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AP LIT Poetry

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Richard Kreinbring

on 2 November 2016

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Transcript of AP LIT Poetry



Had we but world enough, and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love's day;
Thou by the Indian Ganges' side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the Flood;
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires, and more slow.
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate.
Questions:
First besure you know the following words-look them up if you have to:
mistress
Humber
transpires
chapped
Now outline the speakers argument in 3 sentences beginning with If, But, and Therefore. Is the speaker urging the mistress to marry him?
Look at the phrase "vegetable love" (11). Is this appropriate? What simile in the 3rd section contrasts with it and how? What image in the 3rd section contrasts the distance between the Ganges and the Humber in section one?
Explain the figures in lines 22, 24, and 40. What are their implications?
Explain the last 2 lines. For what is "sun" a metonymy (look it up)?
Is this poem principally about love or about time? If the latter then what might making love represent? What philosophy is the poet advancing here?
Had he and I but met
By some old ancient inn,
We should have set us down to wet
Right many a nipperkin!

But ranged as infantry,
And staring face to face,
I shot at him as he at me,
And killed him in his place.

I shot him dead because—
Because he was my foe,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That's clear enough; although

He thought he'd 'list, perhaps,
Off-hand like—just as I—
Was out of work—had sold his traps—
No other reason why.

Yes; quaint and curious war is!
You shoot a fellow down
You'd treat, if met where any bar is,
Or help to half a crown.
What pupose does the repetion of the word "because" serve in the poem?
Why does the speaker repeat his "clear" reason for killing the man?
The word "although" comes at the ebd of a stanza in order to give it more emphasis. What purpose does that emphasis serve?
A critic has defined poetry as "the expression of elevated thought in elavated language." Discuss the adequacy of this definition in the light of Hardy's poem.
Characterize the speaker of the poem. What kind of person is he? How do you know?
Central Questions
Why did the writer chose poetry to convey the message?
How would it have been different in a different Genre?
What is the purpose of the poems?
Inform? Expand the reader's experience? Pursuade?
These can occur at the same time or switch.

Poetic Language is more layered and intense than ordinary language. Find examples of this.

How does the poem reach deeper levels of human experience and allow the reader to process his own experiences?

"Poetry has at least 4 dimensions."
Intellectual, Sensory, Emotional, Imaginative
Find examples that you think serve a specific example. What effect does the language have on you as the reader? What is the aim of the language?
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
Answer the following questions:
What are the specific points of comparison between the subject and the summer's day?

What are the specific qualities of the subject that make him/her superior to the summer's day?

What do these comparisons imply about the subject's moral and emotional nature? What do they imply about his/her physical (diss)similarities to the day?
Respond to the following questions in paragraphs:
What is Shakespeare's answer to the question he poses in line one?
How does he support that answer?

By what reasoning does Shakespeare justify his assertion that the "eternal summer", "shall not fade."?

In what ways has his prediction been bourne out, and in what ways has it failed? Look at the couplet.
Sonnet 18
Homework:
As a group chose 3 of the following sonnets:
15, 16, 55, 60, 63, 81, 101
Each group member should then print, read and annotate those sonnets.
Be prepared to discuss them tomorrow.
Read
This Poem
On your own
Write
In your groups,
discuss
Shakespeare Rules!
Yeah he does.
Homework
Welcome back.
Now get to work
and btw
Sit in groups so that all of the sonnets are represented.
Compare findings and consider the idea of immortality in verse. Is it possible? Come up with other ways that artists immortalize their loves.
Sonnet 130

My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.

I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks,
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.

I love to hear her speak, yet well I know,
That music hath a far more pleasing sound.
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.

And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.
Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
Look at these two poems.
What, what, what are the rhetorical strategies?
How are they (dis)similar?
Ballad of Birmingham
BY DUDLEY RANDALL
(On the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963)

“Mother dear, may I go downtown
Instead of out to play,
And march the streets of Birmingham
In a Freedom March today?”

“No, baby, no, you may not go,
For the dogs are fierce and wild,
And clubs and hoses, guns and jails
Aren’t good for a little child.”

“But, mother, I won’t be alone.
Other children will go with me,
And march the streets of Birmingham
To make our country free.”

“No, baby, no, you may not go,
For I fear those guns will fire.
But you may go to church instead
And sing in the children’s choir.”

She has combed and brushed her night-dark hair,
And bathed rose petal sweet,
And drawn white gloves on her small brown hands,
And white shoes on her feet.

The mother smiled to know her child
Was in the sacred place,
But that smile was the last smile
To come upon her face.

For when she heard the explosion,
Her eyes grew wet and wild.
She raced through the streets of Birmingham
Calling for her child.

She clawed through bits of glass and brick,
Then lifted out a shoe.
“O, here’s the shoe my baby wore,
But, baby, where are you?”
What do you know about the 1963 Birmingham bombing?
Take a look at this poem. How does it connect to Shakespeare's sonnets 18 and 130?
What's the tone? How Does it (the tone) compare to the sonnet's?
How does Marvell establish the tone?
But at my back I always hear
Time's winged chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy beauty shall no more be found,
Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
My echoing song; then worms shall try
That long preserv'd virginity,
And your quaint honour turn to dust,
And into ashes all my lust.
The grave's a fine and private place,
But none I think do there embrace.
To his Coy Mistress
by Andrew Marvell
gotta ask, what is "vegtable love"?
Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may;
And now, like am'rous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour,
Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power.
Let us roll all our strength, and all
Our sweetness, up into one ball;
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Thorough the iron gates of life.
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run.
THE FLEA.
by John Donne


MARK but this flea, and mark in this,
How little that which thou deniest me is ;
It suck'd me first, and now sucks thee,
And in this flea our two bloods mingled be.
Thou know'st that this cannot be said
A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead ;
Yet this enjoys before it woo,
And pamper'd swells with one blood made of two ;
And this, alas ! is more than we would do.

O stay, three lives in one flea spare,
Where we almost, yea, more than married are.
This flea is you and I, and this
Our marriage bed, and marriage temple is.
Though parents grudge, and you, we're met,
And cloister'd in these living walls of jet.
Though use make you apt to kill me,
Let not to that self-murder added be,
And sacrilege, three sins in killing three.

