Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Envy by Mary Lamb

Presentation of a poem using visual aids.
by

Nicol García

on 19 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Envy by Mary Lamb

Envy
By Mary Lamb

The Poem
Presented by Nicol García
Before Reading:
Born in London, England
Worked as a seamstress
Suffered from Bipolar disorder
Killed her mother with a knife during a mental breakdown
Cared for by her younger brother Charles, also a poet and essayist
When he died, she was cared for by family members and a nurse and was sometimes placed in asylums
About Mary Lamb (1764-1847)
Mignionet: An herbaceous plant with spikes of small fragrant greenish flowers
Ne’er: Abbreviation for never
Fret: Be constantly or visibly anxious
Bent: A natural talent or inclination
Vocabulary
A rose tree can't give bloom to all flowers just like humans can't have all talents
People should not be envious of each other because each person has unique talents.
A person may or may not know of these talents because it takes time and effort to fully develop them.
Overview of Poem
Speaker and Audience
Speaker: 3rd person, wise
Audience: Anyone who has ever felt envy
This rose-tree is not made to bear
The violet blue, nor lily fair,
Nor the sweet mignionet;
Explanation:
A tree can only have flowers of its own kind
And if this tree were discontent,
Or wished to change its natural bent,
It all in vain would fret.
Explanation:
If the tree disliked its qualities, it could not change even if it tried.
And should it fret, you would suppose
It ne’er had seen its own red rose,
Nor after gentle shower
Had ever smelled its rose’s scent,
Explanation:
If the tree wanted to change, it might be because it has not seen its own good qualities
Explanation:
If the tree could see its good qualities it would never want to be anything other than what it already is.
Or it could ne’er be discontent
With its own pretty flower
Like such a blind and senseless tree
As I’ve imagined this to be,
All envious persons are:
Explanation:
Envious people are similar to how the speaker imagines the rose tree: blind and senseless
Explanation:
Just like a flower takes time and effort to bloom, so does a talent that a person has to find.
With care and culture all may find
Some pretty flower in their own mind,
Some talent that is rare.
Figures
of
Speech
Personification
In the First Stanza
Or [
the tree
]
wished to change
its natural bent,
And if this
tree
were
discontent

It
[the tree] all in vain
would fret
.
[The tree]
Had ever
smelled
its rose’s scent,
And should
it
[the tree]
fret
It
[the tree] ne'er
had seen
its own red rose
Or
it
[the tree] could ne’er be
discontent
In the second stanza:
In the third stanza:
Like such a
blind and senseless

tree
Simile
In the third stanza:
Like
such a
blind and senseless tree
As I’ve imagined this to be,
All
envious persons
are:
Metaphor
Some
pretty flower
in their own mind,
Some
talent
that is rare.
In the third stanza:
Alliteration
In the third stanza:
With
care
and
culture
all may find
Poem Analysis
Poem's Structure
This rose-tree is not made to
bear
The violet blue, nor lily
fair
,
Nor the sweet
mignionet
:
And if this tree were
discontent
,
Or wished to change its natural
bent
,
It all in vain would
fret
.
And should it fret, you would
suppose
It ne’er had seen its own red
rose,
Nor after gentle
shower
Had ever smelled its rose’s
scent,
Or it could ne’er be
discontent
With its own pretty
flower.
Like such a blind and senseless
tree
A
s I’ve imagined this to
be,
All envious persons
are:
With care and culture all may
find
Some pretty flower in their own
mind
,
Some talent that is
rare
.
Meter:
Iambic tetrameter and Iambic trimeter
(8, 8, 6, 8, 8, 6 - 8, 8, 7, 8, 8, 7 - 8, 8, 6, 8, 9, 6)
Rhyming structure:
a, a, b, c, c, b, d, d, e, f, f, e, g, g, h, I, I, h
Indentation: every third line
Structure:
3 stanzas of 6 lines each
Poem's Importance to Humans
In the poem, envious humans are compared to the envious rose tree; the beautiful flowers that the tree cannot see it has are similar to the talents that each individual has that they have yet to discover.
Themes and Tone
Theme : It is best for humans to appreciate their own talents and not envy other people’s talents.
Tone: Cautionary, lecturing, encouraging, celebratory
Presentation!
And should it fret, you would suppose
It ne’er had seen its own red rose,
Nor after gentle shower
Had ever smelled its rose’s scent,
Or it could ne’er be discontent
With its own pretty flower.
Like such a blind and senseless tree
As I’ve imagined this to be,
All envious persons are:
With care and culture all may find
Some pretty flower in their own mind,
Some talent that is rare.
This rose-tree is not made to bear
The violet blue, nor lily fair,
Nor the sweet mignionet:
And if this tree were discontent,
Or wished to change its natural bent,
It all in vain would fret.
Envy by Mary Lamb
Thank You
Full transcript