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Dubliners:"Eveline”

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M Joy

on 24 September 2013

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Transcript of Dubliners:"Eveline”

Dubliners:"Eveline”
So...what's the whole point?
Major Themes
Characters
Even when a Dubliner decides to take action against paralysis, paralysis itself holds him or her back from carrying out this goal
Eveline's Decision...
"She had consented to go away, to leave her home" (28)
"She was about to explore another life with Frank" (29)
...Eveline's Paralysis
"The white of two letters...grew indistinct" (30)
"She was to go away with him...to be his wife" (29)
"...but now that she was about to leave...she did not find it a wholly undesirable life" (29)
"Her eyes gave him no sign of love or farewell or recognition" (32)
Eveline Hill
Eveline= "wished-for" or "longed-for child"
Frank
Little is really known of Frank's intentions
"The Lass that loves a Sailor"
"Her eyes gave him no sign of love or farewell or recognition"
Father Mother
Assorted Characters
PARALYSIS
SIMONY
GNOMON
Sub-Themes:
More Symbolism
Window (26)
Evening and Avenue
(26), (27), (30)
Red Houses (27)
Citations
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Dubliners Theme of Inertia" Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 22 Sep. 2013.
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Dubliners Theme of Freedom and Confinement" Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 22 Sep. 2013.
Emigrating from Ireland
Immaturity VS Maturity
Britain VS Ireland
VS
Epiphany
Close Read Analysis (26-27)
Gnomon
Simony
Britain VS Ireland
Sisters/Children
GNOMON
Buenos Ayres (Aires) (31)
CORRUPTION:
-broken harmonium
-yellowing photograph
-unkept promises
"[c]lacking", "[c]oncrete", "[c]runching" =harsh world outside
"a field": leitmotif
Corruption
familiar objects (27)
Man from Belfast
Keogh the cripple & Ernest
"play together" with "the Waters"
Father: "hunt", "out of field", "blackthorn stick"
"dust"
"priest" and "Melbourne"
Later Discussion:
From Mental & Emotional to Physical Paralysis
Immaturity
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Characters in "Eveline" in Dubliners" Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 19 Sep. 2013.
Belfast Man
Ernest
Written by: James Joyce
Corruption of Catholic Church
Harry
Priest In Melbourne
"could hear a street organ playing. She knew the air." (Eveline, 30)
"broken harmonium" (Eveline, 27)
"odour of dusty cretonne"(Eveline, 26, 30)
"night air was bad" (Araby, 24)
"The air was pitilessly raw" (Araby, 23)
"odours arose from the ashpits" (Araby, 21)
"the dark odorous stables" (Araby, 21)
"Air, musty from having been long enclosed" (Araby, 20)
Dublin "Bad" Air
Harmonium: produces sound with currents of air
Buenos: Good
Ayres=Aires=Air
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Money in Dubliners" Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 19 Sep. 2013.
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Music in Dubliners" Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 19 Sep. 2013.
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Windows in Dubliners" Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 19 Sep. 2013.

Brendle, M. "B&N Community." Web log post. Paralysis and Epiphany in Dubliners. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2013. <http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Unabashedly-Bookish-The-BN/Paralysis-and-Epiphany-in-Dubliners/ba-p/684184>.
Sheerin, Martin. "E Names for Girls - Baby Names of Ireland." Baby Names of Ireland. N.p., 20 Sept. 2013. Web. 22 Sept. 2013. <http://www.babynamesofireland.com/e-names/e-names-for-girls>.
Money (28-29)
Street Organ: a portable harmonium
Mental Paralysis:
Emotional Paralysis:
Physical Paralysis:
Eveline does not venture away from the window, & continues to breathe in "the odour of dusty cretonne" (26,30)
The "distress" of leaving "[awakes} a nausea in her body" (31)
"She gripped with both hands at the iron railing" (31)
Eveline goes in mental circles around her childhood/past
"She had consented... to leave her home. Was that wise?" (28)
"If she went" & "Could she still draw back...?" (31)
-------------------------------
Miss Gavan: Dublin social pressures
The Bohemian Girl (29)
"she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence" & "he had begun to threaten her" (28)
But later on Eveline thinks...
"Her father was becoming old lately, she noticed;
he would miss her" (30)
"Sometimes he could be very nice" (30)
"A bell clanged upon her heart" (31)
"All the seas of the world tumbled about her heart" (31)
"he would drown her" (31)
"It was impossible." (31)
Due to Eveline's immaturity, she is at a further disadvantage in preparedness for leaving her Dublin home.
"Everything changes...she was going to go away like the others, to leave her home" (27)
"Home! She looked round the room, reviewing all its familiar objects..." (27)
"What would they say of her...Say she was a fool, perhaps" (28)
"She would not cry many tears at leaving the Stores" (28)
"She would be married- she, Eveline. People would treat her with respect then" (28)
"he had read her out a ghost story" (30)
"Ernest had been her favourite" (30)

-the Irish preferred their own government
"Ernest was dead" (28)
-the Irish government is dead and unable to protect its people any longer
-the Irish mourn for their loss of independence and self-govenment
"a man from Belfast bought the field and built houses in it" (27)
-Belfast man potentially a Protestant from N. Ireland =Britain
-Symbolic of Britain taking Ireland and installing its own influence
"new red houses" (27)
Red: Britain
VS
Melbourne, Australia was a hotspot for Irish immigrants in the 1800s
By leaving Ireland, the priest neglected his duties to the Irish
Symbolic of the Catholic Church's failure to stay true to the Irish
another instance with an absent priest
"...Harry, who was in the church decorating business, was nearly always down somewhere in the country" (28)
Harry is symbolic of the Catholic Church, and is never present at home (in Dublin/Ireland)
"the country", inferred as Britain
"she had nobody to protect her" (28)
The Catholic Church was failing to provide protection to the Irish
Frank's true identity is undefined & leaves the reader with a cloud of confusion, simulating the same experience Eveline is having with her choice
-we don't know why he wants Eveline so desperately
-we don't know why Frank and her father had a quarrel, nor what it was about
Eveline uses Frank to...
give her an identity
forget about outside pressures (particularly ones caused by her parents)
get rid of the mundane cycle of her life
Eveline does not take Frank's feelings into consideration, yet uses him for her own selfish purposes
-she sells him out
"Her father was not so bad then" (27)
"she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father's violence" (28)
"he had begun to threaten her and say what he would do to her only for her dead mother's sake" (28)
"her father had found out about the affair and had forbidden her to have anything to say to him" (30)
"Her father was becoming old lately, she noticed; he would miss her. Sometimes he could be very nice" (30)
"People would treat her with respect then. She would not be treated as her mother had been" (28)
"[reminded] her of the promise to her mother, her promise to keep the home together as long as she could" (30)
Her mother's life:
a "life of commonplace sacrifices closing in final craziness" (31)
"Derevaun Seraun!"
"The pleasure ends in pain"
Leading to the epiphany...
(32)
"She stood up in a sudden impulse of terror. Escape! She must escape! Frank would save her" (31)
Eveline stands, breaking her continuous/paralytic cycle of sitting at the window
She realizes that the only way to stop from continuing in her mother's footsteps is to "escape" with Frank
Eveline sees Frank as her savior, promising a life and happiness she otherwise would not have in Dublin
Eveline does not act on this epiphany due to her immaturity and emotional/mental paralysis
"Everything changes"
Full transcript