grade. However, you will lose 5 homework points if you do not complete the assignment.
http://www.history.com/videos/greek-gods
Watch the video and explore the
pink
links found on this slide. Then, use the
blue
link to make a Venn diagram that compares and contrasts the ancient and the modern Olympics. Compare the locations, athletes that can compete, the sports, what winners received, and who can watch when you make your Venn Diagram. For full credit, you should give it a title and include 3 or more ways they are the same and 6 or more ways they are different. Please print your Venn diagram and bring it to class. You can also save it if you would like or if you need to print it in the
classroom. Make sure the project progress checklist is in your
binder. Use it to make sure you have everything you need.


Greek Gods. (2013). The History Channel website. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-greece/
videos#greek-gods

Ancient Greek Gods for Kids. (2011). Retrieved from http://greece.mrdonn.org/greekgods/index.html
Churches, A. (2008, April 1). Bloom's taxonomy blooms digitally. Retrieved from Tech & Learning website: http://
www.techlearning.com/studies-in-ed-tech/0020/blooms-taxonomy-blooms-digitally/44988
International Association for K12 Online Learning (iNACOL). (2011). National Standards for Quality Online Courses (2).
Retrieved from http://cup.blackboard.com/bbcswebdav/ courses /20141010428/resources/week1/iNACOL
%20Standards%20of%20Quality%20 for%20Online%20Courses.pdf
The activity falls under the level of
Analyzing
on Bloom's digital taxonomy map (Churches, 2008).
Course content is aligned with state's content standards (iNACOL, 2011, Rubric A #2) (Georgia Department of Education, 2008).
Assignment is of sufficient rigor, depth, and breadth to teach the standard (2011, Section A, #3).
Assignment incorporates varied ways to learn and master curriculum (2011, Section B, #1).
Assignment instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning (2011, Section B, #3).
Course provides opportunities for higher-order thinking and critical reasoning (2011, Section B, #4).
Readability levels are appropriate for grade-level expectation (2011, Section B, #7).
Students have access to enrichment resources (2011, Section B, #11).
Project requirements for grading (for full credit) are clearly stated.
Students will read, watch videos, and create a graphic organizer within the activity.
Students can work in the online module from home, school, or other places with Internet service.
Students will have a checklist with which to self-monitor progress.
Assessment tools make the student continuously aware of his/her progress (2011, Section C, #4).
Grading policy is easy to understand (2011, Section C, #7).
The activity falls under the levels of
Understanding
and
Creating
on Bloom's digital taxonomy map (Churches, 2008).
Course content is aligned with state's content standards (iNACOL, 2011, Rubric A #2) (Georgia Department of Education, 2008).
Students will watch an engaging, short "flash cards" video as an enrichment resource
(2011, Section B, #11).
Assignment incorporates two different ways to learn and master curriculum (2011, Section B, #1).
Assignment instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning (2011, Section B, #3).
Course provides opportunities for higher-order thinking and critical reasoning (2011, Section B, #4).
Readability levels are appropriate for grade-level expectation (2011, Section B, #7).
Project requirements for grading (no grade given, homework grade related) are clearly stated.
Students will watch a video and create an ancient Greek temple within the activity.
Students can work in the online module from home, school, or other places with Internet service.
Students can self-monitor progress by viewing and labeling their temples.
Grading policy is easy to understand (2011, Section C, #7).
The activity falls under the levels of
Understanding
,
Analyzing
, and
Creating
on Bloom's digital taxonomy map (Churches, 2008).
Course content is aligned with state's content standards (iNACOL, 2011, Rubric A #2) (Georgia Department of Education, 2008).
Assignment is of sufficient rigor, depth, and breadth to teach the standard (2011, Section A, #3).
Assignment incorporates varied ways to learn and master curriculum (2011, Section B, #1).
Assignment is organized into logical sequence that fosters higher-order thinking (2011, Section B, #2).
Assignment instruction includes activities that engage students in active learning (2011, Section B, #3).
Course provides opportunities for higher-order thinking and critical reasoning (2011, Section B, #4).
Readability levels are appropriate for grade-level expectation (2011, Section B, #7).
Students have access to enrichment resources (2011, Section B, #11).
Project requirements for grading (via rubric students should already have and be familiar with) are clearly stated.
Students will read, watch videos,create a graphic organizer, write, illustrate, and create a digital project within the same activity (2011, Section B, #5).
Students will work in groups as active learners.
Students will work in leveled groups to partner stronger students with those that may need more support.
Instructor-student and student-student interaction is mandatory (2011, Section B, #8).
http://www.softschools.com/math/venn_diagram/venn_diagram_maker/
http://www.olympic.org/ancient-olympic-games?tab=history
http://www.olympic.org/sports
http://www.history.com/topics/olympic-games
http://www.ancientgreece.co.uk/acropolis/challenge/cha_set.html
Acropolis: Challenge (n.d.) The British museum website. Retrieved from http://www.ancientgreece.co.uk/
acropolis/challenge/cha_set
Sports. (n.d.). International Olympic committee website. Retrieved from http://www.olympic.org/sports
Ancient Olympic Games. (n.d.). International Olympic committee website. Retrived from http://
www.olympic.org/ancient-olympic-games?tab=history
Venn Diagram Maker. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.softschools.com/math/venn_diagram/
venn_diagram_maker/
The Olympic Games. (2013). The History Channel website. Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/
olympic-games
Overall Objectives
Students will learn about the influence of ancient Greece on the development of the United States government
(Georgia Department of Education, 2008, standard SS3H1a-c).

Georgia Department of Education. (2008). Social studies grade three standards. Retrieved from https://
www.georgiastandards.org/Standards/Georgia%20Performance%20Standards/Gr3%20Social%20Studies
%20Stds%202009-2010%205-27-08.pdf
In this activity, students will learn about the ancient and modern Olympics and will compare and contrast the two using a Venn Diagram graphic organizer.
In this activity, students will explain the 3 main characteristics of Greek architecture seen in the
modern USA and will then create and label an ancient Greek temple using those characteristics.
In this activity, students will work within a group in order to research six gods and goddesses using a multitude of resources both online and in the traditional classroom. Groups will use their information to create a god and goddess family tree graphic organizer, write a short informational text highlighting their findings, produce a final project, and present it to the class.
Full transcript