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FAC Modeling

Winter Break 2011-12 Modeling of a revised curriculum
by

Ken Parsons

on 15 August 2012

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Transcript of FAC Modeling

Expression & Society Designs of Nature Social Justice & Civic Life 1st Dimension - Breadth of Knowledge Perspectives 2nd Dimension - Increasing Rigor in Writing, Communication and Critical Thinking Skills/Proficiencies Coherence & Integration Layer 2 details
Summative assessment?
"Comprehensive Exam"
Student-teacher-mentor-learner WS/PL 226. Feminist Theory. (3)
This course provides an introduction to feminist theoretical methods through an examination of some of the basic categories of feminist analysis, including identities, bodies, rights, politics, sexuality, and reproduction, among others. We will consider what role these categories and their construction play in creating gendered experiences within culture. CORE-II Co-curricular cluster activities
On-campus film seminars lead by teaching faculty
Panel discussions around contemporary topics relevant to cluster theme (e.g. nationalism, gender, cultural identity)
Speaker series
Student presentations Cross-curricular Clustering
Faculty choose a level of integration (class period(s), sections/units, readings, outcomes)
Students are assigned like work in one or more areas
Common experience(s) (like co-curricular cluster activities) Inter-curricular Clustering
Megalevel integrative moments between thematically similar courses
Generative knowledge and interaction around broad questions
Problem-solving, creative thinking, or analytic writing as part of the collective purpose/goal 1st level 2nd level 3rd level 4th level FY Inquiry Seminar (3)
Writ 100-level
GS 100-level
TechLit 100-level
Broad exposure to multiple faculty (IS intentionality)
Interactive moments between courses and faculty in general, common contexts emphasizing breadth

Current 100-199 Level II courses (6-9)
Interdisc or multidisc course
Comm-Intensive
Some 200-level retooled to suit 100-level and vice versa MITL "CI" Interdisc Thematic Commons (e.g. Ignition-ish) Course Interrelations (e.g. Clustering-ish) Advanced Team-Taught Seminars (e.g. Level III IS-ish) Common Learning & Personal Development Independent Directed Study (e.g. Advocacy/Solution-ish) FYS (GS/WI) FYS (GS/WI) FYS (GS/WI)
Math HI (4 courses)
PL/RS
"Soc Institutions"
"Self & Society" Level II Science (4hrs)
PL/RS Art/Music/Theatre
EN Requirements GS - one-designated GS course at at least three different levels ; fifteen hours total ; six hours outside the major ; one experiential component
IS - six hours at either Level I or II; six hours at either Level III or IV

"CI" - ?
FL&C - X number of hours (non-native EN exempt?)
Experience - 3 (prior to 4th yr?)
SL - X number of hours IS IS IS Group Expression & Society Designs of Nature Social Justice & Public Life 1st Dimension - Breadth Grouping 2nd Dimension - Depth Trajectories Skills/Proficiencies Knowledge Coherence & Integration Layer 2 details
Summative assessment?
"Comprehensive Exam"
Student-teacher-mentor-learner 1st level 2nd level 3rd level 4th level FY Inquiry Seminar (3)
Writ 100-level
GS 100-level
TechLit 100-level
Broad exposure to multiple faculty (IS intentionality)
Interactive moments between courses and faculty in general, common contexts emphasizing breadth

