Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

CEREBRAL PALSY

No description
by

Carolina Arroyave

on 24 January 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of CEREBRAL PALSY

CEREBRAL PALSY
Causes/Degrees of Severity
Prenatal

(gestational infection, brain malformation, prematurity)
Perinatal
(stroke, lack of oxygen or infection during birth)
Postnatal
(brain injury or meningitis after birth

Hypertonia- most common (70-80%); tense contracted muscles
Hypotonia- weak, floppy muscles
Athetoid- 20%; abrupt, large, involuntary movements
Ataxic- 1% to 10%; unsteady, lack of coordination and balance
Mixed- consisting of more than one of these types

Monoplegia- one limb
Hemiplegia- two limbs
Triplegia- three limbs
Quadraplegia- all four
Paraplegia- only legs
Diplegia- legs, less severe arms
Double hemiplegia- arms, less severe legs
Teaching Practices/ Inclusion in G.E.
Scaffolding Lessons into smaller chunks.
Sequencing and organization using audio-visual aids
Encourage independence
Modify physical environment to remove obstacles


In general about 50% of students with physical disabilities served in the general education classrooms.
Incidence in General Population
1
out of
323
children have CP. Most common motor disability in the US.

Around
8,000
to
10,000
babies and infants are diagnosed
per year
with cerebral palsy

About
two to three children
out of every
1,000
have cerebral palsy (United States studies have yielded rates as low as 2.3 per 1,000 children to as high as 3.6 per 1,000 children)
Definition
Cerebral palsy is considered a neurological disorder caused by a non-progressive brain injury or malformation that occurs while the child’s brain is under development. Cerebral palsy primarily affects body movement and muscle coordination. Though cerebral palsy can be defined, having cerebral palsy does not define the person that has the condition.
Eligibility Criteria
Cerebral Palsy is a chronic, permanent disability that will affect a child throughout his/her life.

A child is entitled to special education services (IEP) if his/her educational performance is adversely affected by a physical disability.

Lifelong Implications
Complex:
caregivers
speech therapy
braces/orthotic devices
communication aids
physical therapy
medication
History of Services for Cerebral Palsy
1893
- Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed Children is establish.

1900
- First special Classes for children with physical impairments begin in Chicago.

20th Century
-Two American physicians, Winthrop Phelps and Earl Carlson (who had cerebral
palsy) advocate for developing the intellectual potential of children with P.D. through appropriate education.

1948
- The United Cerebral Palsy Association is formed.

1975
- FAPE mandate.

1990
- American with Disabilities Act is passed

Resources/References
http://cerebralpalsy.org/about-cerebral-palsy/life-expectancy/
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/cp/index.html
http://cerebralpalsyresource.weebly.com/child-and-other-students.html
http://www.sess.ie/categories/physical-disabilities/cerebral-palsy/tips-learning-and-teaching
Heward, W.L. (2013). Exceptional children: An introduction to special education. (10th ed.). London: Pearson PLC
Trumbull, A.P. (2013). Exceptional lives: Special education in today's schools. (7th ed.). London: Pearson PLC
Full transcript