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Engaging Students in History

A resource for ideas of how to teach social studies.
by

Shane Kelbaugh

on 28 May 2012

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Transcript of Engaging Students in History

Eng
Engaging Students in Learning History
This is not your daddy's history class...
Bueller...
Bueller...
Bueller...
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Why don't students listen!?
HISTORY IS BORING!!!
We've heard this before from friends and students.
But this is not the problem.
The is that traditional media don't interest children. and discourage imagination.
problem
Lectures
textbooks
"Our first priority in teaching history is to develop strategies that and our students' ." John Fiedling
arouse
engage
historical imaginations
20%
30%
50%
90%
of what they
of what they
of what they
of what they
of what they
read
hear
see
see
hear
and
do
and
SINCE LEARNERS REMEMBER:
10%
say
"The challenge is then to make the study of history something that students can
see, do,
and
talk about
."
John Fielding
Strategies for Increasing Student Interest
Interesting, but
Ineffective
Crossword Puzzles
t
h
i
s
c
t
h
s
e
a
e
n
o
t
h
i
n
g
Word Searches
Trivia Games
Students don't learn about hisorical context,and these activities don't involve any of the benchmarks of historical thinking.
Though useful to conclude lessons and review material, trivia games often serve only to remind students of their poor memorization skills!
Answer: This person is a totally inept and stupid student.

Question: Who is me?
REMEMBER:
Peter Seixas's 6 Historical Thinking Concepts
1
2
3
4
5
6
Historical Significance
looks at why an event, person, or development from the past is important. What would happen if it hadn't existed?
Evidence
looks at primary and secondary sources to discern details of the past.
Continuity and Change
considers what has changed in time and what has remained the same. Includes chronology and periodization as a means of organizing trends over time.
Cause and Consequence
explores the concept of "agency" - the force(s) of individuals or groups that cause things to happen the way they did. Examines why these things unfolded and asks if there is more than one reason.
Historical Perspective
looks at a person's mindset at the time of a past event. E.g. what is it like to be an indigenous population at the time of your land's "discovery" by foreign explorers?
Ethical Dimension
this is about suspending moral judgment while studying history. The purpose of study is not to assign blame, but rather to critically examine past events.
Seixas, 2006
Keeping these historical thinking concepts in mind (and making sure your students are doing the same) should be central to your lesson design. These concepts will make your students learners.
active
Traditional, Interesting, and
Potentially
Effective
Films, Videos and DVD's
Ineffective if viewed passively, but useful for providing visual context.
Field Trips
"Challenge students to think about what they are experiencing, why a site is important, and what we can learn from it."
Debates
Fiedling Prefers a less "either/or" approach to debating.
Students are more concerned with winning their arguments than examining the issues.
Debono's PMI Approach
P
lus
M
inus
nteresting
I
U-Shape forum for classroom discussion
Posters
Make sure your activities stick to the Historical Thinking Concepts!
Analyze the components of propaganda posters
Research the cultural and political notions behind these images
Design another poster (maybe not a Nazi one)
Mind Maps
Useful as an alternative to written demonstrations of knowledge
Timelines
Agricultural Revolution
Invention of the Wheel
Proliferation of Latin
Inception of Judaism
Collapse of Western Rome
Genghis Khan's Conquest
Invention of the Printing Press
Religious Schism in Europe
The Renaissance
The Enlightenment
The French Revolution
Assassination of Archduke
Ferdinand
The Comunist Revolution
Nazi and Japanese
World Conquest
The Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
Rank these 15 items in order of their historical significance.
Less Traditional,
Imaginative, Engaging,
and
Effective
Strategies
Postcard from the Past
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/education/sources/008001-4010.2-e.html
Obituarties/Eulogy
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
19.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Students write a summary and inerpretation of a person's life and accomplishments
A good exercise in research (evidence evaluation).
Requires assessment of historical significance to determine noteworthy anecdotes.
Role Playing
Tableau
Depict a Scene
from History
Pros
open-ended role play allows students to analyze a problem or controversy
put on the shoes of another person - develop a social conscience
gives students a chance to control their own learning
students are encouraged to feel as well as think
Cons
difficult to develop historical context - students often maintain a modern mindset of values and culture
complexities and subtleties are overlooked as students resort to stereotypes
Keep it
Relative
Relative
Keep it
Debrief each role-play with questions
1.Who was portrayed?
2.Why was it important?
3.Was it a plausible recreation of the event?
4.What aspects do we need to learn more about?
5.Are there other interpretations of what happened?
6.What have we learned from this activity?
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