Current 100-199 Level II courses (6-9)
Interdisc or multidisc course
Comm-Intensive
Some 200-level retooled to suit 100-level and vice versa MITL "CI" Comp I (WI) Fund Comm (SI) HI (4 courses)
PL/RS
"Soc Institutions"
"Self & Society" Level II Science (4hrs)
PL/RS Art/Music/Theatre
EN IS - Bioethics, Violence, Xianity & Film, IS IS World History (WI) Ethics (FYS) AR (WI) Relationships between the flourishing of individuals and their communities & the forms of suffering and harm that need responsiveness from the global community Essential relationships of the creative & commuicative arts which demonstrate the complexity and diversity of our humanity and contributes towards the beautiful in our worlds Relationships of knowledge that frame how groups see, believe and act in and on the worlds they inhabit. Environmental Science (WI) 9 Hours:
3 GS
3 WI
3 MITL
FYS (GS/WI) World Religions (WI) Plagues (FYS) 6 Hours:
3 GS
WI production
Major-related
Capstone experience or work 21 Hours:
6 IS Requirements
6 WI Requirements
6 MITL Requirements
Summative Assessment 4th semester (end of 2nd semester for transfer students or upon entry?) SL Requirement at any level
6 hours FL & C
Experiential complete by end of 3rd yr
Quantitative Reasoning & Sci Literacy? The Language and Thinking Program at Bard College is a three-week writing course that begins in early August. Students read extensively in several genres, work on different writing projects, and meet in small groups to discuss their reading and writing. They learn to read and listen more thoughtfully, articulate ideas, and review their own work critically. Satisfactory completion of the program is required for matriculation into the College. Students who fail to meet this requirement are asked to take one year’s academic leave. Only one disciplinary course per group Moderation is undertaken in the second semester of the sophomore year. Through this process students make the transition from the Lower College to the Upper College and establish their major in a program. (Transfer students entering with the equivalent of two full years of credit should, if possible, moderate during the first semester of residence, but in no case later than the second.) Moderation requires students to examine their experience in the Lower College, their goals, and their interests; to evaluate their performance and their commitment to their chosen field; and to plan their work in the Upper College. Ought we to infuse Social Justice and label the first grouping differently - more a sythnesis of "Self-Society" and "Social Institutions"? Soc Justice appears in the following: GS, SL, Experiential, poss. IS, and within the "Learning Communities" (i.e. ignition in FYS) Relationships of knowledge that frame how groups see, believe and act in and on the worlds they inhabit.
Understanding abstract representations/interactions in the natural and spiritual world
Understanding of the complexities of the physical world
Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning; Abstract Reasoning
Understanding of the complexities of reality
Structural thinking
STEM
Objective/evidence-based understandings of the complexities of the natural world First-Year Seminar - IS and Ignition (introduction to the Core)
Transfer Seminar - IS and Ignition (introduction to the Core) CO 110- GS allowable
EN 111/112 - GS allowable
FYS - IS/Ignition/GS allowable
One "Design of Nature" course is Mathematics (either Level I or II)
Computer Compentency determined by major (but Comp Literacy requried to be rethought)
GS - one-designated GS course at at least three different levels ; fifteen hours total ; six hours outside the major ; one experiential component GS - three GS designated courses, one of those being experiential Homework: what counts as experiential, what is difference between Levels - years equate levels? what does a level mean?; what does a GS designation mean ; SL write out the requirement ; FL&C ; "CI" ; summative assessment ; How many in each group & level (horiz and vert) ; Belief & Reason University outcomes fall under these columns
Flexibility Writing is part of communication, but FA has shown a particular emphasis on the development of student writing
Already have Higher-Level thinking Skills as a standard across core courses
Increasing Rigor as students move through core (Lynn model-esque example) (Andria's table)
THESE ARE ILLUSTRATIONS ONLY, NOT INTENDED TO BE PRESCRIPTIVE SUGGESTIONS
Infusing writing, comm, mitl, and critical thinking throughout the core Relationships of knowledge that frame how groups see, believe and act in and on the worlds they inhabit.
Understanding abstract representations/interactions in the natural and spiritual world
Understanding of the complexities of the physical world
Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning; Abstract Reasoning
Understanding of the complexities of reality
Structural thinking
STEM
Objective/evidence-based understandings of the complexities of the natural world Relationships of knowledge that frame how groups see, believe and act in and on the worlds they inhabit.
Understanding abstract representations/interactions in the natural and spiritual world
Understanding of the complexities of the physical world
Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning; Abstract Reasoning
Understanding of the complexities of reality
Structural thinking
STEM
Objective/evidence-based understandings of the complexities of the natural world Understanding of the intersections of the individual with humanity through the lens of CSJ values
Relationships between the flourishing of individuals and their communities & the forms of suffering and harm that need responsiveness from the global community (i.e. economic, social, technological, environmental, spiritual, et al)
Connections between human needs and desires and living an orderly life

CSJ Values & Right Relationships Essential relationships of the creative & commuicative arts which demonstrate the complexity and diversity of our humanity and contributes towards the beautiful in our worlds
Interactions of emotion, cognition, and people connecting happenings to making sense of society
Aesthetics (& Beyond) Understanding abstract representations/interactions in the natural and spiritual world
Understanding of the complexities of the physical world
Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning; Abstract Reasoning
Understanding of the complexities of reality
Structural thinking
STEM Understanding and participating in the construction of society and environments through individual, collective, ethical, moral and responsible choices Understanding of what is uniquely human in all its complex expressions Understandings of how humans construct ways of reasoning and systems of religious/spiritual belief Objective/Evidence-based engagements with the complexities of the natural world Exploring what is uniquely human in all its complex expressions Social Responsibility How people make sense of, construct and order their worlds
How people make sense of and create meaning in their worlds
How people make sense of and construct their worlds
How people make sense of their worlds Creativity & Culture Belief & Reason? Explorations of Nature In May 2010, this taskforce defined interdisciplinarity as ‘’…a process of answering a question, solving a problem, or addressing a topic that is too broad or complex to be dealt with adequately by a single discipline or profession.”

In our discussions and research, however, we have moved beyond this definition to embrace something like the following definition: “the integration of knowledge across disciplines, narrow and wide, and the intercourse between (inter)disciplines and society.”

This definition demands a balance between breadth, depth, timeliness, and societal relevance, which mirrors some of our other concerns for the core curriculum, such as educating global citizens, literacy, writing and speaking, service learning, and co-curricular integration. A process of combining academic learning and service to the dear neighbor that provides students the experience to enhance/expand their education, to further develop community responsibility and to grow in self understanding. Writing Skills: ePortfolio models vary widely, adopting one of two models:
a skill-based emphasis (wherein the student demonstrates their ability to describe, compare/contrast, persuade, research, etc.)
a thematically-based emphasis (wherein they demonstrate how they have adopted the qualities of the “Avila Graduate”) Internationalism - at bare minimum, a relationship between two or more countries
Multinationalism - representation of the perspective of multiple nations
Globality - a relation, event or reality that supercedes national boundaries
Globalization?, Globalism?, Global Studies?, Transnationalism? E.g. standard classroom languages, culture/language, or professional-specific courses such as Spanish for healthcare professionals
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