Cruel and sudden, hast thou since
Purpled thy nail in blood of innocence?
Wherein could this flea guilty be,
Except in that drop which it suck'd from thee?
Yet thou triumph'st, and say'st that thou
Find'st not thyself nor me the weaker now.
'Tis true ; then learn how false fears be ;
Just so much honour, when thou yield'st to me,
Will waste, as this flea's death took life from thee.
In both "Shall I compare thee" and "My Mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun" Shakespeare uses the sonnet form to consider(and reject) a possible theme for a poem. Compare the way these two sonnets employ figurative language, rhythm, and structure to support the task of negating what the poet considers a false premise.
Sonnet 116
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love ’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error, and upon me prov’d,
I never writ, nor no man ever lov’d.
Sit in groups please.
Compare how the poets use language to provoke an emotional response in the poems "The Ballad of Birmingham" and "Rice will Grow Again."
"Those Winter Sundays"

Imitation Writing-
Identify the key words in the poem-those that create the poets desired effect.
Now decide what effect you want to create and change those words to produce that effect.
For example:
Saturdays too, my sister slept in late
and threw on a sweatshirt in the chilly afternoon.
Shawl
BY ALBERT GOLDBARTH

Eight hours by bus, and night
was on them. He could see himself now
in the window, see his head there with the country
running through it like a long thought made of steel and wheat.
Darkness outside; darkness in the bus — as if the sea
were dark and the belly of the whale were dark to match it.
He was twenty: of course his eyes returned, repeatedly,
to the knee of the woman two rows up: positioned so
occasional headlights struck it into life.
But more reliable was the book; he was discovering himself
to be among the tribe that reads. Now his, the only
overhead turned on. Now nothing else existed:
only him, and the book, and the light thrown over his shoulders
as luxuriously as a cashmere shawl.
Introduction to Poetry
BY BILLY COLLINS

I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive.

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem’s room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author’s name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.
What makes a good reader and writer?
As you read 'em make a quick list of what the writers seem to want from their readers.
Think about the speakers. What can you infer about their beliefs on the value of literature?

How do they use humor to make serious point?


“Do You Have Any Advice For Those of Us Just Starting Out?"

Ron Koertge

Give up sitting dutifully at your desk. Leave
your house or apartment. Go out into the world.

It's all right to carry a notebook but a cheap
one is best, with pages the color of weak tea
and on the front a kitten or a space ship.

Avoid any enclosed space where more than
three people are wearing turtlenecks. Beware
any snow-covered chalet with deer tracks
across the muffled tennis courts.

Not surprisingly, libraries are a good place to write.
And the perfect place in a library is near an aisle
where a child a year or two old is playing as his
mother browses the ranks of the dead.

Often he will pull books from the bottom shelf.
The title, the author's name, the brooding photo
on the flap mean nothing. Red book on black, gray
book on brown, he builds a tower. And the higher
it gets, the wider he grins.

You who asked for advice, listen: When the tower
falls, be like that child. Laugh so loud everybody
in the world frowns and says, "Shhhh."

Then start again.
Here's what I think:

The writers want us to have a
sense of humor.
They want us to be
fearless
, right? Water skiing requires that you let yourself be pulled along by a force more powerful than you.
I also get
patient
from the poems. The man on the bus could've gone after that knee but he goes back to the "dependable book." He knows that she'll be there. There's also quite a bit going on. I need to look at different aspects of these poems. I want to just enjoy them but, hey, I also have to learn something. So lets call that trait
open-ness
. I have to develop that.
Some things are hard, damn hard, and confusing, and, I'll say it boring. I need to be
attentive
and develop the
stamina
I need to be a good member of the "Tribe that Reads (and writes)." You may hoot and hollah at the mention of the Tribe.
Lesson Two
Wilfred Owen
Dulce Et Decorum Est

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of disappointed shells that dropped behind.

GAS! Gas! Quick, boys!-- An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And floundering like a man in fire or lime.--
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,--
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.
In your WNB:
How would you convey a violent experience? How could you write in way the captures the feeling and experience?
Look at the following sentences:
The mother ambled through the darkness searching for her child.
The mother had ambled through the darkness searching for her child.
The mother ambles through the darkness searching for her child.
The mother will amble through the darkness searching for her child.

Which is the most emotionally charged? The least?
Which one places the reader closest? Farthest?
Which is subjective and which feel objective?


These are all about verb choice (syntax, friends, syntax).
Read it aloud.
Each person read to a comma, dash or period then switch. What words get emphasized?
One: Complete and turn in your Summer Work by making a folder on google docs. Call it AP Lit and your name. Share it with me so I can edit it.

In that folder make another folder call summer work and you name.
In that folder there should be 3 documents.
The Road-Reactions
Never Let Me Go-Reactions
Group Read-Title of the novel you read.
Two: Post your favorite poem to Tumblr. Use the #aplitpoem1.
Three: Get the poems from the list on edmodo.
Four: Get copies of the following books:
The Iliad and Henry V.
What you need for the next couple of weeks:
First Things First
Welcome Back, I missed you so much.

Five: Pick two of the observations from your WNB and turn them in to poems by changing the line breaks or you can pull out one part and expand on it or do both YOLO!
Keep this poem in mind as we read The Iliad and The Odyssey. Both poems are about war.
Lesson Three
If you wanted to compare a person you loved to that nice thing how would you do it? try to be as specific and detailed as possible as you describe how the person is like the thing.
Homework:
Paste a couple of pictures of "nice things" in to you wnb-no people. Also think of a person you love. Make a detailed list of all the things you love, or really like, about that person.

You also need to have Shakespeare's Sonnets numbers 18, Shall I Compare thee to a Summer's Day" , and 130, "My Mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun."
Side Bar:
End Stops, Enjambments and Ceasureas.
Use these to help you decide how a poem should be read.
Side Bar:
The Sonnet
Two Kinds
First The Italian or Petrarchan
abba abba cdecde
this is called an octave and sestet

Next, my favorite, the one you know best-The English or Shakesperean

abab cdcd efef gg
4 quatrains and a couplet.

Iambic Pentameter

iam, trochee (rhymes with pokey), spondee
Sit near in groups of 4ish and share your wnb assignment from last night.
HW:
Write a sentence that names the poem and the author and conveys the poem's theme.

Now rewrite it and this time include a phrase about tone or the author's attitude.

This time revise that sentence and see if you can expand that phrase to address the complexity of the poem.

Make sure you have tomorrow's poem. Read it tonight.
In your groups find all the verbs and label the tense. How do the shifts affect the meaning?

Poems are also about the "thing and something else." What's the thing and how's the poet getting to the "something else?"
What is Shakespeare's answer to the question in line one?
How do his examples support that answer?
Read Sonnet 130 and draw a portrait of the "lover" as Shakespeare describes her. The portrait will be displayed and graded by the day glo Jesus scale.
What are the points of comparison between the lover and the day?

By what reasoning does Shakespeare justify his assertion that the "eternal summer" of the poem "shall not fade?"

