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Fate and Free Will - Elizabethan England

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Kenny Cheung

on 4 February 2014

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Transcript of Fate and Free Will - Elizabethan England

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/55/Romeo_and_juliet_brown.jp
Fate
and
Free Will
in Elizabethan England

Aidan Maese-Czeropski
&
Kenneth Cheung
Fate
Fate is the idea that people's lives are destined to end up at certain place in a certain way according to the stars and how they were aligned at birth.
Strong belief in astrology

Horoscopes played a role in
many traditions.


What is Free Will?
The idea that life is controlled not by fate or God but by the decisions of the individual
First explored by Aristotle
Free Will can lead to rebellion
Free Will and Moral Responsibility
No one questioned these beliefs because:
You would go against your parents.
You would go against your priest.
You would go to hell.
People are morally responsible for actions done on their own free will
Shakespeare and Free Will
Shakespeare believed in God
But also that actions could alter fate
Most people at the time:
Free Will in Shakespeare's Works
Romeo and Juliet
Fate
Free Will
Julius Caesar
Against Free Will God Angel. http://www.berfrois.com. JPG Image. 31 January 2014


Aristotle Altemps. http://www.wondersandmarvels.com. JPG Image 31 January 2014



Watterson, Bill. Calvin-Free-Will. http://paraschopra.com. JPG Image 31 January 2014
= Fate + Free Will
"A pair of star-cross'd lovers will take their life
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife"
"Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night’s revels, and expire the term
Of a despised life closed in my breast
By some vile forfeit of untimely death
But he that hath the steerage of my course
Direct my sail. On, lusty gentlemen"
N.d. Photograph. My Byzantine. 2013. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.
N.d. Photograph. Karen Whimsey. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.
N.d. Photograph. Astrology. Wikipedia. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.

N.d. Photograph. The Shakespeare Blog. Wordpress. Web. 1 Feb. 2014
N.d. Photograph. Galactic Connection. BBS Radio. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.
N.d. Photograph. A Catholic Life. Blogspot. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.
N.d. Photograph. Shades of Kairos. Blogspot. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.
N.d. Photograph. The Works of William Shakespeare. Wikipedia, 1884. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.
N.d. Photograph. Adagietto. Blogspot. Web. 1 Feb. 2014.
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, / But in ourselves, that we are underlings” (I.ii.140–142)
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Julius Caesar Photos." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 02 Feb. 2014.
"Do We Really Have Free Will?" PSY Blog. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.
Barker, Debs. "Shakespeare the Social Psychologist." Thinking Utopia. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.
By Kenneth Cheung
Free
Will
"Romeo and Juliet." Romeo and Juliet Page -- Mrdclassroom.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.
"Fresh Meaty Words: The Final Works." Fresh Meaty Words The Final Works. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.
"Richland Library." Richland Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.
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