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COM 105 Day 2

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Bernie Nofel

on 25 May 2017

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Transcript of COM 105 Day 2

More Effective:
Played on a smaller, enclosed field that resembles a hockey rink with artificial turf, indoor soccer involves faster action, more scoring, and different strategies than outdoor soccer.
Avoid critical overload. 

Give the other an amount of critical feedback that she or he can handle or understand at that time.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Present criticism in ways that allow the other party to make decisions. 
Do not force criticism on the other. 
Encourage the other to experience "ownership." 
People are more likely to comply with solutions that they generate.

Think QUESTIONS!
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Even though criticism implies evaluation, emphasize description. 

Before offering any judgment, describe behavior you see or have experienced.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Engage in perspective taking or role reversal. 

As you develop a criticism strategy or response, try to understand the perspective of the person being criticized.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
On Speech Day – a typed outline
Intro (At least a few bullet points or sentences.)

Main point “The first major race in alpine skiing is the downhill.”
Subpoint – supporting content
Subpoint – supporting content

Main point “The second major race in alpine skiing is the slalom.”
Subpoint – supporting content
Subpoint – supporting content

Conclusion
(At least a few bullet points or sentences.)
What’s Required for Class
Hard Copy due class before speech is due
General Purpose:
Specific Purpose:
Central Idea:
Main Points:
I.

II.

III.
What’s Required for Class
1) The Topic / Purpose Document
A statement in the introduction of a speech that identifies the main points to be discussed in the body of the speech.
Preview Statement
More Effective:
Because college athletes in revenue-producing sports such as football and basketball generate millions of dollars in revenue for their schools, the NCAA should allow such athletes to receive a $250 monthly salary as part of their scholarships.
A full sentence
Not express a question
Avoid figurative language
Not vague or overly general
Guidelines for the Central Idea
Is the purpose too trivial for my audience?
Is the purpose too technical for my audience?
Questions to Ask about Your Specific Purpose
Does my purpose meet the assignment?
Can I accomplish my purpose in the time allotted?
Is the purpose relevant to my audience?
Questions to Ask About Your Specific Purpose
A single infinitive phrase that states what speaker hopes to accomplish.

Simply completes:
“to inform….”, “to persuade …” (what)
Specific Purpose Statement
A method of generating ideas for speech topics by free association of words and ideas.
Brainstorming
1) Brainstorm topic
2) Identify a purpose, central idea and key points. (sound familiar?)
3) Develop an outline (consider a flowchart)
4)Write an essay (optional)
5) Develop a speaking outline
6) (Somewhere in there) write out an intro and conclusion
Process for Creating a Speech
Process for Creating a Speech
Let’s review the assignments and class procedures.
Include in your critical feedback a positive "outlet."  Reinforce positive actions and invite the possibility of change.

Invite the other to present criticism of you.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Focus criticism on behaviors that the other person can change.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Keep judgments tentative.  Maintain an "open door" of dialogue rather than presenting your "analysis" or "explanation" of another's behavior.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Invite a collaborative discussion of consequences rather than offering advice. 

Form a partnership to deal with problems.  Do not compete with the other party; compete with the other person against the problem.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Emphasize in your criticism your perceptions and feelings. 

Indicate what you think and feel about the other's behavior that you have described. 

Use "I" statements.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Direct your criticism to the present ("here and now") rather than the past ("there and then").
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Offer criticism of the person's behavior, not on her or his "person." 

Refer to what a person does, not her or his "traits," or "character."

Think “measurable, observable behaviors.”
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Understand why you are offering criticism. 

Feel confident that doing so is appropriate to the situation and constructive for the parties involved. 

Criticism voiced out of self-interest or competition may be destructive.
Critiquing
Guidelines for the Critic
Sandwich Technique

Good
Bad (or could be improved)
Good
Critiquing


General Purpose: To inform
Specific Purpose: To inform my audience
of the three major races in alpine skiing.
Central Idea:
The three major races in Alpine skiing are the downhill, the slalom,
and the giant slalom.
Main Points:
I. The first major race in alpine skiing is the downhill.