In what ways has his prediction turned out to be right?
Read "Out, Out" and write a response discussing how Frost's approach to violence is different than Owen's. Which do you find more effective?
Is that it? Hecks Naw Cuz! YOLO! Do this too.
Sit in groups and share your three sentences from last night. Who has the best 3rd sentence-that's the long one.
Is that it?
Nope
3 Sentences, just like the ones you did on Owen but on sonnet 18, and 130.
Read

Long pause at line one
Label Frost's meter. Why is he using this form?

The title is from Macbeth, but you knew that.
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
Wow, bummer, let's get out your portraits of Shakespeare's mistress. Leave them on your desks and do a walk through the room. Leave a couple of notes-what'd you find interesting or unexpected or mundane, horrors, mundane.

Now get in small groups, 4 ish, and rewrite the poem to make more expected, more like you's see in a normal poem.
Read this and look at "Out, Out" What is the effect of this allusion?
Where do both writers reflect on the insignificance of life?
Consider the boy's short life. How do we or you give meaning and significance to our lives when they can be snuffed out like the boy's or Lady Macbeth's? Respond in your wnb.

Part two break out a line and turn it into a poem.
If you're smart, and you are, you'll be prepared to write an in class essay comparing the way two poems employ figurative language and maybe form to support the writer's task.
Bring the "Ballad of Birmingham" tomorrow.
You need your homework about Frost and Owen. You need the Frost poem
Is that really it? Nope, as long as we're talking mistresses, get a copy of this poem.
All of the poems take the expected elements of love poems and change them in some way. Look at them and ruminate on how poets and writers take a form (genre, style, meter...) and change it. How does knowing what the form is supposed to be affect your reaction to it.

Post an example of any work of "art" on edmodo and briefly explain what the form is and how the author is working against it.
Side Bar
The Ballad Form

Meant to sung.

"Leaping and Lingering"

Simple rhyme scheme abab

"Burden" or refrain.

Use of question and answer format.
write an in class essay comparing the way two poems, Sonnets 18 and 130 employ figurative language, and form to support the writer's task.
Write and essay comparing and contrasting Shakespeare's feelings about the beloveds in the Sonnets 18 and 130. You should consider aspects such as figurative language and form in formulating your response.
You knew this was coming. You need a paper, pencil and your copies of Sonnets 18 and 130.
In your WNB record 8-10 direct observations of parents trying to keep their children safe.
Read the poem aloud two times with each person taking a different role.
In groups of 3, assign each person a role from the poem. Mother, Child and Narrator.

Find specific examples that highlight the child's innocence and the mother's love and care.

How do specific words highlight the grief of the final scene?

Blackout Poem
Create a Blackout Poem using a sharpie to black out words until you have a poem about the event.

Paste the newspaper into your WNB.
Even more?
Ok, since you asked, bring "A Study of Reading Habits" by Larkin to class tomorrow.

Also, in your WNB, write a description of your own reading habits. How do those habits reflect your personality.

Using the newspaper article about a current event that moves you.

Create another blackout poem. It should reflect your feelings about the event.
More?
Compare the writing in the poem to the newspaper article. How is the language different?
How does the poet's diction support the meaninging and effect of the poem?
How would you characterize the tone of the poem?
Larkin-a librarian, poet and scholar-is different from the speaker in what specific ways? What's the effect of this disparity?
Read the Houseman poem. Notice that he also creates a distinction between himself and his fictional persona.
Compare and contrast the ways that Larkin and Houseman create a distntly different speaker. How do the poems lead readers to negotiate the gap between the narrator and the poet as they convey their themes?
Get in the groups your were in for the Larkin poem. Review your notes and get out your pictures. What do you think the age of the speaker is in your stanza? How can you tell?
When getting my nose in a book
Cured most things short of school,
It was worth ruining my eyes
To know I could still keep cool,
And deal out the old right hook
To dirty dogs twice my size.

Later, with inch-thick specs,
Evil was just my lark:
Me and my coat and fangs
Had ripping times in the dark.
The women I clubbed with sex!
I broke them up like meringues.

Don't read much now: the dude
Who lets the girl down before
The hero arrives, the chap
Who's yellow and keeps the store
Seem far too familiar. Get stewed:
Books are a load of crap.

A Study Of Reading Habits
~Larkin

AP Lit and Comp
Launching the
Writer's Notebook:
POETRY UNIT
Write this at the front of your WNB.
It's our motto.
Writer's Notebooks (WNB)
Expectations
WNB's should be composition books or spiral notebooks-- not tiny journals.
You may personalize your WNB with pictures and quotes, if you choose

Your WNB will be brought to class daily.
It will be on your desk, open to a fresh page or yesterday's entry, when class starts.
If there are Glue-Ins for the day, you will get them from the podium and PUT THEM IN YOUR WNB. This is not optional. This is also why you need your own glue stick or tape.

You will date, label, and number each entry.
If absent, you will find out what entries you missed and complete them--then show them to me for credit.
WNB entries may not submitted late.
Many of these entries are done IN CLASS; if you are not doing them, then what ARE you doing at this time, exactly?


In order to determine your understanding of poetry writing at this point, please write a response in your WNB that answers the essential questions. Use specific examples from any poetry you have written in the past.

How do I
explore my life
and the
world around me
in a community of writers?
Which poets and poems
speak
to me?
As a poet, what
style of poetry
do I want to create?
What
decisions
used by poets can I add to my repertoire of
habits, strategies, and techniques
to enable me to write poems that engage readers?

(Questions are on the Glue-In, too)

Enduring Understandings:

Poets live wide-awake lives engaging in the world and creating poems that express the stories, ideas, and observations that matter to them.

They develop flexible thinking and a repertoire of strategies to make decisions throughout the writing process.
Pre-Unit Metacog:
Session One
The quality by which we scrutinize our lives has direct bearing on the product which we live, and upon the changes which we hope to bring about through those lives.

For women, [and men] then, poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action. Poetry is the way we help give name to the nameless so it can be thought.

—AUDRE LORDE
“POEMS ARE NOT LUXURIES”



Living wide-awake as a writer means watching, listening, paying attention to the world, especially to the small things.

If something catches your eye, trust that it matters in some way.

Then write to find out more about it. That thing that got you started might take you to a new idea, feeling, or attitude. You are writing to uncover, to name the small and ordinary things that matter to us.

Today you will start your writing life by writing to explore ideas, feelings, and attitudes that you notice in the world.

You will do two writes. Then you will share with two different people in a Turn and Talk.

Poets explore their world living wide-awake.

They pursue and explore ideas, feelings, or attitudes by generating several poems from various angles on the subject that intrigues them.

Read the poems and quotes on the Glue-Ins, and write a page in your WNB about your hopes, dreams, and the changes you are facing or will face this year--SENIOR YEAR!

