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4 Step Art Critique Process

Mock-up Only-Work in Progress
by

Megan Hunter

on 5 June 2015

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Transcript of 4 Step Art Critique Process

4 Step Art Critique Process
REMEMBER
, WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN,LIST, NAME, CALL, DEFINE, IDENTIFY, RECALL, RECOGNISE, LOCATE


Description
The Art Critiquing Process
is broken into 4 steps;
Analysis
Interpretation
Judgement
Q
Q
Q
Q
WHAT DO YOU SEE?
LIST ONLY THE FACTS
And Information From the Credit Line
I. DESCRIPTION
II. ANALYSIS
How Is The Work Organised?
Break it down into small pieces to examine it
Identify Elements and Principles of Art
ELEMENTS
&
PRINCIPLES
OF
ART
III. INTERPRETATION
What Does The
Work Say To You?
Explain and Support your opinions
IV. JUDGEMENT
Is The Work of Art Sucessful?
Does It Have Artistic Merit?
Look At All the Points you have come up with
https://prezi.com/ofp56holcrhu/art-elements-and-principles/
THE CREDIT LINE
Name:
Lin Onus
Nationality
: Indigenous Australian
Date of Birth/Death
Title of Work:
Date of Work:
Material:
Dimensions:
Place:
Gallery of N.S.W.

ORDER,
ANALYSE, CONCLUDE, DECIDE, WHY, GIVE REASONS, IDENTIFY, DESCRIBE, METHOD, SUPPORT, HOW, RELATE, SURVEY, CLASSIFY, CATEGORISE
CREATE
, DEVELOP, DESIGN, DEVISE, IMPROVE UPON, IMAGINE, SUPPOSE, COMBINE, ESTIMATE, SYNTHESIZE, HYPOTHESIZE
PREDICT, WHAT IF, HOW
JUDGE
, EVALUATE, ASSESS, ARGUE, VALIDATE, GIVE OPINION, RECOMMEND, DECIDE, CHOOSE, DISCUSS, DEBATE,
*---------------
*----------------
*----------------
*---------------
*-----------------
*----------------
*----------------
*-----------
--SHAPE-
*-----------
*------------
*-------------
*-------------
--LINE--
?
?
?
?
I would be prompting the students, to try to elicit the information from them, rather than me initially supplying it, give them time to come up with the information from the poster/prezi information and visuals. This circle is for the students to fill in information, connecting the 'Description', the key questions taken from Bloom's Taxonomy and the The Credit Line. Prompts and short explanations would probably be along the lines of...
'The Credit line can tell us a lot about an artwork. Look at these key words they will help you think of your questions.....yes, who, Lin Onus.....where, Australia...He was...what else....an Indigenous Australian.....He was born during the 1950's....look at the key words.....what was happening at this time? It was a time when Indigenous people
hadn't the right to vote....
Lin Onus, 1991, ‘Fruit Bats’, Sculpture polychromed fibreglass sculptures, polychromed wooden disks, Hills Hoist clothesline, 250.0 , x 250.0 x 250.0 cm overall, Gallery of New South Wales
I prompt (by gesture, pointing) the students to fill in the elements and principles...then ask questions like;
'
Look at the colours, why do you think the artists used these particular colours'
'Remember we talkied about the design on the bats What was it called? It's significance? Here in the analysis section we include this information....'
Students add their responses and new information within the space provided indicated by the pencil. I continue this approach-questioning and prompting and supplying information when qppropriate for the remaining 2 steps.
Here is where I prompt students for information informed by Bamford ( 2003, p.4)
Who is the intended audience of the image?
-From whose perspective/point of view is the work from?
- What has been omitted, altered or included in an image?
- What does the image say about our history?
- What does the image communicate about our individual or national identity? -
-What does the image say about society?
Bamford, A, 2003, 'The Visual Literacy White Paper', retrieved March 20, 2015, < http://wwwimages.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/education/pdfs/visual-literacy-wp.pdf

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