II. The second major race in alpine skiing is the slalom.

III. The third major race in alpine skiing is the giant slalom.
What’s Required for Class
The topic/purpose document
I. The first major race in alpine skiing is the downhill.

II. The second major race in alpine skiing is the slalom.

III. The third major race in alpine skiing is the giant slalom.
Main Points:
Ineffective:
Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula is an awesome
place for a vacation.
Avoid Figurative Language in the Central Idea
More Effective:
The laser is a highly versatile device with important
uses in medicine, industry, art, and communications.
Ineffective: Uses of the laser.
State the Central Idea as a Complete Sentence
Ineffective:
Paying college athletes a salary is a good idea.
Make Sure the Central Idea is Not Too General
One sentence that sums up or encapsulates the major ideas of a speech.
Central Idea –
same as thesis statement
More Effective: To inform my audience about the role of African-American soldiers in the Civil War.
Ineffective: To inform my audience about the Civil War.
Be Sure the Specific Purpose
Is Not Too Vague or General
Ineffective: To persuade my audience to become literacy tutors and to donate time to the Special Olympics.

To inform my audience how to tie a shoe and tie a tie.
Limit the Specific Purpose
to One Distinct Idea
More Effective: To persuade my audience that the U.S. space program provides many important benefits to people here on earth.
Ineffective: Is the U.S. space program necessary?
Express the Specific Purpose
as a Statement, Not as a Question
Write as infinitive phrase (“to persuade…..”)
Express as a statement, not as a question
Avoid figurative language, e.g., “awesome”
Limit to one distinct idea
Avoid being too vague or general
Guidelines for the
Specific Purpose Statement
The broad goal of a speech.
The major categories:
A: To inform
B: To persuade

Also,
C: To inspire/define the meaning of
D: To entertain
General Purpose
Includes two parts:
A subject
A viewpoint or explanation

“Rock Climbing is dangerous.”
“Bicycle repair requires 5 steps.”
“My dog smells like a rose.”
Topic
COM 105
Oral Communication









Instructor: Bernie Nofel

State the Central Idea as a Statement, Not as a Question
Ineffective:
How does indoor soccer differ from outdoor soccer?
OR
More effective: To persuade my audience to donate time to the Special Olympics.

To inform my audience how to tie a shoe.
OR
To inform my audience how to tie a tie.
More effective: To persuade my audience to
become literacy tutors.
More effective: To inform my audience how
yoga can improve their health.
Ineffective: To inform my audience that
yoga is extremely cool.
Avoid Figurative Language
More Effective: To inform my audience about the four major kinds of calendars used in the world today.
Ineffective: Calendars
Write the Specific Purpose
as an Infinitive Phrase

(Infinitive: “to” followed by verb)
Specific Purpose:
To inform my audience of the three major races in alpine skiing.
General Purpose: To inform
Central Idea:
The three major races in alpine skiing are the downhill, the slalom, and the giant slalom.
More Effective:
Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula has many attractions for vacationers, including a warm climate, excellent food, and
extensive Mayan ruins.
General Purpose: To inform
Specific Purpose: To inform my audience of the three major races in alpine skiing.
Central Idea: The three major races in Alpine skiing are the downhill, the
slalom, and the giant slalom.
Main Points:
I. The first major race in alpine skiing is the downhill.


II. The second major race in alpine skiing is the slalom.



The third major race in alpine skiing is the giant slalom.













Intro –
(a few clauses or sentences)
Main point (“Downhill”)
Subpoint
Subpoint
Main point (“Slalom”)
Subpoint
Subpoint
Main point (“Giant Slalom”)
Subpoint
Subpoint
Conclusion –
(a few clauses or sentences)

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