If you have difficulty writing to the bottom of the page, use any of the following questions to keep you going:
What small thing keeps catching your eye?
What chore or daily activity do you secretly enjoy?
What challenges do you face?
What obstacles keep you from writing?
What is bothering you?
What do you love?
What do you hate?
What are you good at?
What is your favorite thing to eat, wear, or do?

WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED WRITING:
Reread your page and highlight or underline one word or phrase that seems to name what seems most important about what you wrote.




Independent Practice #1:
TURN & TALK
Turn to your geographical partner.

Read part or all of your writing to your partner.
Your partner will then select a sentence, phrase or word that interests him/her and comment on it.

Independent Practice #2:
Write the sentence, phrase, or word your partner selected for you at the top of a clean page. We will call this "Zooming In."

Write again to the bottom of the page. If you have trouble getting to the bottom, use one of the following phrases to get started again:

I didn’t realize...
However, now I understand...
So another way to look at it...
It isn’t as simple as it seems...
Let me explain...
So maybe I am wrong...

Before you Turn & Talk:
Reread your pages of exploring. Which write did you enjoy the most?

TURN & TALK
Select one of the following questions and talk to your partner about your writing.

How was it to write without a plan?
What was difficult about this writing assignment?
What happened to you as you started to explore a simple thing and kept writing to find something that might keep you writing to the bottom of the page?





Write a Found Poem to bring to class tomorrow.

Reread your notebook entries, and write a 10-15 line poem by simply pulling sentences, phrases, and/or words from one or all of the entries. Title it.


http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/007.html
"Do You Have Any Advice for Those of Us Just Starting Out?" (Glue-In)
(Glue-In)
ALSO:
Pay attention the world around you--plus the people in it--tonight and tomorrow morning.
INVITATION
The Writer's Notebook
Paying Attention
Watching
Listening
Living Wide-awake
is here
is important
is important too
is important
Observe the World Around you
facts, opinions, nature,
converstaion, arguments,
music, lyrics, etc...
Session Three
Writers live a bit of every day trying to be a writer.
This means writing every day.
This means watching the world every day.
It means to wonder about what we notice
and then writing about it.
Think about this:
Which observation did you feel connected to?
In what way does it connect to you?
What did you observe today on the way to school?



Turn & Talk:
Share the observation you felt connected to and in what way you felt connected.
Listen to each other and then share the observation you made on the way to school.

Look around the room or out the window or into your memory.

Write for
seven minutes
on a single observation. One of the goals here is to build stamina as a writer, too--try not to lift your pen or pencil!

•Include a detailed description of what you saw, heard, or smelled.

•Then allow yourself to stray and write down the thoughts that come to mind as you continue observing (or remembering the observation).

•You are not a participant in this observation, but somehow watching it seems fascinating, and you are wondering now about what you see, hear and/or smell.



(Glue-In)
Independent Practice
Then start a new page and write seven minutes on a second observation (in the room or from your memory).
TURN & TALK
Read one of your observations & thoughts to a partner.

Listeners will notice a detail that seems interesting and repeat back the phrase or sentence that describes the observation.
INVITATION
Capture 5-10 (7-minute) observations.

Go to a park, the mall, the corner of your neighborhood.

Pay attention on the bus or in your car as you go home from school or work. Pay attention at lunch or in A.C.

Collect observations and write a description and thoughts initiated by the observation.

Turn one observation into a 10 line poem OR
turn three observations into a 3-stanza poem.


Due at the start of the hour tomorrow
Session Four
Writers in a community use non-judgmental response so all writers feel free to take risks
and feel comfortable exposing stories that matter and parts of themselves to their classmates.
Form response groups of FOUR people in your geographical area and take turns reading one of the drafts you are most interested in sharing.

Select a timer who will start and stop each writer. Each writer gets about five minutes.
DUE: Observation Poem
Listeners will tell the writer what they found most memorable about their entries and make non-judgmental statements using the following sentence starters:

•I noticed…
•The line that sticks out for me is…
•The part I remember best is…
•I felt…when this happened in the story…
•I wish I knew more about…
•I wonder…
•This part in the story reminded me of…

The writer will take notes on the nonjudgmental feedback in his/her WNB.

Select
two
of the following questions.
Write a
metacognitive

entry
in your WNB. (Questions are also on your Glue-In)

1.How did it feel for a group of readers to respond to your writing?
2.What intentional decisions did the response group notice in your writing?
3.What did the response group notice that helped you see in your writing in a new way?
4.What did you learn from responding to the writing of your classmates?

Task
INVITATION
Write a poem
giving advice
to someone who is just learning something.
It can be to a writer, football player, skateboarder, driver--anything!

You pick the thing that has to be learned.
Write as if you are the expert and give both big advice that seems logical and small advice that might not seem important to someone who isn’t as skilled as you.
Write 15-25 lines.
Reading Immersion and Collecting Entries



You will write three poems after studying how poets use a repertoire of technical and structural decisions to write.
The combination of decisions a poet uses actually creates his/her style. In a similar way, you will be making decisions as they write to combine technical and structural decisions.

Coming Up!
*You will need a collection of poetry by ONE POET. IT MUST BE A BOOK!
Session Five
"No ideas but in things. Center on the everyday circumstances of life and the lives of common people."
William Carlos Williams

"No great poet is afraid of being himself. Tell stories that reflect the actual culture, include their suffering, love of music, laughter, and language itself."
Langston Hughes

"Write inside out. Experiment radically with form, punctuation, spelling and syntax; abandon traditional techniques and structures; create a new means of poetic expression."
e.e. cummings

Habit:
Poets study the decisions of other poets in order to develop a personal way of writing about the world. This stylistic approach comes from years of study and experimentation with these decisions.

We're going to look closely at several poets to examine their decisions about writing and the poems that emerged from those decisions. In doing this work, you will begin to compile a list of decisions to consider using in your own work as you experiment and generate new poems.
Model:
Listen as I share my list of technical/stylistic decisions I have noticed in the work of my mentor poet; I will tell you what decisions I used when writing my own poem and why.

And don't judge my poetry skills :) Thanks.
Poetic Techniques/Decisions
Diction [connotation and denotation]
Line breaks and white space
Repetition
Figurative language
Allusions [literary, historical, or mythological]
Punctuation
Capitalization
Let's look at poems by William Carlos Williams, Langston Hughes, and ee cummings. We will read one poem by each mentor poet and discuss the techniques we see.

Then you will work with your partner to study poetry by one of the mentor poets.

