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Five Years of the University of Michigan Library's Computer & Video Game Archive (TCDL)

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David Carter

on 17 September 2014

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Transcript of Five Years of the University of Michigan Library's Computer & Video Game Archive (TCDL)

Background
Opened in Fall 2008
Mission: To support the teach and research interest of students, faculty and & staff at the University as it related to video games.
Today
Over 5000 games for more than 60 different systems
Consoles, microcomputers, handhelds, board games
1. People have a lot of this stuff in their basements
About half of CVGA collection has been donated
People want the games out of their basement, but want them to have a good home.
2. Games are Odd (esp. for libraries)
Purchasing from odd places (such as eBay)
Work close with cataloging, labeling
DRM for games poses unique challenges for libraries
3. Old Stuff Still (Mostly) Works
Most old game carts can be resurrected by cleaning contacts.
Controllers are most likely to fail
For many systems, replacement is (presently) more economical than repair.
Five Years of the University of Michigan Library's Computer & Video Game Archive
4. If You Build It, They Will Come
In 2012-2013: 12,444 visitors, 11,550 games played
Classes across campus, including education, communications, screen arts, English, comparative literature, history, music
Special events
Conclusion
For the Future
Mobile Gaming
Local/student games
DRM challenges
Microcomputers
Commodore VIC-20 (1980)
TRS-80 (1980)
TI-99 (1981)
Commodore 64 (1982)
Coleco Adam (1983)
Apple IIgs (1986)
Amiga 500 (1987)
Amiga 3000 (1990)
Macintosh LC III (1993)
iMac G3 (1998)
PC (DOS)
PC (Windows XP)
PC (Windows 7)
Handhelds
Atari Lynx (1989)
Nintendo Game Boy (1989)
Sega Game Gear (1991)
Game.com (1997)
Nintendo Game Boy Color (1998)
WonderSwan Color (2000)
Nintendo Game Boy Advance (2001)
LeapFrog Leapster (2003)
Nintendo DS (2004)
PlayStation Portable (PSP) (2005)
LeapFrog Didj (2008)
Nintendo DSi (2008-9)
Nintendo 3DS (2011)
PlayStation Vita (2012)
Consoles
Atari 2600 (1977)
Odyssey 2 (1978)
Intellivision (1979)
Atari 5200 (1982)
ColecoVision (1982)
Vectrex (1982)
Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) (1985)
Atari 7800 (re. 1986)
Sega Master System (1986)
Sega Genesis (1989)
TurboGrafx-16 (1989)
Philips CD-i (1991)

David S. Carter
Video Game Archivist & Programming Librarian
University of Michigan
superman@umich.edu

@umcvga
http://facebook.com/umcvga
http://guides.lib.umich.edu/cvga
Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) (1991)
3DO Interactive Multiplayer (1993)
Atari Jaguar (1993)
Sega Saturn (1995)
Sony PlayStation (1995)
Nintendo 64 (1996)
Sega Dreamcast (1999)
Sony PlayStation 2 (2000)
Microsoft Xbox (2001)
Nintendo GameCube (2001)
Atari Flashback 2 (2005)
Microsoft Xbox 360 (2005)
Nintendo Wii (2006)
Sony PlayStation 3 (2006)
Vtech V.Smile V-Motion Active Learning System (2007)
Neo Geo X (2012)
Nintendo Wii U (2012)
Xbox One (2013)
Playstation 4 (2013)
Full transcript