Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Writing to Persuade

No description
by

Ashley McElveen

on 20 June 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Writing to Persuade

Writing to Persuade
Influence someone's thoughts
or actions
to believe
Convince
Urge, entice, impel
Induce, move,
motivate, sway
To persuade your readers is to convince them to
think, act, or feel a certain way. Specifically, the
process of persuasion involves appealing to one or
more of the following: reason/rational thinking,
emotion, or sense of ethics/morals. Evidence used
might include facts, opinions of recognized experts on
the subject, and examples illustrating the evidence.
Asserting a position and backing it with reasons and
support are essential to a successful persuasive essay.
Step 1: Consider your
audience and the format
your writing should
take. Formats may include
a letter, newspaper article,
or essay.

Step 2: Consider the pros
and cons of both positions.
Record this information
on a tree map.

WEARING UNIFORMS
pros cons

people will not be
judged by clothes
less costly to parents
creates school unity
no individuality
takes away freedom
of choice
Step 3: Decide on your
position. Select the three
most convincing reasons
to support your position.

Step 4: Write your opening paragraph. Whenever possible you should use an attention- getting
technique to introduce your position. This can be done by a startling fact, a quote from a famous person, a research fact, or a humorous or interesting anecdote. After the opening, you should write a thesis statement that clearly states your position.
SAMPLE OPENING PARAGRAPH:

Have you ever been to a
public function where you felt
out of place because of what you
were wearing? Maybe you did not
have on the latest fashion because
your budget would not allow you to
spend that kind of money on clothes.
Every day there are students in our
schools who feel self-conscious because of their clothes. Such would not be the case if students in our school district wore uniforms to school. Please consider the following before making your final decision regarding this issue.
Step 5: Select your
three best reasons to
support your position.
Create a Flow Map
listing your reasons
(least important to the most
important). Select your
transition words and write
your supporting details under
each reason.
In the first place Another reason Finally
Allows time for more
worthwhile activities
Less costly to
parents
People will not be
judged by their
clothes
Will not hang out
at malls getting in
trouble
Parents would have
money for other
things
People tend to
label others who
cannot
dress like everyone
else
Step 6: Write a closing paragraph that brings
closure to the argument. It should restate the
position, summarize the argument, and
attempt to answer these questions: So what?
Why is the position important?
You might use an example or refute the
opposite position in the closing paragraph.
CLOSING PARAGRAPH:
There is absolutely no doubt that
requiring students to wear uniforms to
school would solve a lot of problems for
both students and parents. Mothers and
fathers will feel less pressure finacially,
students will not be judged by the clothes they wear, and without the focus on shopping for the latest fashions, students should be encouraged to spend time in more worthwhile activities. While we acknowledge that the adolescent years are a time for self expression and developing a personal identity, I urge you to allow our students to be appreciated and recognized by what is within rather than what is on the outside.
Now it is your turn....
Write a persuasive essay
stating whether certain
television programs that
are considered to be
unsuitable should be
censored for children
under sixteen.

Make sure to follow the
steps of persuasive
writing in order to
produce a fabulous
essay!
Full transcript