Eventually, you will write a poem that employs some of the techniques you identified in the mentor poet's work.
Spring and All
by William Carlos Williams

By the road to the contagious hospital
under the surge of the blue
mottled clouds driven from the
northeast-a cold wind. Beyond, the
waste of broad, muddy fields
brown with dried weeds, standing and fallen

patches of standing water
the scattering of tall trees

All along the road the reddish
purplish, forked, upstanding, twiggy
stuff of bushes and small trees
with dead, brown leaves under them
leafless vines-

Lifeless in appearance, sluggish
dazed spring approaches-

They enter the new world naked,
cold, uncertain of all
save that they enter. All about them
the cold, familiar wind-

Now the grass, tomorrow
the stiff curl of wildcarrot leaf
One by one objects are defined-
It quickens: clarity, outline of leaf

But now the stark dignity of
entrance-Still, the profound change
has come upon them: rooted, they
grip down and begin to awaken

Theme for English B
by Langston Hughes

The instructor said,

Go home and write
a page tonight.
And let that page come out of you--
Then, it will be true.

I wonder if it's that simple?
I am twenty-two, colored, born in Winston-Salem.
I went to school there, then Durham, then here
to this college on the hill above Harlem.
I am the only colored student in my class.
The steps from the hill lead down into Harlem,
through a park, then I cross St. Nicholas,
Eighth Avenue, Seventh, and I come to the Y,
the Harlem Branch Y, where I take the elevator
up to my room, sit down, and write this page:

It's not easy to know what is true for you or me
at twenty-two, my age. But I guess I'm what
I feel and see and hear, Harlem, I hear you:
hear you, hear me--we two--you, me, talk on this page.
(I hear New York, too.) Me--who?
Well, I like to eat, sleep, drink, and be in love.
I like to work, read, learn, and understand life.
I like a pipe for a Christmas present,
or records--Bessie, bop, or Bach.
I guess being colored doesn't make me not like
the same things other folks like who are other races.
So will my page be colored that I write?

Being me, it will not be white.
But it will be
a part of you, instructor.
You are white--
yet a part of me, as I am a part of you.
That's American.
Sometimes perhaps you don't want to be a part of me.
Nor do I often want to be a part of you.
But we are, that's true!
As I learn from you,
I guess you learn from me--
although you're older--and white--
and somewhat more free.

This is my theme for English B.
in Just—
by ee cummings

in Just—
spring when the world is mud-
luscious the little
lame balloonman

whistles far and wee

and eddieandbill come
running from marbles and
piracies and it’s
spring

when the world is puddle-wonderful

the queer
old balloonman whistles
far and wee
and bettyandisabel come dancing

from hop-scotch and jump-rope and


it’s
spring
and
the

goatfooted
balloonMan whistles
far
and
wee

While you study the poems, mark them up.

Create a chart in your WNB of the techniques you are finding in the poetry of your mentor poet.
Select one poem that has two or more technical decisions that you admire and would like to try. Hand-write and annotate the poem in your WNB.

Here is an example:
Independent Practice
Report-Out:
Let's make a cumulative list in our WNB of the devices that poets used. This list will remind us of the range of decisions poets make
INVITATION
Write a poem under the influence of your mentor.

Use the same techniques in your poem.
Use a different subject and make your poem shorter or longer.

"It is hard for me to separate my development as a reader of poems from my career as a poet. If my readings have any sensitivity, it is because I have paid close attention to how my own poems worked, and to which ways and to what extent I might improve them." Mark Strand ~ On Becoming a Poet
Session Six

Finding a Mentor Poet
Poets read a range of poetry to study it and find a poet they admire and wish to study more deeply.

They study the basic repertoire of technical and structural decisions used by all poets in a variety of stylistic ways.

Through this study and experimentation with this repertoire, they make decisions to craft their own poetry and create their own style of writing.
MODEL:
Listen as I read one of my favorite poems.
After I read it, I will tell you about the technical and/or structural decisions I like that the poet makes and explain why I think they are effective.
Then I will talk about what, in my opinion, is the purpose of the poem.



Read the second mentor poem and notice if the poet uses the same decisions in this poem as well.
What does the poet do that is different?
What do you like about this poet or this poem?

WRITE YOUR THOUGHTS IN YOUR WNB
Turn and Talk
Turn to your geographical partner.

Share your observations of the mentor poem. Explain what you think the poet was trying to help a reader understand when she/he use the technique or structure.
Identify two or three things you noticed and admired.
Explain your reasons for admiring the work. What is the effect on them as a reader?
Report Out to the Class
Independent Practice
Purposes for Poems
• Express personal reaction
• Illustrate an idea
• Reflect on and change a past way of seeing or understanding
• Argue a way of seeing or understanding
• Offer advice

Independent Practice
Read three poems of four different poets.
Keep a list of the poems that you read by each poet.
Decide which poet you like the best.
Then select a single poem from that poet.
~Make a list of 3-5 techniques or structures that you admire.
~Determine the purpose for the poem using the list of
purposes on the chart.
~Write a paragraph explaining how the poet’s technical and
structural decisions accomplish what he said about writing
poetry.

(see Glue-In)

Turn and Talk
First, reread your favorite poem again, in preparation for reading it aloud to your group.
Now, take turns reading your poems to each other.
Go to the book store or a library to find a collection of poems by a poet you admire. Purchase the collection or check the book out of the library. You will use this book for the rest of the unit as you study the decisions of this single poet and write your own poems.
Get a book of poetry by a favorite poet
(NO kids' poems or lyrics--see the acceptable poets list)
INVITATION
DUE DATE:
To prepare for session six: You will need one of your own drafted poems to work with.
Building The Tribe
Session Seven


Poets study the structures and shifts other poets use to craft a poem. They experiment with these structures as they draft and redraft to explore an emerging poem.
By studying the “chunks” of the poems, the order and shifts become more visible. Structuring order and shifts are an important part of helping a reader construct the poem’s meaning and feel connected to the idea or feelings expressed in the poem.
Chunking
Model
Listen first as I read the poem "Those Winter Sundays." Then we will read it together, in unison.

Let me tell you where I see “chunks” of meaning in this poem. There is no“right” answer for these “chunks"; one person might say a chunk is imagery and another might call that same thing observation.
The goal is to notice a “chunk” and give it a name.


THOSE WINTER SUNDAYS
by Robert Hayden

Sundays too my father got up early
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,
then with cracked hands that ached from labor
in the weekday weather made banked fires blaze.
No one ever thanked him.

I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he'd call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,

Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.

What did I know, what did I know
of love's austere and lonely offices?





Chunk
Small Moment


Comment
Sensory detail & action (person 1)
Small Moment
Sensory detail & action (person 2)
Comment
Question
Notice the lines/chunks that create a shift in the poem. It might be a change of setting or time, or the focus on a character, idea, or feeling. The poem’s chunks add up to help me understand the poem’s meaning; the shift also impacts my understanding of the meaning.
THOSE WINTER SUNDAYS
by Robert Hayden

Sundays too my father got up early
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,
then with cracked hands that ached from labor
in the weekday weather made banked fires blaze.
No one ever thanked him.

