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Subjects and Predicates

6th grade teaching tool
by

Becky Mills

on 17 October 2013

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Transcript of Subjects and Predicates

Subjects and Predicates
Sentences
All sentences

have two parts.
subject
predicate.

Subjects-
Simple &
Complete
Predicates-
Simple &
Complete
Subjects
The Who or What of Sentences.
A.K.A. Nouns & Pronouns
Things are nouns.
A pronoun for two cows is "they."
A pronoun for a girl is "she."
People are Nouns
Places are Nouns
A pronoun for Bald Head Island is "it."
"They" are students.
Abstract ideas are nouns.
Contemplation is an abstract noun.
"It" is its pronoun.
Simple Subjects
Just the simple who or what of the sentence.
Only nouns and pronouns
NO OBJECTS
of prepositions nor objects of verbs. (You'll learn more about this later.)
Assumed "you" in commands
Complete Subjects
Complete Subject Examples
The baby bunny
was hiding in the tall grass.
In the beginning,
we
were so excited!
The Girl with a Pearl Earring
is a famous painting.
Please sit down. (assumed
you
)
Simple Subject Examples
The baby
bunny
was hiding in the tall grass.
In the beginning,
we
were so excited!
The Girl with a Pearl Earring
is a painting.
Please sit down. (assumed
you
)
The
simple subject
plus all of the words that describe it.
A prepositional phrase
CAN
be a part of the
complete subject.
Compound Subjects
Two or more
simple subjects
with a conjunction (F.A.N.B.O.Y.S.)

Salty
peanuts
and chewy
raisins
make great snacks.
After school, my
friends
and
brothers
will meet near the field.
Swimming, running,
and
tennis
are great cardiovascular activities.
Predicates are verbs and verb phrases.
They tell the
action
of the subject or the subject's
state of being
.

Predicates
Malcolm
is
confused.
(state of being)
Minnie Mouse
sits
on top of Kitty's head.
(action)
Simple Predicates

Just the simple action or state of being of the subject.
Only verbs or verb phrases
All helping verbs
MUST
be included in the simple verb phrase.
Verbs are
NEVER
found in prepositional phrases

Helping Verbs
Learn them to the tune of "Jingle Bells"!
"To Be" Verbs
are
either helping
if with another verb,
or linking
if alone or the main verb.
is
are
was
were
am
been
be
being
be
am
is
are
was
were
been
being
has
have
had
do
did
does
can
could
shall
will
would
should
may
might
must
YOU MUST MEMORIZE THE HELPING VERBS!
You MUST MEMORIZE
THE "TO BE" VERBS!
Simple Predicate Examples
Edith

fell
during her vacation last year.
After the concert,
Harold

lost
his voice from screaming so much.
It

would have been
better for him to clap.
How
could

he

hear
the music?
Running from the crowd,
he
also
stumbled
.
Beware of Adverbs!
Adverbs hang out with verbs and separate phrases.
Adverbs are like prepositions without phrases.
They tell Where? When? How? or How much? (BTW- these words are adverbs.)
Remember, not is not a verb. Never is never a verb. Always is always an adverb.
Many adverbs end in -ly.
I
will
not often
check
my voice mail.
adverbs
Compound Verbs
We
will

swim
in the pool and
dry
off on a towel.
Would
you like to
eat
now or
take
a nap?
Two or more simple predicates (verb phrases) with a conjunction.
Complete Predicates
Edith
fell during her vacation last year.
After the concert,
Harold
lost his voice from screaming so much.
It
would have been better for him to clap.
How could
he
hear the music
?
Running from the crowd,
he
also stumbled
.
Includes all the words in the predicate.
This means every word except the complete subject.
Include adverbs and prepositional phrases
Strategies That Work
However, sometimes

it
's not easy to find the subject and predicate.
Just Verbs!
To Find the Complete
Subject
Ask Who? or What? did the action.
When an interrogative sentence begins with "who" or "what," those words ARE the complete and simple subject.
To find the simple subject or predicate
Bracket off prepositional phrases.
[In the nest] a little
bird
slept.
Its nest
was padded
[with string.]
Introductory Elements
Rearrange sentences with
INTRODUCTORY ELEMENTS
by putting them at the end of the sentence. This puts the subject first.

Riding down the street on his bike
,
the boy
felt complete freedom
.
The boy
felt complete freedom riding down the street on his bike
.
Interrogative Sentences
Turn interrogative sentences into statements, but be careful of adverbs that need to be left out.

When will
the afternoon train

arrive
?
The afternoon train

will arrive. (when)
Exclamatory Sentences

Rearrange the words in exclamatory sentences.
How kind
you
are!
You
are kind! (how)
Full transcript