Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Pure Substances

By: Michael Jenkins, Bradley Dover, Wyatt Long, Reese Mitchell, Owen Wickman, and Noah Lowe
by

Bradley Dover

on 26 March 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Pure Substances

Mixtures are classified into 2 groups. Heterogeneous: Homogeneous: USSR Mercs(and Noah)
Presents: Pure Substances Overview Standards: S8P1.a - Distinguish between atoms and molecules.
S8P1.b - Describe the difference between pure substances(elements and compounds) and mixtures.
S8P1.f - Recognize that there are more than 100 elements and some have similar properties as shown on the periodic table of elements. A pure substance is a substance that has the same chemical composition throughout and cannot be broken down into parts by physical means, such as jackhammer, thermonuclear devices, or any other type of explosive. Lets get this straight...... An atom is the building block of the universe and everything in it...........
A molecule is a group of 2 or more atoms that are held together by very strong chemical bonds...... As you might have guessed, a mixture is the polar opposite. They can be broken down by physical means. If you take two pure substances, for example water and salt, then that makes a mixture (salt water). The mixture can be separated physically through evaporation. Pure substances can be divided into 2 groups: elements and compounds Elements
Elements are made of atoms. All atoms of the same element have the same number of protons Compounds
Compounds are composed of two or more elements. The compounds are combined in a very specific way. Let's take water,for example, there are 2 hydrogen atoms for every oxygen atom. There are pure substances and there are mixtures. Mixtures are generally classified into 2 groups. Heterogeneous mixtures and homogeneous mixtures. For a big fancy word, it is pretty easy to distinguish between the 2 different kinds. There are more than 100 elements in the universe, 118 to be exact. But they are all different, whether its the texture, how it conducts electricity, or whether it is a solid, liquid, gas, or plasma. Have a positive charge
The symbol for the charge is"+"
Located in the nucleus because it helps hold the atom together. USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs Electrons USSR
Mercs Have a negative charge
Symbol for charge is "-"
Located in the atom's energy levels, because we use them in bonding. USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs Neutrons Located in the nucleus of the atom, spacing the protons, so they do not repel in the nucleus of an atom.
Have a "0" or "neutral" charge. USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs All elements are pure substances. No matter what physical method you use, you cannot break pure substances into smaller physical parts. A compound is also a pure substance. A compound is made of two or more different elements that are chemically joined. They can only be broken apart by chemical reactions, not physical means. No matter how many times you have Baxter karate chop Rockie, she will remain Rockie. Same color, same shape, same smell, same density, same texture, same everything! USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs Question #2 USSR
Mercs The prefix homo- means same, so homogeneous mixtures are mixtures that have substances evenly distributed around the mixture. The particles of the substances are so small, microscopically small, so that means they cannot be seen by the naked eye. The prefix hetero- means different, so heterogeneous mixtures are mixtures that have substances distributed unevenly around the mixture. It is easy to distinguish between the different subtances in the mixture. USSR
Mercs Mixtures This is an atom Atoms have three parts: protons, neutrons, and electrons USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs Protons USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs USSR
Mercs Question #3 Question #4 Question #5 Question #1 What is the difference between a pure substance and a mixture? Question #1 Answer: A pure substance is a substance with the same chemical compostion throughout that cannot be broken down by physical means.......a mixture is the exact opposite. It can be broken down by physical means. What is the difference between a heterogenous and a homogenous mixture? Question #2 Answer: A heterogeneous mixture has substances distributed unevenly around the molecule and a homogenous mixture has substances that are evenly distributed around the molecule. What is an example of a pure substance? Question #3 Answer: Sodium Chloride (NaCl) is an example of a pure substance. You can hit it with a hammer, run it over with a tank, and drop a 2 ton weight on it but it will stay Salt. What charge does an Electron have? A Nuetron? A Proton? Question #4 Answer: An electron has a negative charge. A neutron has a neutral or "0" charge. A proton has a positive charge. What are a couple examples of a mixture? What is an example of a real world mixture? And explain why.. Question #5 Answer: Water (H20), Salt Water (NaClH20), and Chocolate Milk H20 Water is a mixture because the hydrogen and oxygen gas can be separated by boiling the water. NaClH20 Salt water is an example of a mixture because when the water evaporates away the salt will remain. Chocolate Milk Chocolate Milk is a mixture because it is a mixture in which the chocolate and the milk unevenly distribute (a heterogeneous mixture). They can be separated by letting the mixture sit for a few hours. THE END
Full transcript