I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he'd call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,

Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.

What did I know, what did I know
of love's austere and lonely offices?





Making Meaning
Most adults get up early on weekdays for work; this dad gets up early on Sundays, as well.
This dad worked outside in the "weekday weather." During the week, he works on behalf of his family. On weekends, he continues to work for the family.
No one thanked him? Not the wife? None of the other kids? Not the speaker, for sure.
SHIFT to what the speaker did do.
(What the speaker did not do.)
Listen and wait, and fear.
"Indifferently" means having no interest or concern. The speaker speaks like this to his father, after his father made the house toasty and made his shoes presentable (for church, I assume). Typical of kids, perhaps? What does he say to his dad, I wonder?
Shift
I bet the speaker didn't realize the dad had done these things -- driven away cold and polish shoes--as a child. Only in adulthood does the speaker acknowledge that the dad should have been thanked, for his actions showed the love he had for his family.
"austere" means strict or plain.
"offices" means a beneficial act performed for another. It is a obligation, a duty.
Regret? Bitterness? New understanding?
Notice the sounds (alliteration and consonance--"k" sound)
Chonic = Cronus-- Greek god, father of Zeus, who ate his own children. Connection?
opposites
The dad was not "warm," but he made the house physically warm.
Partner Work
Read the second poem, “Elisabeth” by Donald Graves.

Identify the “chunks.” Agree on a name. Identify what seems like an important shift in the poem. Decide what the poem means, how the structure (chunks) helps you understand that meaning and how the shift impacts your understanding of the meaning.

*Label the chunks in the left margins. Make meaning on the poem and in the right margin.



We will come back together in about 10 to 15 minutes.
ELISABETH
by Donald Graves

A clump of boys
from fourth grade
stand on the playground
not speaking about
much of anything at all
until talk of love and girls
sneaks in from the edges
of somewhere.

“I love Elisabeth Lindberg,”
I say quickly, thinking
my early statement might
get me first dibs.

“So do I,” says Jimmy.
“Me too,” interrupts Robert.
“I’ve loved her ever since
first grade,” argues Nicky.
“No, no,” she knows I love her
shouts Paul, “I told her.”
“You did!” we chorus.
“What did she say?”
“Nothing.”

Possible labels for chunks:
Comment
Dialogue
Observation
Shift
Imagery
Questioning
(PART TWO)
Early notebook entry-drafts can be redrafted by revising the structure.

Poets play with the structures of their poems to explore various ways the poem could be imagine or to find another poem in this first draft that seems intriguing but offers other opportunities.
Model
Let's look at one of my early drafts of a poem; I'll show you an experiment I did on the poem using one of our mentor poem's structures.
Select one of the generated structures studied today.
Revise a previously drafted poem using this new structure.
Give credit to the poet you studied by writing “After…..and poet’s name” under the title of your poem.
Commit to staying true to the structure for this single revision experiment.
Independent Practice




Reread the mentor poems you have studied. Make a list of possible “chunks” you might use. Create an order/structure.

Rewrite a draft already in your notebook
using this new structure.


Small Group Read-Around

Read aloud one of your favorite entries. Afterward, tell the group why you are connected to this entry.
What happened to your original idea as you tried this new structure?
How might you use this technique with other first drafts of revision drafts?
Jot in your WNB:
INVITATION
Mentor Poets
"We all need someone we can feed on. Well, if you want it, you can feed on me"
~Mick Jagger/Keith Richards

Assignment
You knew there'd be one.
Us & Co. by Tracy K. Smith, Life on Mars

We are here for what amounts to a few hours,
a day at most.

We feel around making sense of the terrain,
our own new limbs,

Bumping up against a herd of bodies
until one becomes home.

Moments sweep past. The grass bends
then learns again to stand.
WHEN YOUR SMALL FORM TUMBLED INTO ME

I lay sprawled like a big-game rug across the bed:
Belly down, legs wishbone-wide. It was winter.
Workaday. Your father swung his feet to the floor.
The kids upstairs dragged something back and forth
On shrieking wheels. I was empty, blown-through
By whatever swells, swirling, and then breaks
Night after night upon that room. You must have watched
For what felt like forever, wanting to be
What we passed back and forth between us like fire.
Wanting weight, desiring desire, dying
To descend into flesh, fault, the brief ecstasy of being.
From what dream of world did you wriggle free?
What soared — and what grieved — when you aimed your will
At the yes of my body alive like that on the sheets?
The Universe Is a House Party

The universe is expanding. Look: postcards
And panties, bottles with lipstick on the rim,

Orphan socks and napkins dried into knots.
Quickly, wordlessly, all of it whisked into file

With radio waves from a generation ago,
Drifting to the edge of what doesn’t end,

Like the air inside a balloon. Is it bright?
Will our eyes crimp shut? Is it molten, atomic,

A conflagration of suns? It sounds like the kind of party
Your neighbors forget to invite you to: bass throbbing

Through walls, and everyone thudding around drunk
On the roof. We grind lenses to an impossible strength,

Point them toward the future, and dream of beings
We’ll welcome with indefatigable hospitality:

How marvelous you’ve come! We won’t flinch
At the pinprick mouths, the nubbin limbs. We’ll rise,

Gracile, robust. Mi casa es su casa. Never more sincere.
Seeing us, they’ll know exactly what we mean.

Of course, it’s ours. If it’s anyone’s, it’s ours.

Her collection is called:
Life on Mars.

My Mentor Poet for 2013 is (tada):
Tracy K. Smith.
This is the poem that first drew my attention.
Now turn and talk to the person next to you.
Where do you have common ideas and expectations?
Where do you differ?

Read Superman and Me and Learning to Read
How are the two views similar? Different.
In your WNB discuss your own experience.
You also need to get a copy of the poem "out, Out" br Robert Frost.
Out, Out—’
BY ROBERT FROST
The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
Five mountain ranges one behind the other
Under the sunset far into Vermont.
And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,
As it ran light, or had to bear a load.
And nothing happened: day was all but done.
Call it a day, I wish they might have said
To please the boy by giving him the half hour
That a boy counts so much when saved from work.
His sister stood beside him in her apron
To tell them ‘Supper.’ At the word, the saw,
As if to prove saws know what supper meant,
Leaped out at the boy’s hand, or seemed to leap—
He must have given the hand. However it was,
Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!
The boy’s first outcry was a rueful laugh,
As he swung toward them holding up the hand
Half in appeal, but half as if to keep
The life from spilling. Then the boy saw all—
Since he was old enough to know, big boy
Doing a man’s work, though a child at heart—
He saw all was spoiled. ‘Don’t let him cut my hand off—
The doctor, when he comes. Don’t let him, sister!’
So. But the hand was gone already.
The doctor put him in the dark of ether.
He lay and puffed his lips out with his breath.
And then—the watcher at his pulse took fright.
No one believed. They listened to his heart.
Little—less—nothing!—and that ended it.
No more to build on there. And they, since they
Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.
Let's look at a three-step approach to text. (I know. Everything is text.)


