Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Copy of How to Pre-Write a Passing AP Essay

Five Easy Steps to the AP English Literature and Composition Essay
by

Shannon Murphree

on 10 September 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Copy of How to Pre-Write a Passing AP Essay

To writing your essay!
Five Easy Steps!
Read the prompt (20 Seconds)
Read the prompt again (20 seconds)
Read the passage (2-3 Minutes)
Analyze the Prompt (1-2 minutes)
Read the passage again, make observations, mark examples, find relevant quotes (4 minutes)









The following selection is the opening of Ann Petry’s 1946 novel, The Street. Read the selection carefully and then write an essay analyzing how Petry establishes Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting through the use of such literary devices as imagery, personification, selection of detail, and figurative language.
1. Read the Prompt
2. Read the Prompt Again
The following selection is the opening of Ann Petry’s 1946 novel, The Street. Read the selection carefully and then write an essay analyzing how Petry establishes Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting through the use of such literary devices as imagery, personification, selection of detail, and figurative language.
3. Read the Passage
There was a cold November wind blowing through 116th Street. It rattled the tops of garbage cans, sucked window shades out through the top of opened windows and set them flapping back against the 5 windows; and it drove most of the people off the street in the block between Seventh and Eighth Avenues except for a few hurried pedestrians who bent double in an effort to offer the least possible exposed surface to its violent assault. 10 It found every scrap of paper along the street—theater throwaways, announcements of dances and lodge meetings, the heavy waxed paper that loaves of bread had been wrapped in, the thinner waxed paper that had enclosed sandwiches, old envelopes, 15 newspapers. Fingering its way along the curb, the wind set the bits of paper to dancing high in the air, so that a barrage of paper swirled into the faces of the people on the street. It even took time to rush into doorways and areaways and find chicken bones and 20 pork-chop bones and pushed them along the curb. It did everything it could to discourage the people walking along the street. It found all the dirt and dust and grime on the sidewalk and lifted it up so that the dirt got into their noses, making it difficult to breathe; 25 the dust got into their eyes and blinded them; and the grit stung their skins. It wrapped newspaper around their feet entangling them until the people cursed deep in their throats, stamped their feet, kicked at the paper. The wind blew it back again and again until 30 they were forced to stoop and dislodge the paper with their hands. And then the wind grabbed their hats, pried their scarves from around their necks, stuck its fingers inside their coat collars, blew their coats away from their bodies.

35 The wind lifted Lutie Johnson’s hair away from the back of her neck so that she felt suddenly naked and bald, for her hair had been resting softly and warmly against her skin. She shivered as the cold fingers of the wind touched the back of her neck, explored the 40 sides of her head. It even blew her eyelashes away from her eyes so that her eyeballs were bathed in a rush of coldness and she had to blink in order to read the words on the sign swaying back and forth over her head. 45 Each time she thought she had the sign in focus, the wind pushed it away from her so that she wasn’t certain whether it said three rooms or two rooms. If it was three, why, she would go in and ask to see it, but if it said two—why, there wasn’t any point. Even 50 with the wind twisting the sign away from her, she could see that it had been there for a long time because its original coat of white paint was streaked with rust where years of rain and snow had finally eaten the paint off down to the metal and the metal 55 had slowly rusted, making a dark red stain like blood. It was three rooms. The wind held it still for an instant in front of her and then swooped it away until it was standing at an impossible angle on the rod that suspended it from the building. She read it rapidly. 60 Three rooms, steam heat, parquet floors, respectable tenants. Reasonable
There is a Paradigm, Archetype, a MOTHER of all AP Prose and Poetry




Read the following (prose passage or poem) carefully. Then write an essay in which you discuss the author’s (or the speaker’s, or x’s, or x’s and y’s) attitude(s) toward a (or a and b) and the devices the author uses to convey these view(s).



Quoted from Cliff’s Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Preparation Guide by Allan Casson
The Question Has 2 Parts:
The first calls for a reading of meaning, an interpretation of what the passage conveys. The question may ask for the attitude, or views, or response, or feelings of the author, or the speaker, or a character, or two characters who appear in the poem or the passage.

Quoted from Cliff’s Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Preparation Guide by Allan Casson
The Second Part Is:



It calls for a discussion of devices, or literary devices, or techniques, or language or stylistic devices, or style. Half of the time the devices will be unspecified. Half of the time the question will contain a list of two or more. The most commonly specified techniques are diction, imagery, figurative language, choice of details, tone, and syntax. Less often, the list may include the following: organization, devices of sound, allusion, and point of view.
Analyze the Prompt



The following selection is the opening of Ann Petry’s 1946 novel, The Street. Read the selection carefully and then write an essay analyzing how Petry establishes Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting through the use of such literary devices as imagery, personification, selection of detail, and figurative language.
Look for Information in the Prompt


The following selection is the
opening
of
Ann Petry’s 1946 novel, The Street
. Read the selection carefully and then write an essay analyzing how Petry establishes
Lutie Johnson’s
relationship to the urban setting through the use of such literary devices as imagery, personification, selection of detail, and figurative language.
Look for Information in the Prompt


The following selection is the opening of Ann Petry’s 1946 novel, The Street. Read the selection carefully and then write an essay analyzing how Petry establishes Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting through the use of such literary devices asimagery, personification, selection of detail, and figurative language.
Look for
Directions
in the Prompt

The following selection is the opening of Ann Petry’s 1946 novel, The Street.
Read the selection carefully and then write an essay analyzing how Petry establishes Lutie Johnson’s relationship to the urban setting
through the use of such literary devices as imagery, personification, selection of detail, and figurative language.
Clarify the Directions and Look for the KEY






Lutie Johnson’s r
elationship t
o the urban settingYou must know what
the relationship is.
Read the PASSAGE AGAIN!
...Mark Examples and Find Quotes
For Example:

First half is only about the wind.November and colddirt, garbage, litter.Wind is personified as mischievous, maybe even malicious
Lutie feels assaulted, bald,and naked. She fights the wind to read sign.Rust looks like bloodDoes the wind treat Lutie the same as, worse than or better than the other people on the street?
Start Writing!
Full transcript