Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Romeo Character Analysis

No description
by

Vinay Chadha

on 4 April 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Romeo Character Analysis

ROMEO Character Analysis Concupiscent Attributes The Clash Inconsolable Audacious Romeo is saying that he would rather die then leave Juliet right now. He sounds extremely foolish when he says that because his life is seriously in danger. He is acting a bit crazy when saying that. He isn't worries as much as he really should be, and is taking it all really easy even in though it's a serious situation. His tone is a calm and relaxing tone. Well, in that hit you miss: she'll not be hit
With Cupid's arrow; she hath Dian's wit;
And, in strong proof of chastity well arm'd,
From love's weak childish bow she lives unharm'd.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O, she is rich in beauty, only poor,
That when she dies with beauty dies her store. (1,1,206) Euphonious She speaks:
O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art
As glorious to this night, being o'er my head
As is a winged messenger of heaven
Unto the white-upturned wondering eyes
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him
When he bestrides the lazy-pacing clouds
And sails upon the bosom of the air.(2,2,26) 'Tis torture, and not mercy: heaven is here,
Where Juliet lives; and every cat and dog
And little mouse, every unworthy thing,
Live here in heaven and may look on her;
But Romeo may not: more validity,
More honourable state, more courtship lives
In carrion-flies than Romeo: they my seize
On the white wonder of dear Juliet's hand
And steal immortal blessing from her lips,
Who even in pure and vestal modesty,
Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin;
But Romeo may not; he is banished:
Flies may do this, but I from this must fly:
They are free men, but I am banished.
And say'st thou yet that exile is not death?
Hadst thou no poison mix'd, no sharp-ground knife,
No sudden mean of death, though ne'er so mean,
But 'banished' to kill me?--'banished'?
O friar, the damned use that word in hell;
Howlings attend it: how hast thou the heart,
Being a divine, a ghostly confessor,
A sin-absolver, and my friend profess'd,
To mangle me with that word 'banished'?(3,3,29) Let me be ta'en, let me be put to death;
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.
I'll say yon grey is not the morning's eye,
'Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia's brow;
Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat
The vaulty heaven so high above our heads:
I have more care to stay than will to go:
Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.
How is't, my soul? let's talk; it is not day.(3,5,17) Of O, wilt thou leave me so unsatisfied?(2,2,125) By love, who first did prompt me to inquire;
He lent me counsel and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far
As that vast shore wash'd with the farthest sea,
I would adventure for such merchandise.(2,2,80) Alive, in triumph! and Mercutio slain!
Away to heaven, respective lenity,
And fire-eyed fury be my conduct now!

Re-enter TYBALT

Now, Tybalt, take the villain back again,
That late thou gavest me; for Mercutio's soul
Is but a little way above our heads,
Staying for thine to keep him company:
Either thou, or I, or both, must go with him.

TYBALT
Thou, wretched boy, that didst consort him here,
Shalt with him hence.

ROMEO
This shall determine that.

They fight; TYBALT falls(3,1,122) Why, such is love's transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest
With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs;
Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes;
Being vex'd a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears:
What is it else? a madness most discreet,
A choking gall and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.(1,1,183) Romeo is disturbed and extremely depressed after getting rejected by Rosaline. He gets very upset but it doesn't mean anything since he fell for Juliet and forgetting Rosaline right after.His emotions here don't mean anything. The attribute means getting sad and depressed and the quote here is an exact match. He gets over flowed with his emotions over something he will forget right after. Romeo tells Tybalt that since now Mercutio is up in and away above them, he must fight Tybalt until one of them or both die. This is a big sign of how Romeo is loyal to Mercutio and that he is basically risking his life for him. He got very upset by the fact that Tybalt had killed his best friend and his words before the fight and killing Tybalt help that fact. Romeos words and actions clarify his dedication and loyalty towards Mercutio. This quote has been very controversial as in what it really means. I think Romeo is referring to having sex when he means " unsatisfied" because like in the other quote he got really depressed that Rosaline was staying a virgin. I don't think he changed from Rosaline to Juliet and has a sexual motive. He goes off again using his words to create a connection between them. He tells her he would go far in to the sea to find such a treasure such as Juliet. His words are soothing for her to hear and it's what makes him a great talker and one to listen to. Loyal Romeo is getting depressed and sad because he got banished from Verona. He gets a bit crazy saying death is better and staying away from Juliet is like hell. He complains even though like thr Friar had said is that its much better then it could be .He over exaggerates the the problem. Romeo takes it to hard causing the Friar to yell at him. He gets over depressed over things which is a major key to his character. JULIET
How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

ROMEO
With love's light wings did I o'er-perch these walls;
For stony limits cannot hold love out,
And what love can do that dares love attempt;
Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.

JULIET
If they do see thee, they will murder thee.

ROMEO
Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye
Than twenty of their swords: look thou but sweet,
And I am proof against their enmity.(2,2,62) Let me be ta'en, let me be put to death;
I am content, so thou wilt have it so.
I'll say yon grey is not the morning's eye,
'Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia's brow;
Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat
The vaulty heaven so high above our heads:
I have more care to stay than will to go:
Come, death, and welcome! Juliet wills it so.
How is't, my soul? let's talk; it is not day.(3,5,17) Romeo gets irritated by the fact that Rosaline is headed towards chastity which means she is being absent in any sexual activity. Romeo getting very upset over that really infers that he is really just wanting the sex from the relationship. He just uses the word "love" but all i think it might be is lust. Right from the start Romeo starts using lines that compliment her. He sounds really good as he calls her an angel and glorious as the night sky. They flatter her and helps the chances of him getting her to fall for him. Romeo never gave up on Juliet and their relationship after being banned from the walls of Verona. He came back even with the chance of getting caught and being with Juliet. He tells her that he would rather get caught and die then leave her and Verona. This shows his loyalty towards Juliet. He wouldnt let anything stop him from getting back with her. Romeo doesn't seem to care much really that the kinsmen are their and is really risking his life to just see Juliet. His response was saying that love cant keep him out from their. His actions are really wild and very unadvised because he is just blocking out the fact he may get caught. Positive Negative By Vinay Chadha (3:40 - 4:24) Quote
Full transcript