Step Three:

Extension

Think about larger aspects of poem. Look into the poet's history. Think about how the poem fits into a larger context. Historical, philosophical, political, intellectual, artistic, it's all fair me here.

Does it matter if you know that this is based on a true event from Frost's life? It happened in 1915 to the son of Frost's neighbor.

Does it matter that this kind of child labor was legal until 1924?



Tuck the poem in to your WNB.
Read the poem.
Step One:
Experience
Respond based on your own experience. Experience the moves that the poet makes. Write what you think.
Here it is:
I. Experience-They Say...
II. Analysis-I Say...
III. Extension-Here's why it matters...

Analysis
Next up, we're going to beat the poem, just a little bit.

Notice, notice, notice, patterns, moves, techniques...



"Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing."
Macbeth V. v.
Sylvia Plath
"Mirror"

Print a glue in-able copy of Sylvia Plath's poem, "Mirror, and Picasso's painting "The Girl Before the Mirror".
Pre-reading
Mirror
I am silver and exact. I have no preconceptions.
Whatever I see I swallow immediately
Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike.
I am not cruel, only truthful ‚
The eye of a little god, four-cornered.
Most of the time I meditate on the opposite wall.
It is pink, with speckles. I have looked at it so long
I think it is part of my heart. But it flickers.
Faces and darkness separate us over and over.

Now I am a lake. A woman bends over me,
Searching my reaches for what she really is.
Then she turns to those liars, the candles or the moon.
I see her back, and reflect it faithfully.
She rewards me with tears and an agitation of hands.
I am important to her. She comes and goes.
Each morning it is her face that replaces the darkness.
In me she has drowned a young girl, and in me an old woman
Rises toward her day after day, like a terrible fish.

Sylvia Plath
In your WNB take 5 minutes and write a response to the painting.
Then read the poem using the experience, analysis, extension moves, and write down 8-10 questions you have about it. Star or highlight your top 3.
Invitation


Write a poem about an inanimate object with symbolic value. Use Plath's 2 stanza format, first person point of view and her use of personification and metaphor.
Next Up, get a glue in-able copy of "Storm Warnings " by Adrienne Rich
Change groups. Take your questions with you. Answer the questions.
Whats' the difference between the two stanzas?

Take 5 minutes and write about the painting.
Which is the girl? the mirror?
Compare the two.
Notice what's fragmented or distorted.

What's the difference between analogy and metaphor. Ask GSF if you need help.

Make a list of popular songs that connect tears to rain, clouds to dark times.

How does weather affect your emotions?

Make a list of weather and climate conditions and then write a corresponding emotion.

Write a quick page connecting your current emotional state tot the weather. Should we go outside?


Pre-reading
Analysis:
Find all of the words connected to weather, weather instruments or shelter.

Look at the connotations of these words.

List words and phrases that reveal her solitude, her inner weather.
Start your Poetry Projects. Bring in Macbeth.
get on ELI.
Sonnets
First lets talk meter, specifically iambic.

She bangs the drum it makes a dreadful noise


to be or not to be, that is the question

Shakespeare

My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.

Quick Write
In your WNB write a quick poem about your boo. If you can't decide which boo then write about an imaginary boo.
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare. group 9
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; group 1
Coral is far more red than her lips' red; group 2
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; group 3
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. group 4
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks; group 5
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. group 6
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound; group 7
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground. group 8
Each group gets a line or lines.
What is being compared?
We're going to do 2 readings of this poem.


Reading One
You love the subject of the poem. You adore her.

What words set that tone?


Reading Two
You're at the end of this relationship and she disgusts you.

What words set that tone?
In your WNB draw the mistress.
Label each part of your drawing with the words from the poem.

SONNET 116

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come:
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.
Sonnet 138

When my love swears that she is made of truth
I do believe her, though I know she lies,
That she might think me some untutored youth,
Unlearnèd in the world's false subtleties.
Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young,
Although she knows my days are past the best,
Simply I credit her false-speaking tongue;
On both sides thus is simple truth suppressed.
But wherefore says she not she is unjust?
And wherefore say not I that I am old?
O, love's best habit is in seeming trust,
And age in love, loves not to have years told.
Therefore I lie with her, and she with me,
And in our faults by lies we flattered be.
William Shakespeare
The World Is Too Much With Us
BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not. Great God! I’d rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.
Introducing the Petrarchan or Italian Sonnet
Yeah, it's named after him.
Fetch hat init?

The poem is made of an octave (8 lines) and a sestet (6 Lines.)
The rhyme scheme looks like this a b b a a b b a Octave and c d e c d e or c d c d c d for the sestet.

All of the parts have a special function too.
The first part of the octave is supposed to introduce a problem, question, desire, reflection or something then the second part develops it.

The sestet is suppose to solve or comment on the first part.

a
b
b
a
a
b
b
a
c
d
c
d
c
d
Octave
Sestet
The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;—
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not. Great God! I’d rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.
Got that? Good
Now before we go on, respond to this prompt in your WNB:
How would you respond to the charge that life is too much about "getting and spending" and that we are "out of tune" with what really matters?
These charges are over 200 years old. What do they suggest about the conflict between the world and the spirit? Again, respond your trusty WNB.
Have two different readers read the octave then the sestet.
Pick your favorite two passages and copy them into a dialectal entry. One side write it down, the other respond.
Look at the allusions-what's the effect of that?

Work out the meter and rhyme and all that.
TPCAST Method
Homework:
Get a picture of a fashion model who is unkempt or shaggy looking or windblown. Put it in your WNB along with a copy of Robert Herrick's Poem "delight in Disorder"

Delight in Disorder
BY ROBERT HERRICK
A sweet disorder in the dress
Kindles in clothes a wantonness;
A lawn about the shoulders thrown
Into a fine distraction;
An erring lace, which here and there
Enthrals the crimson stomacher;
A cuff neglectful, and thereby
Ribands to flow confusedly;
A winning wave, deserving note,
In the tempestuous petticoat;
A careless shoe-string, in whose tie
I see a wild civility:
Do more bewitch me, than when art
Is too precise in every part.

