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The CRAAP Test

Learn how to evaluate information using this easy, memorable acronym.
by

Adriana Parker

on 7 October 2013

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Transcript of The CRAAP Test

Real
Huge

It's a huge mountain . . .
of information.
Think of it as a pile of CRAAP.
You have just been assigned a
RESEARCH PROJECT.
1st step:
Pick a topic
Ta da!
the end!
2nd step:
Find info
Spark
Last step:
Present
what are you gonna do?
(cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr
NOT SO FAST . . .
What about that second step?
Where are you gonna go to find information?
GOOGLE!
Amirite?

And off we go . . .
The thing about Google is
(That's an acronym, so it's not crass.)
Do this simple test whenever you're faced with new information
in order to determine if that information is "good."
Currency
Has it been
revised?
Does your topic required current info?
When was the information
published or posted?
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
Would older sources work?
Relevance
Does the info answer your research question?
Is the info too simple or too advanced?
Who's the intended audience?
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
Have you looked at a variety of other sources?
Authority
Who is the author?
Is the author an expert ?
Is there contact information?
What does the URL
extension tell you?
(You know what I just realized, you guys?
These are CRAAP trees. Ew.)

Anyhow . . .
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
Accuracy
Where's the info from?
Is it supported
by evidence?
Is it peer-reviewed?
Can you find other
sources to validate it?
"Cosmetic" errors?
Purpose
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
What' the purpose?
Is the purpose
clearly stated?
Is it fact-based?
Would you say
it's impartial?
Biases?
Answer those questions,
Yes, all of them.
And you can consider that information
"good," or "valid," or "legitimate."

Well done, Smartypants.
Full transcript