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Point of View in Literature

Definitions and Examples
by

Tonya Davis

on 25 July 2012

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Transcript of Point of View in Literature

Point of View 1st person from one person's perspective uses 1st person pronouns I, me, my, mine
we, our, ours 2nd person the author stops the story and talks directly to the reader uses the pronouns "you" and "your" 3rd person 3rd person limited 3rd person omniscient Objective 3rd person also from one person's perspective uses the 3rd person pronouns he, she, they, it
his, hers, theirs author shows you EVERYONE'S perspective "omni" = "all" in Latin "scient" = "seeing" in Latin The reader doesn't see any of the
characters thoughts or feelings.
Think of it like a camera is recording an event. It only captures what is visible. The narrators position in relating to how the story is told. Definition: http://www.flickriver.com/photos/mastrobiggo/popular-interesting/ A different point-of-view Depending on the point of view,
a story can change drastically!

Let's examine the different ways an
author can narrate a story. Little Red Riding Hood opened the door to Grandma’s room and stepped inside. She sniffed lightly. She squinted at Grandma.

“Hello, my dear. Come closer.” Grandma patted the bedspread beside her.

Little Red moved closer to the bed. “What big eyes you have today, Grandma.”

“All the better to see you with, my dear.” Example: Little Red Riding Hood opened the door to Grandma’s room and stepped inside. She sniffed lightly. There was a strange smell in the room that she didn’t like.

She squinted at Grandma. Why was the room so dark?

“Hello, my dear. Come closer.” The Wolf patted the bedspread beside him. The girl needed to be closer so she couldn’t avoid the attack. The wolf’s mouth watered in anticipation of this juicy snack.

Grandma’s voice was huskier than normal. Well, she was sick, after all.

Little Red moved closer to the bed until she could see Grandma.

What was wrong with Grandma’s eyes?
“What big eyes you have today, Grandma.”
Drat, the girl sounded suspicious. He would have to quickly reassure her so she didn’t leave.

“All the better to see you with, my dear.” Example: Little Red Riding Hood opened the door to Grandma’s room and stepped inside. She sniffed lightly. There was a strange smell in the room that she didn’t like. She squinted at Grandma. Why was the room so dark?

“Hello, my dear. Come closer.” Grandma patted the bedspread beside her. Grandma’s voice was huskier than normal. Well, she was sick, after all.

Little Red moved closer to the bed until she could see Grandma. What was wrong with Grandma’s eyes?

“What big eyes you have today, Grandma.”

“All the better to see you with, my dear.” Example from Little Red Riding Hood: ("Learn How to Write Fiction") ("Learn How to Write Fiction") ("Learn How to Write Fiction") ("Learn How to Write Fiction") (can also be known as subjective third person) I opened the door to Grandma’s room and stepped inside. I squinted at Grandma in the dark room.

“Hello, my dear. Come closer.” She patted the bedspread beside her. I moved closer to the bed until I could see her better.

“What big eyes you have today, Grandma.”

“All the better to see you with, my dear.” Example from Little Red Riding Hood: ("Learn How to Write Fiction") You walk into a room and see two doors before you.

A. You choose the first door. (Flip to page 27)

B. You choose the second door. (Flip to page 35) Example: ("Learn How to Write Fiction") "Point of View Subjective, Objective or Omniscient." Learn How to Write Fiction.
Learn to Write Fiction, 1 27 2010. Web. Web. 25 Jul. 2012. <http://www.learntowritefiction.com/point-of-view-subjective-objective-or-omniscient/>. References: "Point of View – First Person vs. Third Person." Learn How to Write Fiction.
Learn to Write Fiction, 1 23 2010. Web. Web. 25 Jul. 2012. <http://www.learntowritefiction.com/point-of-view-subjective-objective-or-omniscient/>.
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