How does Herrick's own planned imprecision create a paradox?
What's the relationship between this poem and Shakespeare's sonnets?

Delight in Disorder
BY ROBERT HERRICK
A sweet disorder in the dress
Kindles in clothes a wantonness;
A lawn about the shoulders thrown
Into a fine distraction;
An erring lace, which here and there
Enthrals the crimson stomacher;
A cuff neglectful, and thereby
Ribands to flow confusedly;
A winning wave, deserving note,
In the tempestuous petticoat;
A careless shoe-string, in whose tie
I see a wild civility:
Do more bewitch me, than when art
Is too precise in every part.

Why is the distraction sweet? What is implied?
Find the personifications. What is the effect?
What is implied in that last line? What is the relationship between nature and art?
Tuck this into your WNB. It's by my girl Emily Dickinson. Take a couple of minutes to mark it up.

Tell all the truth but tell it slant —
Success in Circuit lies
Too bright for our infirm Delight
The Truth's superb surprise
As Lightning to the Children eased
With explanation kind
The Truth must dazzle gradually
Or every man be blind —
Today we're going to look at three poems where the speakers are trying to help us out in some way.
Get in groups of 3. Each person is going to read one of the poems aloud to the others. Before you do that though read it to yourself.
Tuck these poems into your WNB.
INVITATION
Write a poem
giving advice
to someone who is just learning something.
It can be to a writer, football player, skateboarder, driver--anything!

You pick the thing that has to be learned.
Write as if you are the expert and give both big advice that seems logical and small advice that might not seem important to someone who isn’t as skilled as you.
Write 15-25 lines.
Reference "To Those of Us Just Starting Out"

Here are a few to start with:
alliteration
Point of view
personification
imagery
How about the allusion?
What'd you come up with?
Look at one of your mentor poet's poem.
Apply the 3 step approach you practiced today to a poem from your mentor poet.

Welcome Back!
I'm so happy to see you.
First a little house keeping.

Log in to Google Classroom tonight. Use this code:
3fhgw2
Make sure all of your summer work is turned in. You need that to be complete before you can participate in our Harkness Discussion(s).

Also, take a couple minutes-about 10-and write about your First Days. What are your memories about them, first day of school, work, any first days. What made the best ones Best?

We might be going outside tomorrow--not kickball--so bring a blanket to sit on.
Assignment
Get in groups of 3-4 and prepare to share the lines of Iambic Pentameter you wrote yesterday.
SONNET 20

A woman's face with Nature's own hand painted
Hast thou, the master-mistress of my passion;
A woman's gentle heart, but not acquainted
With shifting change, as is false women's fashion;
An eye more bright than theirs, less false in rolling,
Gilding the object whereupon it gazeth;
A man in hue, all hues in his controlling,
Much steals men's eyes and women's souls amazeth.
And for a woman wert thou first created;
Till Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a-doting,
And by addition me of thee defeated,
By adding one thing to my purpose nothing.
But since she prick'd thee out for women's pleasure,
Mine be thy love and thy love's use their treasure.
Quick Write:
Look at the "nice things" in your WNB. Write down the qualities they have that make them, nice? What's the nicest thing.
Work out the meter and how it should be read.
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
Sonnet Challenge
Invitation to Extend Your Learning!
Write a sonnet on the subject of your choice adhering to all of the rules--iambic pentameter, 14 lines, abab/cdcd/efef/gg
This is worth 25 points.
Additional points will be awarded as follows:
Trochaic Shift: 2 Points/proper usage (Max 10 Points)
Spondee or Pyrrhic Shift; 5 Points/proper useage (Max 15 Points)
Weak or Feminine Ending 2 points/ proper useage
Impressive use of the form: Up to 25 Points
Artfulness: Up to 25 Points
Wisdom: Up to 25 Points
Delight: Up to 25 Points
Class Favorite: 10 Points
Eng Wing Favorite: Priceless

Highest Point Totals=A 100%
Meets Standards=80%
All Others

Turn in one copy of the poem to Google Classroom.
Make a hard copy of it where you mark and label where you made shifts and substitutions.
SONNET 20

A woman's face with Nature's own hand painted
Hast thou, the master-mistress of my passion;
A woman's gentle heart, but not acquainted
With shifting change, as is false women's fashion;
An eye more bright than theirs, less false in rolling,
Gilding the object whereupon it gazeth;
A man in hue, all hues in his controlling,
Much steals men's eyes and women's souls amazeth.
And for a woman wert thou first created;
Till Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a-doting,
And by addition me of thee defeated,
By adding one thing to my purpose nothing.
But since she prick'd thee out for women's pleasure,
Mine be thy love and thy love's use their treasure.

My 2016 Mentor Poet
Elizabeth Alexander
Take a couple of minutes to respond to this in WNB--Writing Side natch.
Okay, turn and talk.
Let's all talk now.
Stories
Not
Stuff
#storiesnotstuff
A Modest Proposal:
In the interest of promoting story telling and a richer more meaningful Senior Year, we pursue, collect and share stories with one another. Once a month I propose we devote a class period to this.
How it Works.
Pick a theme, tell stories on that theme.

This month's theme is "Firsts and Lasts".

We draw names out of a jar and take turns telling our stories.

Best 2-3 stories get prizes.
Rules for Storytelling:

No Notes!

5 Minute Limit!

Must be true to memory of the storyteller.
How to Vote:
Give the first storyteller a 5 out 10.
Rank the rest as higher or lower than 5 based on how well you think they did.

Text BRAINYWILLOW990 to 22333 once to join.
Storm Warnings
The glass has been falling all the afternoon,
And knowing better than the instrument
What winds are walking overhead, what zone
Of grey unrest is moving across the land,
I leave the book upon a pillowed chair
And walk from window to closed window, watching
Boughs strain against the sky
And think again, as often when the air
Moves inward toward a silent core of waiting,
How with a single purpose time has traveled
By secret currents of the undiscerned
Into this polar realm. Weather abroad
And weather in the heart alike come on
Regardless of prediction.
Between foreseeing and averting change
Lies all the mastery of elements
Which clocks and weatherglasses cannot alter.
Time in the hand is not control of time,
Nor shattered fragments of an instrument
A proof against the wind; the wind will rise,
We can only close the shutters.
I draw the curtains as the sky goes black
And set a match to candles sheathed in glass
Against the keyhole draught, the insistent whine
Of weather through the unsealed aperture.
This is our sole defense against the season;
These are the things we have learned to do
Who live in troubled regions.
-Adrienne Rich

Invitation:
Write a poem using an extended metaphor or analogy. Steal the metaphor from your mentor poet.
Stanzas
Narration to Dialogue
Speakers
Speaking Verb

Full transcript